Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Stono River (South Carolina, United States) or search for Stono River (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: condition of the Navy at the beginning of the war. (search)
rations of this nature were extended as the means at hand permitted; it may be readily supposed, however, that until the capture of Port Royal, at least, it was rather nominal than real. If vessels were captured, even in entering the principal ports, it was due rather to the stupidity of the persons attempting to run the blockade than to the effectiveness of the force employed to prevent it. Should a vessel of ordinary or light draught be desired to reach Charleston, she could be taken into Stono, or North Edisto Inlets, or into any of the channels of St. Helena, or into Port Royal Harbor, and from thence in a few hours find her way into Charleston; and if desired to reach Savannah, and fearing to approach Tybee Bar, she could enter either Warsaw or Ossabaw Sound, and find her way to her destination without difficulty. To prevent all this, and eventually, effectively as far as possible, and for securing a military base of operations it was essential that a good port on the Southern
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
abandoned. Arriving at noon of November 24th, he found the bar quite rough and the ranges for crossing it destroyed. He therefore went on board of the vessel having the least draught, crossed the bar, and shelled the earthworks without receiving a reply. A closer examination showed that they had been abandoned and dismantled, as was found to be the case at all of the points along the coast within ready and an unembarrassed attack by the gunboats, with the exception of the little inlet of Stono, close to Charleston, and of course the defences of that city and of Savannah. While Commander Rodgers was making his reconnoissance in one direction, other officers with proper vessels were sent elsewhere, with the same objects and like results. Commander Drayton in the Pawnee, to which he had been transferred, accompanied by the Pembina and the coast survey steamer Vixen, entered St. Helena Sound on the morning of the 26th. On the point of Otter Island was found an abandoned bastioned
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: the Monitor class of vessels. (search)
ts or ships. By April 13th all of the monitors had been sent to Port Royal for repairs, and as fast as finished were sent to North Edisto, the inland waters of which were contiguous, and actually afforded a better base for menacing or taking Charleston than Morris or Sullivan's Island. Had both of these islands been in possession of the National forces, Charleston would certainly have been a sealed port, but so far as its attack from a land force was concerned, even then an approach from Stono and North Edisto would have been more practicable, considering the support derivable from guns afloat. The admiral had reason to suppose that at any day the monitor force, with the exception of two vessels, would be ordered to the Mississippi, and so it was held in expectancy. Definite information was obtained of the approaching readiness of the ram Atlanta to leave Savannah, with the intention of sweeping the coast of the weak vessels that for the most part maintained the blockade. The
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
ished by troops. As a part of the operations against Charleston, the command of General A. H. Terry was sent up the Stono River to make a diversion. The Pawnee, Commander G. B. Balch; the McDonough, Lieutenant-Commanding Bacon; and the Marbleheaew minutes that intervened until boats were at hand for their rescue. As the reader will have already observed, the Stono River was frequently a scene of contention between batteries and gunboats; again on Christmas day, at 6 A. M., we find an atover the exit of a large quantity of cotton. This led to some strategic movements on the part of the army along the Stono River, aided by a naval force in those waters. These operations were concluded on the 9th of July, after which General Fostetter to the admiral says: I take pleasure in informing you of the excellent practice by your gunboats and monitors on Stono River yesterday. They drove the enemy out of his rifle-pits, and prevented him from erecting an earthwork which he had com