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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
ng have ever been great military crimes; and every officer and soldier in my command knows what stress I have laid upon them, and that, so far as in my power lies, I will punish them to the full extent of the law and orders. The law is one thing, the execution of the law another. God himself has commanded: Thou shalt not kill, thou shalt not steal, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's goods, etc. Will any one say these things are not done now as well as before these laws were announced at Sinai? I admit the law to be that no officer or soldier of the United States shall commit waste or destruction of cornfields, orchards, potato-patches, or any kind of pillage on the property of friend or foe near Memphis, and that I stand prepared to execute the law as far as possible. No officer or soldier should enter the house or premises of any peaceable citizen, no matter what his politics, unless on business; and no such officer or soldier can force an entrance unless he have a written o
ill ne'er march again! We will fight for our flag with that chieftain commanding-- The Southrons are false to the red, white, and blue-- The “bow in the cloud” that our fathers left standing, We swear to preserve it — mast, pennon, and hue! Mid Sinai's deep thunders its colors were blended-- With those thunders alone shall its glories be ended! The bonnets of blue to the pibroch will rally-- The fader-land utters its deep-stirring cry-- Green Erin!--oh when, to the tip of shilaly, Was Erin eot the merit! But, thoa crooked the bow, straight the arrow went on: They may work at the warp — at the woof — at their will; But a weaver too mighty is mocking their skill. Then up with the thistle — the shamrock — the lilies-- The tri-color gathers the nations in one!-- Each patriot, armed with the strength of Achilles, Will strike for the flag that floats nearest the sun! Mid Sinai's deep thunders its colors were blended-- With those thunders alone shall its glories be ended!
14. Grant. by George H. Boker. As Moses stood upon the flaming hill, With all the people gathered at his feet, Waiting in Sinai's valley, there to meet The awful bearer of Jehovah's will; So, Grant, thou stand'st, amidst the trumpets shrill, And the wild fiery storms that flash and beat In iron thunder and in leaden sleet, Topmost of all, and most exposed to ill. Oh! stand thou firm, great leader of our race, Hope of our future, till the time grows bland, And into ashes drops war's dying brand! Then let us see thee, with benignant grace, Descend thy height, God's glory on thy face, And the law's tables safe within thy hand.
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Author's note (search)
Author's note The facts relating to the life of Garrison and the anti-slavery struggle recited in this volume were gathered from the monumental work, William Lloyd Garrison, The Story of His Life Told by His Children (Four Volumes, Octavo, Houghton, Miffin and Company, Boston, Mass.), a fascinating book which should be found upon the shelves of every public library in America. From lips that Sinai's trumpet blew We heard a tender under-song; Thy very wrath from pity grew, From love of man thy hate of wrong. Whittier, To Garrison.
