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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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a range, before that time never attained by any piece of artillery known to the world; General Beauregard protested against the bombardment as inhuman and unheard of. The United States gunboats Satellite and Reliance were captured to-night off the mouth of the Rappahannock River, by a party of rebels, under the command of Lieutenant Commander J. Taylor Wood, of the rebel navy.--Colonel Wilder, with a force belonging to the army of the Cumberland, crossed the Tennessee River, opposite Shell Mound, and burned the railroad bridge over the Nicojack, destroying for the time all communication between the rebels at Chattanooga and those in the vicinity of Bridgeport, Ala.--A riot occurred at Danville, Ill., in which three citizens were killed and a number wounded.--the schooner Wave, having run the blockade at San Luis Pass, near Galveston, Texas, was captured by the National gunboat Cayuga. The expedition to Central Mississippi, which left La Grange, Tenn., on the thirteenth insta
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 8.89 (search)
he front to see that his orders were carried out, or were modified to suit the ever-shifting scenes of battle.--D. H. H. The failure to attack Negley's division in the cove on September 10th Thomas's corps, after crossing at Bridgeport, Shell Mound, and Caperton's Ferry, arrived, September 4th, near Trenton, in Will's Valley (east of Sand Mountain). On the 6th Negley's division, with Baird's supporting, reached Johnson's Crook, and on the 10th crossed Missionary Ridge into McLemore's Cov over Sand Mountain and seized Winston's Gap, while Sheridan's division, moving via Trenton, was close at hand. On the 10th McCook's three divisions were at Alpine. Crittenden's corps by September 4th was across the Tennessee (at Bridgeport, Shell Mound, and Battle Creek). On the 9th Wood's division occupied Chattanooga, and Palmer and Van Cleve marched to Rossville. On the 10th Crittenden, leaving Wagner's brigade to occupy Chattanooga, pursued the enemy toward Dalton and Ringgold. Wood re
, and was soon armed and supplied with ammunition, but the tenor of Colonel Reynolds' dispatches during the day was such as to lead me to think it judicious to hold the regiment disposable, lest the enemy should move up on the west side and attempt to cross near Chattanooga. About 10 o'clock that night I received from him the following dispatch: General Leadbetter: Scouts came in from Kelly's Ferry and reported, on reliable information, that the enemy, 5,000 strong, had crossed at Shell Mound. A. W. Reynolds, Colonel, Commanding. I answered: If you are satisfied your information is reliable, burn all the bridges on the railroad and country roads, and fall back with your command to Lookout Mountain. I will meet you there with Colonel Glenn's regiment. D. Leadbetter, Brigadier-General. The point indicated is close to the Tennessee River, where the railroad and all the country roads intersect each other. To this dispatch the colonel replied that he would mo
apturing camp, wagons with supplies, and ammunition. The column under Generai Sill formed a junction with General Negley's column at Jasper. Adams' cavalry fled 43 miles, without stopping at Chattanooga. The enemy were crossing the river at Shell Mound with infantry and artillery. Adams' cavalry turned them back. Mitchel. On the 8th he says: I am ordered by General Halleck to push cars and locomotives across the river at Decatur. This cannot be done until the enemy's troops aes, without stopping. Ah attempt was made to rally in Jasper, but they cursed General Adams and rushed on with their foaming horses. Hundreds of Union men have flocked into Jasper from the mountains. The enemy, who was crossing the river at Shell Mound, retreated to Chattanooga by rail this morning. Appearances indicate that they will not defend Chattanooga. There were but two regiments at Atlanta, Ga., on Tuesday last. Colonel Starnes' regiment of cavalry avoided meeting us, and are now
th him seven or eight regiments, but they all left. General Negley is on the march to McMinnville, at which point the rebels are said to have a camp. An expedition under General Dumont will co-operate and will advance from Murfreesborough. O. M. Mitchel. Major-General Halleck. No. 2.-reports of Brig.. Genl. James S. Neyley, U. S. Army. headquarters U. S. Forces, Before Chattanooga, Tenn., June 7, 1862-10 a. m. Sir: Yesterday morning moved Colonel Sills command direct to Shell Mound, to divert the enemy opposite that point; also prevent them from crossing. Colonel Sill found two pieces of artillery in position and opened upon it without reply. As I expected, they threw heavy re-enforcements to that point lastnight expecting the attack to be made there. Colonel Scott and Captain Shaeffer's Pennsylvania cavalry were sent from Jasper by a path through the mountain, which resulted in surprising and capturing the enemy's pickets at the ferry and preventing the further
