Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) or search for Sewell's Point (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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May 19. Shots were exchanged between the U. S. Steamers Freeborn and Monticello, and a rebel battery at Sewell's Point north of Elizabeth River, Virginia.--(Doc. 177.) Two schooners with secession troops on board were taken by U. S. steamer Freeborn, in the Potomac, 10 miles below Fort Washington.--N. Y. World, May 21. The rebels at Harper's Ferry, Md., were reinforced from the south. Two thousand troops arrived from Mississippi and two regiments from Alabama.--N. Y. Herald, May 21. A meeting of the New York Bible Society was held, in reference to supplying the Bible to all soldiers, who go to fight for the Federal Government. Wm. Allen Butler presided, and speeches were made by the president, Dr. Tyng, Dr. Hitchcock, and others.--(Doc. 178.) A body of 1,000 Virginians and South Carolinians from Harper's Ferry took a position on the Virginia side of the Potomac, opposite Williamsport, a town about seven miles from Iagerstown, Md. They there were in a situat
nd of Colonel Cowdin, left Boston for the seat of war.--(Doc. 252.) Jefferson City, Mo., was occupied by Gen. Lyon, in command of the Union force, who was warmly welcomed by the mass of the citizens. Gen. Lyon there learned that Gov. Jackson and the whole military and civil government of the State had fled to Booneville, forty miles above, and that they have not far from fifteen hundred men there, the most of them armed with their own rifles and shot-guns, six or eight iron cannon, and are throwing up earthworks to protect the town from attack, both by river and by land.--N. Y. Herald, June 20. An experiment with Sawyer's American rifled cannon was made at the Rip Raps, in Hampton Roads. Seven of eleven 48-pound Map of James River. shells exploded a short distance from the rebel camp, on Sewall's Point, and one of them over their intrenchments. It created a sensation among the secessionists. A house near the secession banner displayed a white flag.--N. Y. Times, June 18.
rces to be about three miles beyond Newmarket Bridge, Va. There were no traces of the rebels near Hampton. A considerable force is also encamped on the east side of James River, some eight miles above Newport News. The two cannon mounted at Sewall's Point toward Old Point, hoe thinks, are only large field-pieces. There are, perhaps, one thousand Confederates at Sewall's Point.--N. Y. Times, August 13. The Western Virginia State Convention, in a series of resolutions, declared itself unalSewall's Point.--N. Y. Times, August 13. The Western Virginia State Convention, in a series of resolutions, declared itself unalterably opposed to any compromise with the rebels. --(Doc. 176.) The Helena (Arkansas) Shield, of this day, contains the following:--From the Hon. C. W. Adams of this county, who arrived at home a few days since from the northern part of this State, we learn that on last Monday week thirteen hundred Indian warriors--Southern allies — crossed the Arkansas River near Fort Smith, en route for McCulloch's camp. These Indians are armed with rifle, butcher knife, and tomahawk, and had their fa
December 19. Maj. Frank R. Bloom, of Macon, Ga., Aide to Gen. Henry R. Jackson, died to-night of pneumonia, at that place. He distinguished himself at Sewall's Point and at Greenbrier, Va., and was possessed of all the generous qualities and greatness of soul which characterize the true patriot and soldier; and in the community in which he lived no man was more beloved or had more devoted friends.--Richmond Dispatch, Dec. 27. Captain Ricketts, First Artillery U. S. A., who was wounded and captured at the battle of Bull Run, arrived at Washington, released on parole, accompanied by his wife. At ten o'clock this morning a rebel battery of three guns, flanked with about two hundred infantry, suddenly commenced shelling the encampment of Col. Geary's Pennsylvania regiment, near Point of Rocks, Md. About twenty shells, well aimed, fell in the midst of the encampment — the first within a few feet of Lieut.-Col. De Korponay, commanding. The six companies in camp were well d
eft Rolla, Mo., destined, it was supposed, for Springfield, Mo., by a circuitous route. As the steamboat Express, which runs between Old Point and Newport News, Va., was leaving the latter place this morning, a rebel tugboat was seen off Sewell's Point. She carried a Commodore's blue pennant, which was mistaken at first for a flag of truce, but on the Express arriving within range she fired a shot across her bows, followed by several shells. The greatest consternation prevailed for a timeat subsequently made her appearance for the second time, but the Express had crowded all steam on, and reported the circumstance to the flagship. After a long delay the gunboats started, and steaming toward the scene, threw a few shells into Sewell's Point and Pig Point batteries, without producing any effect. But for the delay in the gunboats getting to the spot, the rebels might have been intercepted, and the schooner saved. The schooner had been lined with zinc, and fitted out with a valua
iment, were instantly killed, and W. W. Bowman, of Company I, same regiment, was seriously injured. Jones belonged in Greenpoint, Long Island, and Shepard in Lowell, Mass. Four or five other persons, who were in the vicinity, were also injured, but none of them seriously. A flag of truce was sent from Fortress Monroe to Craney Island, Va., early this morning, to inform General Huger that the prisoners of war from Fort Warren, had arrived. The bark was accordingly towed up opposite Sewell's Point, by the steamer Rancocas, and the tug Adriatic; and at about one o'clock, the rebel steamer West-Point came out from Norfolk, and the prisoners were transferred. They numbered four captains, three first lieutenants, six second lieutenants, two third lieutenants, and three hundred and eighty-four others, rank and file, and colored servants. They were taken at Hatteras and Santa Rosa, and were the last of the prisoners of war at Fort Warren, except Commodore Barron. The Richmond Exa
May 8. Nine Union regiments, under Generals Milroy and Schenck, fought fourteen thousand rebels, under General Jackson, at McDowell, in Virginia, from six till nine P. M., when they fell back to the town of Franklin in good order. (Doc. 10.) The bombardment of the rebel batteries on Sewell's Point and Craney Island was actively carried forward by the Monitor, the Naugatuck, and other vessels of the fleet. The Merrimac finally appeared, but as she evinced a disinclination to come out into the roadstead, and the National vessels were equally disinclined to go up to her, the combat ceased. The scene was an exciting one for some time, and was witnessed by President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton.--(Doc. 26.) Messrs. Richardson, Knapp, and Robinson, of Illinois; Law and Voorhees, of Indiana; Allen, White, Noble, Pendleton, Morris, and Vallandigham, of Ohio; Johnson and Ancona, of Pennsylvania, and Shields of Oregon, issued an address to the Democracy of the United States,
May 16. The following General Order, made by President Lincoln, at Norfolk, Va., on the eleventh of May, was this day issued: The skilful and gallant movements of Major-Gen. John E. Wool and the forces under his command, which resulted in the surrender of Norfolk, and the evacuation of the strong batteries erected by the rebels on Sewell's Point and Craney Island, and the destruction of the rebel iron-clad steamer Merrimac, are regarded by the President as among the most important successes of the present war. He therefore orders that his thanks as Commander--in Chief of the Army and Navy, be communicated by the War Department to Major-Gen. John E. Wool, and the officers and soldiers of his command, for their gallantry and good conduct in the brilliant operations mentioned. The United States steamer Oriental was wrecked on Body's Island, thirty miles north of Cape Hatteras, N. C.--The Senate of the United States confirmed the nomination of Brevet Major-Gen. Wool to be