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Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 134 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 108 0 Browse Search
Plato, Parmenides, Philebus, Symposium, Phaedrus 70 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 8 0 Browse Search
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Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
ry strong and of violent temper? for what will they do to us? We shall not care for that which they can do; and what we do care for, that they cannot do. How did Socrates behave with respect to these matters? Why, in what other way than a man ought to do who was convinced that he was a kinsman of the gods? If you say to me now, said Socrates to his judges,This passage is founded on and is in substance the same as that in Plato's Apology, c. 17. we will acquit you on the condition that you no longer discourse in the way in which you have hitherto discoursed, nor trouble either our young or our old men, I shall answer, you make yourselves ridiculous by thinkto keep and maintain it, and to resolve to die a thousand times rather than desert it; but if God has put us in any place and way of life, we ought to desert it. Socrates speaks like a mar who is really a kinsman of the gods. But we think about ourselves, as if we were only stomachs, and intestines, and shameful parts; we fear, w
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
thought both about things on the earth and heavenly things, but in a general way only, and not about things severally. There is a fifth class to whom Ulysses and Socrates belong, who say: I move not without thy knowledgeThe line is from the prayer of Ulysses to Athena: Hear me child of Zeus, thou who standest by me always in all dangers, nor do I even move without thy knowledge. Socrates said that the gods know everything, what is said and done and thought (Xenophon, Mem. i. 1, 19). Compare Cicero, De Nat. Deorum, i. 1, 2; and Dr. Price's Dissertation on Providence, sect. i. Epictetus enumerates the various opinions about the gods in antient times. The rea father. Cast him into prison. What prison? Where he is already, for he is there against his will; and where a man is against his will, there he is in prison. So Socrates was not in prison, for he was there willingly- Must my leg then be lamed? Wretch, do you then on account of one poor leg find fault with the world? Will you not
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
ndeed we shall see: but then even if a man should grant this, it is enough that logic has the power of distinguishing and examining other things, and, as we may say, of measuring and weighing them. Who says this? Is it only Chrysippus, and Zeno, and Cleanthes? And does not Antisthenes say so?Antisthenes who professed the Cynic philosophy, rejected Logic and Physic (Schweig. note p. 201). And who is it that has written that the examination of names is the beginning of education? And does not Socrates say so? And of whom does Xenophon write, that he began with the examination of names, what each name signified?Xenophon, Mem. iv. 5, 12, and iv. 6, 7. Epictetus knew what education ought to be. We learn language, and we ought to learn what it means. When children learn words, they should learn what the thing is which is signified by the word. In the case of children this can only be done imperfectly as to some words, but it may be done even then in some degree; and it must be done, or the w
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
it and wipe it; and for the sake of my oil flask, I drive a peg into the wall. Well then, are these things superior to me? No, but they supply some of my wants, and for this reason I take care of them. Well, do I not attend to my ass? Do I not wash his feet? Do I not clean him? Do you not know that every man has regard to himself, and to you just the same as he has regard to his ass? For who has regard to you as a man? Show me. Who wishes to become like you? Who imitates you, as he imitates Socrates?—But I can cut off your head.—You say right. I had forgotten that I must have regard to you, as I would to a feverFebris, fever, was a goddess at Rome. Upton refers to an inscrip- tion in Gruter 97, which begins Febri Divae. Compare Lactantius, De falsa religione, c. 20. and the bile, and raise an altar to you, as there is at Rome an altar to fever. What is it then that disturbs and terrifies the multitude? is it the tyrant and his guards? [By no means.] I hope that it is not so. It is not
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
the condition in which I am? I now begin to hate him. Why then do we build temples, why set up statues to Zeus, as well as to evil daemons, such as to Fever;See i. 19. 6, note 2. and how is Zeus the Saviour, and how the giver of rain, and the giver of fruits? And in truth if we place the nature of Good in any such things, all this follows. What should we do then? This is the inquiry of the true philosopher who is in labour.Upton refers to a passage in the Theaetetus (p. 150, Steph.), where Socrates professes that it is his art to discover whether a young man's mind is giving birth to an idol (an unreality) and a falsity, or to something productive and true; and he says (p. 151) that those who associate with him are like women in child-birth, for they are in labour and full of trouble nights and days much more than women, and his art has the power of stirring up and putting to rest this labour of child-birth. The conclusion in the chapter is not clear. The student is supposed to be add
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
his ruling faculty; for when a man knows that it is weak, then he will not employ it on things of the greatest difficulty. But at present, if men cannot swallow even a morsel, they buy whole volumes and attempt to devour them; and this is the reason why they vomit them up or suffer indigestion: and then come gripings, defluxes, and fevers.Seneca, De Tranquillitate animi, c. 9, says: What is the use of countless books and libraries, when the owner scarcely reads in his whole life the tables of contents? The number only confuses a learner, does not instruct him. It is much better to give yourself up to a few authors than to wander through many. Such men ought to consider what their ability is. In theory it is easy to convince an ignorant person; but in the affairs of real life no one offers himself to be convinced, and we hate the man who has convinced us. But Socrates advised us not to live a life which is not subjected to examination.See Plato's Apology, c. 28; and Antoninus, iii. 5.