quietly collected at points concealed from hostile observation ; and a few days sufficed for the construction of bridges by Sheridan at Bridgeport, Reynolds at Shell Mound, some 10 or 15 miles above, and by McCook at Caperton's ferry, opposite Stevenson, below; while Gen. Brannan prepared to cross on rafts at Battle creek, between Bridgeport and Shell Mound. The passage was commenced Aug. 29. by McCook, and completed Sept. 8. at all points within ten days: the several corps pushing; forward, across high, steep mountains to concentrate at Trenton, Georgia, in the valley of Lookout creek, which runs north-easterly into the Tennessee just below Chattanoagg believe that he should use it on his extreme right. To this end, his divisions were crossed as they arrived at Bridgeport; the foremost (Ewing's) moving by Shell Mound to Trenton, threatening to assail and turn Bragg's extreme right. But the residue of this army, as it came up, moved quietly and screened from Rebel observatio
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
the opposite bank, and almost hearing their words. Having seen enough, we returned to Chattanooga; and in order to hurry up my command, on which so much depended, I started back to Kelly's in hopes to catch the steamboat that same evening; but on my arrival the boat had gone. I applied to the commanding officer, got a rough boat manned by four soldiers, and started down the river by night. I occasionally took a turn at the oars to relieve some tired man, and about midnight we reached Shell Mound, where General Whittaker, of Kentucky, furnished us a new and good crew, with which we reached Bridgeport by daylight. I started Ewing's division in advance, with orders to turn aside toward Trenton, to make the enemy believe we were going to turn Bragg's left by pretty much the same road Rosecrans had followed; but with the other three divisions I followed the main road, via the Big Trestle at Whitesides, and reached General Hooker's headquarters, just above Wauhatchee, on the 20th; my
les--without stopping. An attempt was made to rally in Jasper, but they cursed Gen. Adams, and rushed on with their foaming horses. Hundreds of Union men have flocked into Jasper from the mountains. The enemy, who were crossing the river at Shell Mound, retreated to Chattanooga by rail this morning. Appearances indicate that they will not defend Chattanooga. There were but two regiments at Atlanta, Georgia, on Tuesday last. Col. Starns' regiment of artillery avoided meeting us, and are all push on to Chattanooga to-morrow. Jas. S. Negley, Brigadier-General Commanding. headquarters U. S. Forces, before Chattanooga, June 7, 10 A. M. Gen. O. M. Mitchel, Huntsville: sir: Yesterday morning moved Col. Sill's command direct to Shell Mound to divert the enemy opposite that point, also prevent them from crossing. Col. Sill found two pieces of artillery in position and opened upon it without reply. As I expected, they threw heavy reinforcements to that point last night, expectin
e me with renewed energy. I immediately ordered my leading division (Ewing's) to march via Shell Mound to Trenton, demonstrate against Lookout Ridge, but to be prepared to turn quickly and follow neral Ewing was still in Trenton, and the other two were toiling along the terrible road from Shell Mound to Chattanooga. No troops ever were or could be in better condition than mine, or who labo Lookout Mountain, and driving the enemy from before Chattanooga, is submitted: On leaving Shell Mound, the One Hundred and Fifteenth Illinois, the Eighty-fourth Indiana, and the Fifth Indiana bateutenant-Colonel Cummings; Fifty-first Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Wood,) under my command, left Shell Mound November twenty-third, at nine o'clock A. M. After a tiresome march over rough roads, I repors brigade had, I believe, marched nearly all night the night before, from the neighborhood of Shell Mound, in order to be present at this attack. Almost from the moment our forces crossed the cree
L. Anderson; Eighty-fourth Illinois, Colonel L. H. Waters; Twenty-fourth Ohio, Colonel D. J. Higgins; Thirty-sixth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel O. H. P. Cary; Twenty-third Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel James C. Foy; aggregate officers and men. including staff, one thousand six hundred and eighty-seven. To which were attached Batterries H and M, Fourth United States artillery, commanded by Lieutenants Cushing and Russell (ten pieces). In conjunction with the division, we marched thence to Shell Mound, to Squirrel Town Creek, and thence to Lookout Valley; and on the morning of the ninth instant, with the Twenty-fourth Ohio, Twenty-third Kentucky, and Eighty-fourth Illinois, I ascended, or rather climbed, upon Lookout Mountain, near Hawkins' farm, nine miles to the right of Chattanooga, and met and drove the enemy from the mountain, with no loss to my force. The enemy left the mountain to the north-east, via Summer City. Cavalry was all that I found on the mountain. As I reached the
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