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The Affair at Sewell's Point. --The Washington correspondent of the Baltimore Sun says: It seems that both sides claim a victory for the affair at Norfolk on Saturday last, but it was the remark of a Roman Consul "that there could not be much fighting where nobody was killed." It is impossible, however, to withhold the meed of praise to a couple of Senators who somehow got prominence in the "gazettes" from having courageously witnessed the cannonade at a stand-point but four or five miles off. The bold couple above alluded to were Wade and Morrill, who were on the wharf at Old Point, and, it is reported, afterwards went to Washington.
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1861., [Electronic resource], Extra session of the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States. (search)
The Third assault at Sewell's Point.two steamers engaged.shots exchanged, but Nobody hurt.[Special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Norfolk, Va., May 22d, 1861. Another attack was made on Sewell's Point yesterday morning, by the steamer Minnesota. Two shots were fired from the battery and three from the steamer, after which she moved off in the direction of James river.--Later in the day another attack was made by the tug. Young America. A few shots were fired from the battery, causinSewell's Point yesterday morning, by the steamer Minnesota. Two shots were fired from the battery and three from the steamer, after which she moved off in the direction of James river.--Later in the day another attack was made by the tug. Young America. A few shots were fired from the battery, causing the tug to retreat. Thus several unsuccessful attempts have been made to prevent the erection of our works; and what is fortunate, so far we have sustained no injury of any note. On the other hand, in the engagement of Sunday, the Monticello is reported to have lost six men.--Capt Hunter, of our Navy, who visited her after the fight, brings to us this statement.--It is thought no one was killed on either side in the last skirmish, but the readiness of our men in fighting evinces a spirit of
Portsmouth, Va., May 22, 1861. The battery at Sewell's Point was again the object of interest yesterday evening. A steamer from the baboon's squadron about Old Point and the mouths of our rivers, approached this battery and shots were exchanged. The respectful distance, however, maintained by the infernal invader, proved to be without the range of our guns. This was a source of regret, for we did not wish to waste a grain of powder. Captain Colquitt, the gallant commander of the accomplished Light Guards from Georgia, now has charge of this battery. In the former sparring he had to cool the ardor of our braves. He made them an eloquent speech of fifteen minutes, which had the desired effect, and then suiting the action to the word, himself aimed the shot which told upon the Monticello. The shell which the steamer tired yesterday evening fell near the battery without exploding-- the fuse having re fused, and thus thwarted the devilish designs of its operators. I s
The First attack on Sewell's Point battery.a Northern account. The following account of the first engagement at Sewell's Point, on Saturday last, is from the Washington Republican, (Government organ.) It is about as wide of the mark as were the . Saturday witnessed the actual opening of the war on the part of the United States--the assault upon the battery at Sewell's Point, the exterior of a line of batteries which guard the Elizabeth river, the approach to Norfolk. There are seven batteo gone on undisturbed by the fleet, till Friday and Saturday the attempt was persisted in of throwing up a battery on Sewell's Point. -- This position commands the vessels blockading James river, and if mounted with heavy and effective guns would renlue. Among the prizes was one British bark, whose cargo is valued at $160,000. The bombardment of the battery at Sewell's Point, by the steamer Freeborn, appears to be the opening of offensive operations on the part of the Government forces in t