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, as they approach the river, become deep, or spread out in tangled marshes. The ridges between these creeks are considerably elevated above the river-level. The Tennessee flows northwest for some distance, until a little west of Hamburg, a point nineteen miles from Corinth, it takes its final bend to the north. Here, two affluents, Owl and Lick Creeks, flowing nearly parallel, somewhat north of east, from three to five miles apart, empty into the Tennessee. Owl Creek, uniting with Snake Creek, takes that name below their junction. It forms the northern limit of the ridge, which Lick Creek bounds on the south. These streams, rising some ten or twelve miles back, toward Corinth, were bordered near their mouths by swamps filled with back-water, and impassable except where the roads crossed. The inclosed space, a rude parallelogram, is a rolling table-land, about one hundred feet above the river-level, with its water-shed lying near Lick Creek, and either slope broken by de
of the right wing, and soon raged along the whole line, lasting, with a short intermission, for six hours. It began a mile from Pittsburg. When it ended, the landing was barely covered by one flank; the other was crowded about the crossing of Snake Creek. The battle was renewed by Gladden's gallant brigade, now commanded by Colonel Daniel W. Adams. Adams took it in with his usual mettle. There was a fierce wrestle; but it was the beating of the wave against the rock. The Confederates wi coolest of the men, stuck to their colors and strove to rally and form a line of battle wherever they could find a nucleus. There were many such heroic spirits in the crushed and mangled mass which. was huddling back into the angle between Snake Creek and the Tennessee River. Sherman in his report says: My command had become decidedly of a mixed character. Buckland's brigade was the only one that retained its organization. Buckland's own report, however, does not sustain this view. He me
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
he river. Between the two points a bridge had been built across Snake Creek by our troops, at which Wallace's command had assisted, expresslrom Pittsburg Landing, and on the ridge which divides the waters of Snake and Lick creeks, the former entering into the Tennessee just north ous line from Lick Creek, on the left, to Owl Creek, a branch of Snake Creek, on the right, facing nearly south, and possibly a little west. tiss, a continuous and unbroken line was maintained all day from Snake Creek or its tributaries on the right to Lick Creek or the Tennessee od ready for any duty. Sherman came next, his right extending to Snake Creek. His command, like the other two, was complete in its organizatim, and had served with him afterward, in garrison Bridge over Snake Creek by which General Lew Wallace's troops reached the field, Sunday rly two miles to the left. Owl Creek empties from the left into Snake Creek, a short distance above the Bridge. Bivouac of the Federal tr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
constantly swelling current along the west bank of the river. The mouth of Snake Creek was full of them swimming across. We arrived at the landing about 1 o'clockhe east by the river, which here runs nearly due north, on the north-west by Snake Creek and its tributary, Owl Creek, and on the south, or south-west, by a range ofbattle. Pittsburg Landing is three-quarters of a mile above the mouth of Snake Creek, and two and a quarter miles below the mouth of Lick Creek. Shiloh Church isprincipal roads are the River road, as it will here be called, which crosses Snake Creek at the bridge before mentioned, and running a mile west of Pittsburg Landing Division, commanded by W. H. L. Wallace, in the space bounded by the river, Snake Creek, the River road, and the right-hand road leading west from the landing. Alohundred yards from us; and that the bridge by which Lew Wallace was to cross Snake Creek was to his right and rear at an angle, as he pointed, of about forty degrees
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
er of two belligerents in all the sinews and resources of war. A narrow cul de sac, formed by Snake Creek and Lick Creek, with the broad bank-full river forming its bottom, tactically as well as stra occupied a continuous line from Lick Creek, on the [Federal] left, to Owl Creek, a branch of Snake Creek, on the [Federal] right, facing nearly south, and possibly a little west, says General Grant.attered farm fields of from fifty to seventy-five acres. Pittsburg Landing, near the mouth of Snake Creek, was about three miles from that of Lick Creek. The two roads from Corinth, while crossing Lhe shortest road between the two landings was one near the river leading over a bridge across Snake Creek. As it has been denied in the highest quarters that the Major-General Bushrod R. Johnsoallace's division of General Grant's army also had found its way after dark on the 6th across Snake Creek from Crump's Landing to the point near the bridge where General Sherman had rallied the remai
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The March of Lew Wallace's division to Shiloh. (search)
