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The siege of Charleston. --The Charleston Courier, of Thursday last, has the following: The Yankees are reported actively engaged throwing up a heavy work on the end of Long Island touching the creek from Secessionville to Folly river, and opposite Secessionville. A derrick boat was also observed at the Inlet on Tuesday, and the Yankees engaged in landing heavy guns from a schooner upon Oyster Point. One of the Yankee gunboats in Stono shelled John's Island for a short time on Tuesday. They succeeded in carrying off the two howitzers left behind by our troops last Friday, and incorrectly reported by passengers as having been recovered. One of the Timbers was left behind. The enemy are again busy at Gregg. On Wednesday morning the embrasure for the 10-inch Columbiad bearing on Fort Sumter was reopened. It is believed that the old fort will soon be treated to another storm of shells. Since Tuesday afternoon the enemy, with two barges, have been dragging
The Daily Dispatch: January 22, 1864., [Electronic resource], The recent Engagement in Stono river. (search)
The recent Engagement in Stono river. --A Yankee letter from on board the Marblehead, a gunboat recently attacked by the Confederates in Stono river, seems to think that if the rebels had held on a little longer, and not run when they did, they might have captured the boat and the Yankee troops at Legareville. Three of the crew were killed and two wounded. The letter says: We were struck twenty times, every shot passing through the ship or masts, and the deck was covered with splinStono river, seems to think that if the rebels had held on a little longer, and not run when they did, they might have captured the boat and the Yankee troops at Legareville. Three of the crew were killed and two wounded. The letter says: We were struck twenty times, every shot passing through the ship or masts, and the deck was covered with splinters and blood. A rifle-shot struck the ship at the steerage, and, passing through made a perfect lumber room of it. The hole through the ship was as large as a hat, and much broken, and the shot passing through broke up two of the berths on the starboard side and store own the curtains, and, going on, struck the solid floor, making a long hole in it a foot wide. The shot then passed over to the engineer's side, breaking to atoms the glass, and passed through the lockers of the other two engi
d to Big Shanty from in front of Gen. Hardee's Corps — their loss along the line of that corps is estimated at four thousand, and about the same in front of Gen. Loring's. The Yankee Generals Dan. McCook and Harker were certainly killed. Charleston. The latest advices we have from Charleston are to the 25th ult, the three hundred and fifty third day of the "siege." Matters were progressing pretty much as usual, and the city and Fort Sumter continued to hurl back defiance to the insolent foe. Fifty-six shots were fired at the city during the twenty-four hours ending at six o'clock on the previous evening. A desultory fire had also been kept up between battery Gregg and our batteries on Sullivan's and Janies Islands. Heavy firing was heard in the direction of Stono, which was believed to have been the enemy's gunboats shelling Secessionville. The working parties work still busy on the lower batteries and battery Wagner. There had been no further change in the fleet.
er. Nothing transpired yesterday to confirm the report that a force of the enemy had appeared at Yellow Tavern, in Hanover county, and it is believed to have been without foundation. From Charleston. The following official dispatch, received yesterday at the War Department, comprises all the intelligence we have from Charleston: Charleston, July 10, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper, A. and I. General: Yesterday morning Gen. Robertson attacked the enemy on John's Island, near Stono, and drove them from their first position, with a loss to us of over one hundred killed and wounded. Last night and this morning the enemy fell back to their transports, near Legareville, and passed over to James and Morris Islands. Two monitors and several gunboats are still in the Stone, but have been driven by our batteries beyond effective range. One monitor believed seriously damaged by shot from one of our Brooke guns. Movements this evening indicate a purpose of a change of point of
missiles upon it since Sunday Nothing worthy of note occurred on James's Island on Wednesday. On the morning of that day a fight took place on John's Island, that was conducted on our part by the Marion Artillery and a portion of Col. Harrison's regiment. The enemy was severely punished. Thursday afternoon the enemy on John's Island assaulted our lines with spirit three several times, but he was buried back with heavy loss. Through the whole of Friday the monitors and mortar boats in Stono threw shot and shell at Battery Pringle, that fort replying with marked effect from its Brooke gun. Saturday was ushered in by the roll of musketry and the deeper sound of light artillery, betokening a severe fight at John's Island. The result of that battle was a decisive and glorious victory. The soon of Sunday witnessed the monitors and other war craft in their former positions in our outer harbor, the enemy the night before having retired from John's Island. A short time afte
same time, we do not know that it is true. For the present all communication with Augusta is cut off, and we do not know what is going on there, or in that neighborhood. As concerns matters at Charleston and in the direction of Columbia, our information is more definite. The enemy, with a force of three thousand men, landed at Grimball's, on James's island, last Friday, and drove in our pickets. Some skirmishing followed, but there was no general engagement.--Grimball's is on the Stono river, two miles southwest of Charleston, and the Ashley river, a wide stream, lies between it and the city. This demonstration of the enemy is believed to be a feint. The following dispatch, received late Sunday night, is the official report of this affair. It contains also other interesting intelligence: "Charleston, February 11, 1865. "To General S. Cooper, "Adjutant and Inspector General: "The enemy, last evening, drove in our pickets on James's island. The lines have
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