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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
m to be properly fortified. A recommendation had even been made by my immediate predecessor that the outer defenses of Charleston harbor should be given up, as untenable against the iron-clads and monitors then known to be under construction at the North, and that the water line of the immediate city of Charleston should be made the sole line of defense. This course, however, not having been authorized by the Richmond authorities, it was not attempted, except that the fortifications of Cole's Island — the key to the defense of the Stono river — was abandoned, and the harbor in the mouth of the Stono left open to the enemy, who made it their base of operations. Immediately on my arrival I inspected the defenses of Charleston and Savannah, and made a requisition on the War Department for additional troops and heavy guns deemed necessary; but neither could be furnished, owing, it was stated, to the pressing wants of the Confederacy at other points. Shortly afterward, Florida was adde
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 13: Conclusion. (search)
r regiments came in. The governors of States, by especial effort, saved their colored troops from this chagrin; but we found here, as more than once before, the disadvantage of having no governor to stand by us. It's a far cry to Loch Awe, said the Highland proverb. We knew to our cost that it was a far cry to Washington in those days, unless an officer left his duty and stayed there all the time. In June, 1864, the regiment was ordered to Folly Island, and remained there and on Cole's Island till the siege of Charleston was done. It took part in the battle of Honey Hill, and in the capture of a fort on James Island, of which Corporal Robert Vendross wrote triumphantly in a letter, When we took the pieces we found that we recapt our own pieces back that we lost on Willtown Revear (River) and thank the Lord did not lose but seven men out of our regiment. In February, 1865, the regiment was ordered to Charleston to do provost and guard duty, in March to Savannah, in June t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
hem to be properly fortified. A recommendation had even been made by my immediate predecessor that the outer defences of Charleston Harbor should be given up as untenable against the ironclads and monitors then known to be under construction at the North, and that the water-line of the immediate city of Charleston should be made the sole line of defence. This course, however, not having been authorized by the Richmond authorities, it was not attempted, except that the fortifications of Cole's Island — the key to the defence of the Stono river — was abandoned and the harbor in the mouth of the Stono left open to the enemy, who made it their base of operations. Immediately on my arrival I inspected the defences of Charleston and Savannah, and made a requisition on the War Department for additional troops and heavy guns deemed necessary; but neither could be furnished, owing, it was stated, to the pressing wants of the Confederacy at other points. Shortly afterward Florida was added
killed the notorious chief, Umbagh, and three men, and that he wounded four. He took twelve prisoners. The Nationals lost nothing. A train of seventeen wagons, laden with government stores, which left Rolla, Mo., on Monday last, was overtaken to-day, when about twenty miles out on the Springfield road, by a band of rebel guerrillas, who burned the wagons and their contents, and carried off all the mules, eighty-six in number.--Four United States gunboats bombarded the rebel works on Cole's Island, Stono Inlet, S. C., when the rebels burned their barracks and evacuated the Island. Lieutenant-Colonel West took possession of Tucson, Arizona, this day, without firing a shot. The confederate troops stationed in that city fled across the Rio Grande on his approach, and the citizens of Tucson who were imbued with secession proclivities started for Sonora. The citizens of the town came out and met the troops in great numbers, greeting them with cheers, and of their own accord sent
March 28. The Legislature of Massachusetts adopted unanimously a resolution tendering to the soldiers of that State the thanks of the Commonwealth for the services they had rendered in the war for the restoration of the Union, and pledging such reenforcements to their support as the National authority should from time to time demand.--The National gunboat Diana, was this day captured by the rebels near Pattersonville, La.--(Doc. 149.) This morning Coles's Island, nine miles from Charleston, S. C., was taken possession of by the One Hundredth New York volunteers, under the command of Colonel George F. B. Dandy.--(Doc. 150.) The rebels burned the temporary bridge with which the National forces had replaced the Stone Bridge at Bull Run, Va. They also were engaged in collecting all the grain and other supplies they could obtain in Loudon and Fauquier counties in that State. The steamer Sam Gaty was stopped and boarded at Sibley, Mo., by a gang of rebel guerrillas who