orities: (1.) The Official or Thom map (p. 508), for roads and distances on the south side of Snake Creek; (2.) the Union Camp map (pp. 496-7), for the location of camps morning of April 5th, 1862; ( in General Badeau's Military history of U. S. Grant, for the main roads on the north side of Snake Creek, that map also agreeing with General McPherson's sketch map without scale in Official Records and the right of the army, the junction of Owl and Snake creeks being placed above the upper Snake creek bridge, instead of below it. General Wallace himself has informed the editors that that map is incorrect, and that its inaccuracy arose from a prevalent confusion of the names of Snake and Owl creeks. That map, however, faithfully represents General Wallace's claim that the head of his colue being about six miles. The cannonading, distinctly audible, quickened the steps of the men. Snake Creek [Owl Creek], difficult of passage at all times on account of its steep banks and swampy botto
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Shiloh. (search)
it the worst possible battle-ground. The principal streams are Lick creek, which empties into the Tennessee above the landing; Owl creek, which rises near the source of Lick creek, flows southeast, encircling the battle-field, and falls into Snake creek, which empties into the Tennessee below the landing, or about three miles below Lick creek. The country at the period referred to was a primeval forest, except where occasional settlers had opened out into small farms. The Army of the Tenneserhaps, be better determined. General Sherman says the camp was chosen by General Smith, and by his orders he (Sherman and Hurlbut) took position. He further says: I mention for future history that our right flank was well guarded by Owl and Snake creeks, our left by Lick creek, leaving us simply to guard our front. No stronger position was ever held by any army. --(Record of court-martial, Memphis, Tennessee, August, 1862.) When the writer reached Shiloh (April 2d) he found the impressio
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The Army at Pittsburg landing-injured by a fall --the Confederate attack at Shiloh-the first day's fight at Shiloh-General Sherman-condition of the Army-close of the first day's fight --the second day's fight-retreat and defeat of the Confederates (search)
t and near the river. Between the two points a bridge had been built across Snake Creek by our troops, at which Wallace's command had assisted, expressly to enable meetinghouse called Shiloh. It stood on the ridge which divides the waters of Snake and Lick creeks, the former emptying into the Tennessee just north of Pittsburgmade a continuous line from Lick Creek on the left to Owl Creek, a branch of Snake Creek, on the right, facing nearly south and possibly a little west. The water inture of Prentiss, a continuous and unbroken line was maintained all day from Snake Creek or its tributaries on the right to Lick Creek or the Tennessee on the left aanization and ready for any duty. Sherman came next, his right extending to Snake Creek. His command, like the other two, was complete in its organization and reade to the defence of Shiloh. The right of my line rested near the bank of Snake Creek, a short distance above the bridge which had been built by the troops for th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ion I found Snake Creek Gap, affording me a good practicable way to reach Resaca, a point on the enemy's railroad line of communication, eighteen miles below Dalton. Accordingly I ordered General McPherson to move rapidly from his position at Gordon's Mills, via Ship's Gap, Villanow, and Snake Creek Gap directly on Resaca, or the railroad at any point below Dalton, and to make a bold attack. After breaking the railroad well he was ordered to fall back to a strong defensive position near Snake Creek, and stand ready to fall on the enemy's flank when he retreated, as I judged he would. During the movement General Thomas was to make a strong feint of attack in front, while General Schofield pressed down from the north. Generals Thomas moved from Ringgold on the 7th, occupying Tunnel Hill, facing the Buzzard Roost Gap, meeting with little opposition, and pushing the enemy's cavalry well through the gap. General McPherson reached Snake Creek Gap on the 8th, completely surprising a brig
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
ms, and that if a night march could be made to Tilton this rear guard could be cut off. 12 midnight, received note from Major-General Sherman,--asking to have the railroad repaired to Dalton: Move cavalry force forward carefully, supported by infantry; select on south front of Dalton for forts, in case the enemy should turn; have not discovered whether he is at Resaca or not; think he is about Swamp Creek; keep your troops light and feel to the right. Have a good force at the gap of Snake Creek. Tell McCook and Stoneman to strike the retiring wagons of the enemy. McCook's cavalry opened communication with General Sherman at about 7 p. m. to-day. Schofield's left about one mile from our right. Took about 100 prisoners. Day clear and warm. Lost very few men in wounded in skirmish of to-day. Roads good, but very narrow. Dense woods on either side the latter half of to-day's march Plenty of water. May 14.-2.30 a. m., instructed General Stanley to move directly on enemy
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