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Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 20 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for Seneca (Ohio, United States) or search for Seneca (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE OF SALLUST. (search)
xed to the translation of them in the present volume. Sallust is supposed to have formed his style on that of Thucydides;Vell. Pat., i. 36. but he has far excelled his model, if not in energy, certainly in conciseness and perspicuity, of expression. "The speeches of Thucydides," says Cicero,Orat., c. 9. "contain so many dark and intricate passages, that they are scarcely understood." No such complaint can be made of any part of the writings of Sallust. "From any sentence in Thucydides," says Seneca the rhetorician,Controvers., iv. 24. "however remarkable for its conciseness, if a word or two be taken away, the sense will remain, if not equally ornate, yet equally entire; but from the periods of Sallust nothing can be deducted without detriment to the meaning." Apud eruditas aures, says Quintilian,Inst. Or., x. 1. nihil potest esse perfectius. The defects of his style are, that he wants the flumen orationis so much admired in Livy and Herodotus;Monboddo, Origin and Prog. of Language, vo