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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedoes. (search)
tion of least resistance. While other nations are pursuing the science of assault and defence theoretically and experimentally, the United States has had more practical experience with the torpedo, and better understands its capabilities, wisely discarding the iron and steel leviathians of the deep for models, as the Dreadnaught, Inflexible, Devastation, Alexandria, Iron Duke, Duillio, &c. During the war with the Confederacy, there were 123 torpedoes planted in Charleston harbor and Stono river, which prevented the capture of that city and its conflagration. There were 101 torpedoes planted in Roanoke river, North Carolina, by which, of twelve vessels sent with troops and means to capture Fort Branch, but five returned. One was sunk by the fire from the fort, and the rest by torpedoes. Of the five iron-clads sent with other vessels to take Mobile, Alabama (one was tin-clad), three were destroyed by torpedoes. There were fifty-eight vessels sunk by torpedoes in the war, and s