er of the Fifty-fourth to General Strong's brigade. So when the troops were brought away from James Island General Strong took this regiment. into his command. It left James Island on Thursday, July sixteenth, at nine P. M., and marched to Cole's Island, which they reached at four o'clock on Friday morning, marching all night, most of the way in single file, over swampy and muddy ground. There they remained during the day, with hard tack and coffee for their fare. and this only what was leg put on the transport, the General Hunter, in a boat which took about fifty at a time. There they breakfasted on the same fare, and had no other food before entering into the assault on Fort Wagner in the evening. The General Hunter left Coles's Island for Folly Island at six A. M., and the troops landed at the Pawnee Landing about half-past 9 A. M., and thence marched to the point opposite Morris Island, reaching there about two o'clock in the afternoon. They were transported in a steamer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
th the outer world. And it is simple history to add that, even as it was, through private enterprise which should have tempted our Government to a bolder course, lines of blockade-running steamers entered and left the port of Charleston at regular, stated intervals, up to nearly the very close of the war. Almost at the moment of this naval attack on the Federal fleet occurred another incident of note in the operations around Charleston. General Pemberton had caused to be removed from Cole's Island eleven guns of heavy caliber which served to guard the entrance of the Stono River. This barrier removed, the Federal gun-boats had free ingress to the river, and as often as they chose to (lo so plied with impunity as near to Fort Pemberton as safety allowed, harassing our camps on James and John's islands, by the fire of their long-range rifled guns. The Isaac Smith, carrying nine heavy guns, was one of these. Desirous of putting a stop to such incursions, I called the commander of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
west of Fort Sumter; by constructing several batteries on the shell beach south-east of Fort Johnson; by mounting some heavy rifles, including 13-inch Blakely guns, upon the lower water-front of the city; by building a new battery at Mount Pleasant, and by the construction of ironclad rams. Ample preparations against a land attack were also made. On James Island strong works were built to close the approach from Stono River. Stono inlet and harbor were occupied by an inclosed fort on Cole's Island, which held under control all the anchorage ground and landing-place inside the Stono bar. This advanced position was abandoned by the enemy prior to the naval attack on Fort Sumter, giving us the possession of Folly Island and the lower Stono and inlet. The upper Stono was held by a heavily armed earth-work called Fort Pemberton, and the water approach to Charleston by Wappoo Cut, west of James Island Creek, was defended by powerful earth-works, while strong batteries on the eastern sh
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
sto River to assist General Hatch, who was moving on Wellstown with his division. On the 17th a movement was made from Stono River on the Confederates, while the iron-clads Lehigh, the Wissahickon and a mortar schooner were sent up the Stono to press the right flank of the enemy, while the gun-boat McDonough was sent with a mortar schooner up the Filly branch to bear on his left flank. General Schimmelfennig, in command of the troops before Charleston, moved on the enemy's front from Cole's Island. Admiral Dahlgren also sent orders to Lieutenant Hayward, commanding the battery of 11-inch guns on Cummings' Point, to open on Sullivan's Island and fire continuously through the night. The contiguous batteries were also put in operation by General Schimmelfennig, and the advance Monitors were ordered to open fire on Fort Moultrie. The cannonading during the night was sharp and continuous; the Confederates replied with a few guns from Fort Moultrie, but as the night wore on their fire
Junction, Va. 2 15 4 21 Proctor's Creek, Va. 8 106 145 259 Drewry's Bluff, Va. Strawberry Plains, Va. 1 5   6 Deep Bottom, Va. 6 50 25 81 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 4 23   27 Chaffin's Farm, Va.   1 1 2 Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1864 1 7   8 Fair Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 1 13 3 17 Fort Gregg, Va., April 2, 1865 14 58   72   Totals 120 498 288 906 Present, also, at Williamsburg; Bottom's Bridge; White Oak Swamp; Malvern Hill; Wood's Cross Roads; Cole's Island; Morris Island; Bermuda Hundred; Grover House; Hatcher's Run; Pursuit of Lee; Appomattox. notes.--The One Hundredth was recruited in Buffalo, and on March 7, 1862, started from there, 960 strong, arriving at Washington March 12th. It embarked on March 21st for Fort Monroe, where it joined General McClellan's Army, having been assigned to Naglee's (1st) Brigade, Casey's (2d) Division, Fourth Corps. Colonel Brown was killed at Fair Oaks, after which Colonel George B. Dandy, of the Regu<
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