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, Ky., this day. They numbered about seven thousand, under the command of General Cheatham, were nearly all armed, but poorly clothed and indifferently fed. Mayfield is a small town, the seat of Graves County, on the railroad from Paducah to Union City, and midway between the two places. It is about thirty-six miles east of Columbus, Ky.--Chicago Tribune. A Federal scouting party from the Thirty-fourth N. Y. regiment at Darnestown, Md., went across the Potomac near the mouth of the Seneca, and were attacked by a superior party of the rebels. One of the Nationals was killed outright and several were wounded; one of the latter was shot through the cheek, but fled, pursued by the attacking party; on reaching a creek he threw off his gun and plunged in himself laying on his back and resting his head upon a stone with his mouth and nostrils above the water. He avoided his pursuers, and after three hours submersion he crawled to the shore of the river; his companions, who were co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.61 (search)
red by the cavalry, under General Pleasonton, which was pushed as far to the front as possible, and was soon in constant contact with the enemy's cavalry, with whom several well-conducted and successful affairs occurred. Partly in order to move men freely and rapidly, partly in consequence of the lack of accurate information as to the exact position and intention of Lee's army, the troops advanced by three main roads: that part near the Potomac by Offutt's Cross Roads and the mouth of the Seneca; that by Rockville to Frederick, and that by Brookville and Urbana to New Market. We were then in condition to act according to the development of the enemy's plans and to concentrate rapidly in any position. If Lee threatened our left flank by moving down the river road, or by crossing the Potomac at any of the fords from Coon's Ferry upward, there were enough troops on the river road to hold him in check until the rest of the army could move over to support them; if Lee took up a positio
rom Washington was covered by the cavalry, under Gen. Pleasonton, pushed as far to the front as possible, and soon in constant contact with the enemy's cavalry, with whom several well-conducted and successful affairs occurred. Partly in order to move men freely and rapidly, partly in consequence of the lack of accurate information as to the exact position and intention of Lee's army, the troops advanced by three main roads that near the Potomac by Offutt's cross-roads and the mouth of the Seneca, that by Rockville to Frederick, and that by Brookeville and Urbana to New Market. We were then in condition to act according to the development of the enemy's plans, and to concentrate rapidly in any position. If Lee threatened our left flank by moving down the river road or by crossing the Potomac at any of the forks from Coon's Ferry upward, there were enough troops on the river road to hold him in check until the rest of the army could move over to support them; if Lee took up a positi
mes, 39, 84, 90, 99. Russell. Hon. James, 40. Russell, Joseph, 17, 18, 20. Russell, Levi, 20. Russell, Mary (Robbins), 17. Russell, Philemon, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 40. Russell, Philemon R., 20, 64, 70, 90, 94, 96. Russell, Phoebe, 19. Russell, Walter, 16, 17, 20, 21. Rust, Lieutenant-Colonel, 27. Rutherford Avenue, Charlestown, 78. Rutland, Mass., 88. Salem, Mass., 4. Salem Street, Charlestown, 100. Salem Turnpike, 100. Sanborn, David, 47. Sargent, Henry, 65. Savanna River, 34. Sawyer, Edward, 92, 93, 95, 96. School Holidays, 92, 101. School Street, 47. Seabrook Landing, 34. Second Church, Malden, 88. Second Ohio Light Battery, 59. Sewall, Mr., 45. Sewall, Samuel, 79. Sherburn, Mass., 89. Sherman, General T. W., 58, 59. Ship Island, 28, 30, 37, 49, 50, 55, 56, 57, 59, 62. Simmons, Sergeant, 31. Simonds, Silas, 39. Skotto, Mr., 83. Smith, Jesse, 70, 71, 72. Smith, John, 85, 87. Soley, Dorcas, 85, 87. Soley, Dorcas (Coffin), 87. So
and Middle Town, to summon their head men to treat of peace, or all the towns in the Upper Nation should be reduced to ashes. Virginia Gazette, 496, 2, 1. But the chiefs of the Cherokees gave no heed to the peremptory message; and the British army prepared to pass the barriers of the Alleghany. From the valley of Keowee, Montgomery, on the twenty-fourth day of June, 1760, began his march, and at night encamped at the old town of Oconnee. The next day he passed from the vale of the Seneca River over the Oconnee Mountain, and encamped at the War-Woman's Creek. On the twenty-sixth, he crossed the Blue Mountains from the head spring of the Savannah to the vale of the Little Tennessee, and made his encampment at the deserted town of Stecoe. The Royal Scots and Highlanders trod the rugged defiles, which were as dangerous as men had ever penetrated, with fearless alacrity, and seemed refreshed by coming into the presence of mountains. On the morning of the twenty-seventh, the who
