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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Headquarters moved to Holly Springs-General McClernand in command-assuming command at Young's Point-operations above Vicksburg- fortifications about Vicksburg-the canal- Lake Providence-operations at Yazoo pass (search)
ransports. Relief had to come from another quarter. So I determined to get into the Yazoo below Fort Pemberton. Steel's Bayou [Steele's Bayou] empties into the Yazoo River between Haines' Bluff and its mouth. It is narrow, very tortuous, and Steele's Bayou] empties into the Yazoo River between Haines' Bluff and its mouth. It is narrow, very tortuous, and fringed with a very heavy growth of timber, but it is deep. It approaches to within one mile of the Mississippi at Eagle Bend, thirty miles above Young's Point. Steel's Bayou connects with Black Bayou, Black Bayou with Deer Creek, Deer Creek with RSteel's Bayou connects with Black Bayou, Black Bayou with Deer Creek, Deer Creek with Rolling Fork, Rolling Fork with the Big Sunflower River, and the Big Sunflower with the Yazoo River about ten miles above Haines' Bluff in a right line but probably twenty or twenty-five miles by the winding of the river. All these waterways are of corps. They took large river transports to Eagle Bend on the Mississippi, where they debarked and marched across to Steel's Bayou, where they re-embarked on the transports. The river steamers, with their tall smoke-stacks and light guards extendi
jor-General Edwin V. Summer died at Syracuse, N. Y., this morning.--The British steamer Nicholas I. was captured while attempting to run the blockade of Wilmington, N. C., by the gunboat Victoria.--A fight took place near Seneca, Pendleton County, Va., between a party of loyal men, called Swampers, and a force of rebels, resulting in the defeat of the Swampers. --Wheeling Intelligencer. A large force of Union troops, under the command of Generals Stuart and Sherman, in conjunction with the fleet of gunboats, under Admiral Porter, returned to the Yazoo, after a successful reconnoitring expedition to Steele's Bayou, Black Bayou, Muddy Bayou, and Deer Creek, Miss. In Deer Creek they were attacked in strong force by the enemy, but, after a contest of several hours' duration, he was driven off with considerable loss. The expedition destroyed two thousand bales of cotton, fifty thousand bushels of corn, and the houses and cotton-gins of the rebel planters along the route.--(Doc. 140.)
day of March, Admiral D. D. Porter, commanding Mississippi squadron, informed me that he had made a reconnoissance up Steele's Bayou, and partially through Black Bayou toward Deer Creek, and so far as explored, these water-courses were reported navig On the following morning I accompanied Admiral Porter in the ram Price, several iron-clads preceding us, up through Steele's Bayou, to near Black Bayou. At this time our forces were at a dead-lock at Greenwood, and I looked upon the success of t most of the force was sent up the Mississippi River to Eagle's Bend, a point where the river runs within one mile of Steele's Bayou, thus saving an important part of this difficult navigation. The expedition failed, probably more from want of knowlater and Tallahatchie, was next tried, but thwarted by a rebel fort at the head of the Yazoo. Another still, through Steele's Bayou and Rolling Fork, was then essayed, which beat a hasty retreat, and was lucky in escaping. Lastly, a canal leading
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
Robinson, of the Confederate States Engineers, on the overflowed bottom-lands of the Tallahatchie and Yallabusha rivers, near their junction [February 24th to April 8th]. Here General Loring, with 3 guns and about 1500 men, turned back a large fleet and land force, and won the sobriquet of Old Blizzards by standing on the cotton-bale parapet and shouting Give them blizzards, boys! Give them blizzards! Last of these flanking expeditions was one of General Sherman and Admiral Porter, via Steele's Bayou, to reach the Sunflower and Yazoo rivers, above Haynes's Bluff [March 14th-27th]. This came near being as disastrous as that by the Chickasaw Bayou, owing to obstructions made by the Confederates and to a sudden fall in the waters. Though these expeditions all failed, the desperate nature of most of them convinced us that General Grant was in deep earnest, and not easily discouraged. He made one more effort, which succeeded perhaps beyond his own most sanguine expectations. This had
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
March, before the Yazoo Pass expedition returned, Porter decided to try another route, through a series of narrow streams and bayous which made a circuitous connection between the Mississippi and the Sunflower, a tributary of the Yazoo River. Steele's Bayou was a sluggish stream which entered the Mississippi a few miles above the mouth of the Yazoo. Black Bayou, which was little better than a narrow ditch, connected Steele's Bayou with Deer Creek, a tortuous river with a difficult and shallow cSteele's Bayou with Deer Creek, a tortuous river with a difficult and shallow channel. A second lateral bayou, called Rolling Fork, connected Deer Creek with the Sunflower. From Rolling Fork the way was easy, but the difficulties of reaching that point were such that no commander with less than Porter's indefatigable energy and audacious readiness to take risks that promised a bare chance of success, would have ventured on the expedition. The flotilla, consisting of the remaining five Eads gun-boats, the Carondelet, Cincinnati, Louisville, Mound City, and Pittsburgh,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
