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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 36 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) or search for Telegraph (New Mexico, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The wounding and death of General J. E. B. Stuart-several errors corrected. (search)
whole line at the same time. As he always did, the General hastened to the point where the greatest danger threatened — the point against which the enemy directed the mounted charge. My horse was so much exhausted by my severe ride of the morning that I could not follow him, but Captain Dorsey gave the particulars that follow. The enemy's charge captured our battery on the left of our line, and drove back almost the entire left. Where Captain Dorsey was stationed — immediately on the Telegraph road — about eighty men had collected together, and among these the General threw himself, and by his personal example held them steady while the enemy charged entirely past their position. With these men he fired into their flank and rear, as they passed him, in advancing and in retreating, for they were met by a mounted charge of the First Virginia cavalry and driven back some distance. As they retired. one man, who had been dismounted in the charge and was running out on foot, turned<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. (search)
21st Ewell moves to our right and takes position along the Po. During the day the enemy is ascertained to be retiring from A. P. Hill's front. We prepare to move. Move in the afternoon by Dickerson's to the Mud Tavern, and thence down the Telegraph road, Ewell preceding us. Hill takes a western road. The supply trains and heavy baggage wagons moving via New Market, Chilesburg and Island Ford. We march all night, halting on the Telegraph road at 3 A. M. on the 22d. After two hours rest Telegraph road at 3 A. M. on the 22d. After two hours rest the march is resumed. The head of our column reaches the Northanna at 12.15 P. M., May 22d. Corse's and Kemper's brigades, Pickett's division, join us. Barton with Hill's column temporarily. Troops are put in bivouac on the south side of Northanna. May 23d Enemy reported advancing down Telegraph road. Our line is formed. The guard on the north side of the river is driven across. In the afternoon we sustain a severe cannonade, and have a chimney knocked over our party. At night the l
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
ng the battle of Fredericksburg as headquarters), crosses the plain in its northerly course to the river. The Narrow Gauge railroad to Orange Courthouse and the Telegraph road to Spotsylvania Courthouse, twelve miles away to the south, take advantage of this opening to get through the hills. Lower down Deep run crosses the flats en. A third assault was ordered, and was successful. We lost eight pieces of artillery upon that and the adjacent heights. Barksdale and Hays retired down the Telegraph road, and the enemy's advance was checked by Early, who sent three regiments of Gordon's brigade to reinforce them. Wilcox threw himself in front of Sedgwick'eived a note from General McLaws assenting to the plan and containing General Lee's approval of it too. Early on the morning of the 4th, Early advanced along the Telegraph road, regaining Marye's and the adjacent hills, but he could not hear McLaws' guns. McLaws says in his report that he agreed to advance, provided Early would at