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
eated by the Athenians. Slave, why do you say Socrates? Speak of the thing as it is: how strange that the poor body of Socrates should have been carried off and dragged to prison by stronger men, and should have given hemlock to the poor body of Socrates, and that it should breathe out the life. Do you on account of these things blame God? Had Socrates then no equivalent for these things? Where thshall we listen to, you or him? And what does Socrates say? Anytus and MelitusThe two chief prosecutors of Socrates (Plato, Apology, c. 18; Epictetus, ii 2, 15). can kill me, but they cannot hurt me:e sounds the signal for retreat, as he did to Socrates, we must obey him who gives the signal, as if charge of him in prison and was weeping when Socrates was going to drink the poison, and said, How he Phaedon of Plato (p. 116). The children of Socrates were brought in to see him before he took thehe died; and also the wives of the friends of Socrates who attended him to his death. Socrates had o[2 more...]
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
inion about it we employ carelessness, rashness and indifference. These things SocratesIn the Phaedon, c. 24, or p. 78. properly used to call tragic masks; for as to s of Wolf and Schweig. you will take them and blot them out. What then did not Socrates write? And who wrote so much?No other author speaks of Socrates having writtenSocrates having written any thing. It is therefore very difficult to explain this passage in which Arrian, who took down the words of Epictetus, represents him as saying that Socrates wroteSocrates wrote so much. Socrates talked much, and Epictetus may have spoken of talking as if it were writing; for he must have known that Socrates was not a writer. See Schweig.'s Socrates talked much, and Epictetus may have spoken of talking as if it were writing; for he must have known that Socrates was not a writer. See Schweig.'s note.—But how? As he could not always have at hand one to argue against his principles or to be argued against in turn, he used to argue with and examine himself, andSocrates was not a writer. See Schweig.'s note.—But how? As he could not always have at hand one to argue against his principles or to be argued against in turn, he used to argue with and examine himself, and he was always treating at least some one subject in a practical way. These are the things which a philosopher writes. But little dissertations and that method, which
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
tion, this your victory, this your peroration, this your applause (or the approbation which you will receive). Therefore Socrates said to one who was reminding him to prepare for his trial,Xenophon (Mem. iv. c. 8, 4) has reported this saying of SocraSocrates on the authority of Hermogenes. Compare the Apology of Xenophon near the beginning. Do you not think then that I have been preparing for it all my life? By what kind of preparation? I have maintained that which was in my own power. How then? I hasays that he can extract no sense out of this passage. I leave it as it is. For what do you think? do you think that, if Socrates had wished to preserve externals, he would have come forward and said: Anytus and Melitus can certainly kill me, but to not also say, 'I do not intreat;' unless there is a fit occasion to irritate purposely the judges, as was the case with Socrates. And you, if you are preparing such a peroration, why do you wait, why do you obey the order to submit to trial? For if
Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 2 (search)
me? But one will say, Throw; or Do not throw; and another will say, You have thrown once. This is quarrelling, not play. Socrates then knew how to play at ball. How? By using pleasantry in the court where he was tried. Tell me, he says, Anytus, how dai/mones), who are they, think you? Are they not sons of Gods, or compounded of gods and men? When Anytus admitted this, Socrates said, Who then, think you, can believe that there are mules (half asses), but not asses; and this he said as if he were playing at ball.In Plato's Apology c. 15, Socrates addresses Meletus; and he says, it would be equally absurd if a man should believe that there are foals of horses and asses, and should not believe that there are horses and asses. But Socrates says Socrates says nothing of mules, for the word mules in sore? texts of the Apology is manifestly wrong And what was the ball in that case? Life, chains, banishment, a draught of poison, separation from wife and leaving children orphans. These were the things with wh
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