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Seventh: return to the Senate. (search)
s master, is shut out from all instruction; while in many places—incredible to relate—the law itself, by cumulative provisions, positively forbids that he shall be taught to read! Of course the slave cannot be allowed to read: for his soul would then expand in larger air, while he saw the glory of the North Star, and also the helping truth, that God, who made iron, never made a slave; for he would then become familiar with the Scriptures, with the Decalogue still speaking in the thunders of Sinai,— with that ancient text, He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death—with that other text, Masters, give unto your servants that which is just and equal,—with that great story of Redemption, when the Lord raised the slave-born Moses to deliver his chosen people from the house of bondage,—and with that sublimer story, where the Saviour died a cruel death, that all men, without distinction of race, might be saved, leaving to mank
s master, is shut out from all instruction; while in many places—incredible to relate—the law itself, by cumulative provisions, positively forbids that he shall be taught to read! Of course the slave cannot be allowed to read: for his soul would then expand in larger air, while he saw the glory of the North Star, and also the helping truth, that God, who made iron, never made a slave; for he would then become familiar with the Scriptures, with the Decalogue still speaking in the thunders of Sinai,— with that ancient text, He that stealeth a man and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death—with that other text, Masters, give unto your servants that which is just and equal,—with that great story of Redemption, when the Lord raised the slave-born Moses to deliver his chosen people from the house of bondage,—and with that sublimer story, where the Saviour died a cruel death, that all men, without distinction of race, might be saved, leaving to mank
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Capital punishment (1855) (search)
he authority of a statute so uncertain in its meaning that no sheriff would hang an individual man on a precept so equivocal, and so much surrounded with difficulties! If men are to come here and propound it as a statute sounding down to us from Sinai, and before Sinai, then it is a statute that we must put our hands on our lips, and our lips in the dust, and obey to the letter. We have no right to reject one word and take the next; there is no trifling to be done with it. Gentlemen, we haSinai, then it is a statute that we must put our hands on our lips, and our lips in the dust, and obey to the letter. We have no right to reject one word and take the next; there is no trifling to be done with it. Gentlemen, we have now dismissed the subject of obligation. It is unnecessary to say,,after this, that I do not believe in the obligation. If society can get permission to take life from this text, it is the most that it can get; it is no command, no continuing command. But, mark you, even that permission your Constitution does not allow you to use! Your Constitution does not even recognize it as a permission; because, if it is, it is a per. mission to commit suicide. You have got to upset the American i
ut mountain, through Chattanooga valley, to the further end of Missionary ridge. Still, the firing continued in the night, on the mountain. The rebels, at dark, had not left the topmost crest, and their signal-light on the extreme summit, waving to and fro, revealed to the luckless chief on Missionary ridge the extent of his calamity. Every now and then, spluttering discharges of musketry, muffled by distance, could be heard in the valley, and fierce jets of flame, like those once seen on Sinai, seemed to issue from the mountain-side. The long lines of camp-fires marked the advance or retreat of the combatants, and cries of defiance or suffering came down from the clouds, as if supernatural armies were contending in the air. But, finally, all the noise of battle ceased; the wounded, writhing in pain, and the sentinels walking their rounds, were almost the only ones not reposing from the fatigues and excitements of the day, and an unusual quiet settled over the whole long line.
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Occasional Poems (search)
entombed and one alive; Heard the martial thousand tread Battleward from Marblehead; Saw within the rock-walled bay Treville's lilied pennons play, And the fisher's dory met By the barge of Lafayette, Telling good news in advance Of the coming fleet of France! Church to reverend memories dear, Quaint in desk and chandelier; Bell, whose century-rusted tongue Burials tolled and bridals rung; Loft, whose tiny organ kept Keys that Snetzler's hand had swept; Altar, o'er whose tablet old Sinai's law its thunders rolled! Suddenly the sharp cry came: ‘Look! St. Michael's is aflame!’ Round the low tower wall the fire Snake-like wound its coil of ire. Sacred in its gray respect From the jealousies of sect, ‘Save it,’ seemed the thought of all, ‘Save it, though our roof-trees fall!’ Up the tower the young men sprung; One, the bravest, outward swung By the rope, whose kindling strands Smoked beneath the holder's hands, Smiting down with strokes of power Burning fragments fr
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), The conflict with slavery (search)
he oppressors of the poor is called forth by the writer's stoical contemplation of the tyranny of his Christian brethren at the South. It is not necessary, says Evangelicus, to inquire whether the New Testament does not tolerate slavery as a permanent institution. And this is said when the entire slave-holding church has sheltered its abominations under the pretended sanction of the gospel; when slavery, including within itself a violation of every command uttered amidst the thunders of Sinai, a system which has filled the whole South with the oppression of Egypt and the pollutions of Sodom, is declared to be an institution of the Most High. With all due deference to the author, we tell him, and we tell the church, North and South, that this question must be met. Once more we repeat the solemn inquiry which has been already made in our columns, Is the Bible to enslave the world Has it been but a vain dream of ours that the mission of the Author of the gospel was to undo the heav
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