from Key West, and are going ashore was taken into custody by the U. S. Marshal and carried to Fort Lafayette, for a summer vacation, at least. From the upper Potomac. Montgomery County, Md., Aug. 31 --Advices from Martinsburg to-day, state that the Hon. Edmund J. Pendleton, of Berkeley co. Va., has been captured by the Confederates Mr. Pendleton was one of the most prominent Union men in that county. Everything is reported quiet along the Potomac, between the mouths of the Seneca and Monocracy rivers, this morning. The Skirmish at Summerville, Va. The Cleveland Plain dealer States that Col. Tylor's Seventh Regiment of Ohio at two skirmishes with the Confederates at CrosLane. The first was on the 21st, in which only fourteen men were engaged. The second was on the 26th, when 15 were killed and 49 were wounded. Of the first affair the Plain dealer says: Fourteen men from company K, (National Guard,) Seventh Regiment, under Captain Shutt, were engaged o
the other officers are now in Virginia. The company was named the Poolesville Light Dragoons. Two men, supposed to be active Secessionists, were captured at the same time by scouts from the 29th Pennsylvania regiment. Colonel Murphy. Two complete sets of cavalry equipments and the same number of magnificent horses were taken by the same party. Poolesville, Sept. 2.--Intelligence from the Virginia shore is to the effect that from opposite the White House Ford, near the mouth of the Seneca river down to Arlington Heights, the Confederates have heavy pickets, and are daily expecting reinforcements to enable them to extend them to Conrad's Ferry. There are at least six hundred to seven hundred now along the line. On Friday, one thousand Mississipians, as a guard, reached the vicinity of Fairfax Court-House, with sixty pieces of artillery. The force opposite Washington is estimated by the Confederates at one hundred and twenty-five thousand, with heavy reinforcements daily ar
uard on the Potomac, discovered a body of rebel cavalry on the opposite shore partially concealed by trees and ravines. From various movements it was supposed that they were in considerable force, and that they meditated constructing some offensive works there. About noon he commenced throwing shells from a point too far distant to produce much effect. Changing the position, he threw several shells into their midst, scattering them in every direction. This occurred at the mouth of the Seneca river. The Massachusetts Twelfth, Col. Webster, has recently taken a position which relieves the New York Thirty-fourth of a portion of the arduous duty of guarding nine miles of the river-line. During the shelling to-day one of the rebels, by the aid of glasses, was discovered to have on a uniform of the 34th, belonging, it is supposed, to one of the killed or captured scouts who ventured across the river last week. Continued ill health has compelled Col. Seward, of the New York 19t
, New York 28th; Captain Prescott, New York 9th. Captain Charles H. T. Collies, Judge Advocate. On the evening of the 9th one of the sentinels of the New York Thirty-fourth discovered a boat containing six men coming into the mouth of the Seneca river. Concealing himself, he allowed the boat to reach the canal aqueduct, when he challenged them. Instead of answering the challenge, the leader said to the others, "Boys, by G — d they've got us, pull back like h — l." The sentinel gave the alts belonging to this division. In the Thirtieth and Forty-sixth there was but little interest taken in the matter, but in the Twenty- ninth the "boys" went into it with a will. There the election was conducted according to Philadelphia usages. Polis were opened in the several company streets, challengers appointed, orators made stump speeches on the old plan, and the whole camp at times resounded with cheers for this and that candidate. Towards the closing of the polls mimic rows were indul
The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1863., [Electronic resource], Richmond and Danville Railroad, Superintendent's office, (search)
that the old Fort Sumter flag was captured with the assaulting party is contradicted. The old flag is still in New York. Daniel W. Voorhees, a member of the last Congress from Indiana, was seized on a railroad train, near Terre Haute, on Saturday, by the soldiers of the 63d Indiana regiment, who attempted to hang him. He was resend by the officers, but was compelled to leave the cars. On Tuesday night a small party of rebel guerillas crossed the Potomac river, at the mouth of the Seneca, and helped themselves to horses and other property. On Friday the guerillas captured Judge J. C. Underwood near his residence at Occoquan, and it was said he would be sent to Richmond. Numerous assassinations of French soldiers had occurred in Mexico. The Peruvian Minister had been ordered to leave the country. It was also rumored that Mr. Corwin had been tendered his passport, but this was not confirmed. The troubles in St. Domingo are increasing. The Spanish General had