idge, 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Carondelet, Com. Henry Walke (action with Arkansas, July 15th, 1862), Lieut. J. M. Murphy (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 15th, 1863, 11 guns; Cincinnati, Lieut.-Com. B. Wilson (Vicksburg, July, 1862), Lieut. George M. Bache (Arkansas Post, Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, May 27th), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Louisville, Com. B. M; Dove (Vicksburg, July, 1862), Lieut.-Com. E. K. Owen (Arkansas Post, Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf),Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; Mound City, Com. A. H. Kilty (St. Charles), Lieut.-Com. W. Gwin (Yazoo River Raid, Aug., ‘62), Lieut. B. Wilson (Steele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf, Warrenton), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 28, ‘63, 11 guns; July 26, ‘63,13 gSteele's Bayou, Vicksburg, and Grand Gulf, Warrenton), 13 guns, 1 howitzer; May 28, ‘63, 11 guns; July 26, ‘63,13 guns; Pittsburgh, Act.V. Lieut. W. R. Hoel, 13 guns; Sept., ‘62,12 guns, 1 howitzer; May 18, ‘63, 13 guns; Dec., ‘63,14 guns. later iron-Clads.--Choctaw (turret), Lieut.-Com. F. M. Ramsay (Haynes's Bluff, Yazoo River, Yazoo City, Milliken'
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
s attention was turned alternately to the Canal that General Williams attempted to cut, See page 527. Milliken's Bend, Lake Providence, the Yazoo Pass, and Steele's Bayou. All of these routes were tried, as we shall observe, before in another way he achieved the desired end. It was determined first to complete Williams's cag, were advantages to be gained by a successful movement to the Yazoo, and Grant determined to attempt it. He accompanied Porter in person March 15, 1863. up Steele's Bayou in the ram Price, preceded by several armored gun-boats, and, turning into the Black Fork, that led to Deer Creek and the Sunflower through the Rolling Fork, apture or destroy the fleet. Grant hastened back to Young's Point, and ordered a pioneer force and a division of Sherman's corps to push across Eagle Bend to Steele's Bayou (there only a mile from the Mississippi), to the relief of Porter, and to assist in the labors of the expedition. While these were slowly progressing again
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 27: expedition through Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. (search)
Chapter 27: expedition through Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. The naval expedition through the woods. scenes and incidents. through black and Steele's Bayou. a hazardous journey. destruction of cotton and other property by the Confederates. a skirmish with tree cuttemoke-stacks. From Black Bayou, the gun-boats turned again into Steele's Bayou, a channel just one foot wider than the vessels, and here came xpedition. The point where the gun-boats would have to leave Steele's Bayou to get into the Rolling Fork was so blocked up that it would ta almost smashed to pieces while rebounding from tree to tree in Steele's Bayou. On the 26th of March. the fleet arrived at its old anchorad the fact that they had been employed to cut down the trees on Steele's Bayou, thereby to hem in the gun-boats, was a good reason for taking Mississippi--a thing much more easily done than getting through Steele's Bayou. Whether they were influenced by these ideas or not, they pr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
to the rapid fire of shells, shrapnel, grape and canister from the gun-boats, the sharpshooters were glad to lay low, and the men at the great guns gave up in disgust when they saw the fleet drift on apparently unscathed. They must have known that Vicksburg was doomed, for if the fleet got safely below the batteries their supplies of provisions from Texas would be cut off and they would have to depend on what they could receive from Richmond. General Steele had been sent up to the Steele's Bayou region to destroy all the provisions in that quarter, and Pemberton knew that if Grant's Army once got below Vicksburg it would eat up everything in the way of food between Warrenton and Bruensburg. Although the squadron was under fire from the time of passing the first battery until the last vessel got by, a period of two hours and thirty minutes, the vessels were struck in their hulls but sixty-eight times by shot and shells, and only fifteen men were wounded. At 2.30 A. M., all th
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
n by repeating the eulogistic terms in which Mr. Secretary Welles speaks of them: In the appendix to this report (1863) will be found correct records of the extraordinary adventures attending the efforts to get control of the Yazoo, by sweeping from the channel the net-work of torpedoes, explosive machines, and contrivances of submarine warfare, near its confluence with the Mississippi. These efforts were followed by the novel and singular Yazoo Pass expedition and the expedition of Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. On the right bank of the Mississippi scenes of interest were enacted by the hardy sailors and boatmen in the rivers of Arkansas and northern Louisiana. The Cumberland and Tennessee have been actively patrolled by our vigilant and skillful naval officers; and the exciting chase of Morgan, by our steamers on the Ohio, over a distance of five hundred miles, intercepting him and his band when attempting to escape, naturally attracted the attention of the country. But the
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