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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 30, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 33: the East Tennessee campaign. (search)
e little streams called First, Second, and Third Creeks, from the upper to the lower suburbs of the city,--First Creek between the city and East Knoxville, or Temperance Hill; Second Creek between the city and College Hill; Third Creek below and outside the enemy's lines of defence. The plateau slopes down to the valley through wht Loudon, above the Kingston road, and about a thousand yards in front of the college. East from that point it was about parallel with the river, reaching to Temperance Hill, to Mabry's Hill, and to the Holston, below the glass-works. An interior line extended from Temperance Hill to Flint Hill on the east, and another on the wesTemperance Hill to Flint Hill on the east, and another on the west, between the outer line and Second Creek. Dams were built across First and Second Creeks, flooding and forming formidable wet ditches over extensive parts of the line. Abatis, chevaux-de-frise, and wire entanglements were placed where thought to be advantageous for the defenders. The heights on the northeast across the rive
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 34: Besieging Knoxville. (search)
o haul them. They were brought up, and communication between the detachment and main force was made easy. The brigades of Law and Robertson were left on the east (or south) side as guard for that battery. The Union forces were posted from left to right,--the Ninth Corps, General R. D. Potter commanding. General Ferrero's division extended from the river to Second Creek; General Hartranft's along part of the line between Second and First Creeks; Chapin's and Reilly's brigades over Temperance Hill to near Bell's house, and the brigades of Hoskins and Casement to the river. The interior line was held by regiments of loyal Tennesseeans recently recruited. The positions on the south (or east) side of the river were occupied by Cameron's brigade of Hascall's division and Shackelford's cavalry (dismounted), Reilly's brigade in reserve,--two sections of Wilder's battery and Konkle's battery of four three-inch rifle guns. The batteries of the enemy's front before the city were Ro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Knoxville. (search)
r, afterward known as Fort Huntington Smith, on Temperance Hill in East Knoxville. These plans were approved beast of First Creek, upon an elevation known as Temperance Hill. East of Temperance Hill, and separated from iTemperance Hill, and separated from it by a depression in the ridge, is Mabry's Hill, the highest ground on the north side of the Holston within canmmediately upon the bank of the river, south of Temperance Hill. Third Creek, a little more than a mile westwane continued along the crest of the bluff, over Temperance Hill to Mabry's Hill, a distance of 2400 yards, inclt west of First Creek, Fort Huntington Smith on Temperance Hill, Battery Clifton Lee and Battery Stearman in the depression between Temperance Hill and Mabry's Hill, and Fort Hill on the extreme easterly point of Mabry's H considerable obstacles, especially in front of Temperance Hill, where the line was parallel with the course ofaround the college. Another line extended from Temperance Hill to Flint Hill, terminating in Battery Fearns.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
nds on a table-land, 150 feet above the river, about a mile square in area. On the northeast is a small creek, running through a deep ravine, beyond which is Temperance Hill. Still farther to the east is Mayberry Hill. On the northwest the table-land slopes down to a broad valley, along which lies. the railway. On the southwesge Hill was fortified with a. strong work carrying a piece of siege artillery. On the height near the Summit House was another work. There were two forts on Temperance Hill, and on each of two other eminences near was a battery. On the principal height, south of the Holston, was a fort, and in the town, near the street leading trnside's engineers. Under Poe's hands, said a participant, rifle-pits appear as if by magic, and every hill-top of the vast semicircle around Knoxville, from Temperance Hill to College Hill, is frowning with cannon and bristling with bayonets. Equally gallant was the reception of the same force, which dashed up in advance of Lon
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
eutenant Galpin, Second Michigan. Fort Comstock, on Summit Hill, in memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Comstock, Seventeenth Michigan. Battery Wiltsie, west of Gay Street, in memory of Captain Wiltsie, Twentieth Michigan. Fort Huntington Smith, on Temperance Hill, in memory of Lieutenant Huntington Smith, Twentieth Michigan. Battery Clifton Lee, east of Fort H. Smith, in memory of Captain Clifton Lee, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Mounted Infantry. Fort Hill, at the extreme eastern point of the Unl, in memory of Lieutenant and Adjutant C. W. Fearns, Forty-fifth Ohio Mounted Infantry. Battery Zoellner, between Fort Sanders and Second Creek, in memory of Lieutenant Frank Zoellner, Second Michigan. Battery Stearman, in the gorge between Temperance Hill and Mabrey's Hill, in memory of Lieutenant William Stearman, Thirteenth Kentucky. Fort Stanley, comprising all the works on the central hill on the south side of the river, in memory of Captain C. B. Stanley, Forty-fifth Ohio Mounted Infantr
-pits appear as if by magic. Every house-top of the vast semicircle around Knoxville, from Temperance Hill to Rebel Point and College Hill, is frowning with cannon and bristling with bayonets. It ws, hogs, and horses cover the valleys and hill-sides in inconceivable numbers. Standing on Temperance Hill, and looking toward the town, the innumerable campfires, like myriads of fiery stars, the p hundred yards to the left of the Clinton Railroad, bore upon the works of Fort Sanders and Temperance Hill forts. These last two works commanded the gorge of the railroad running north from the citteers, who was mortally wounded in our lines during the siege. Fort Huntington Smith--On Temperance Hill, in memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Huntington Smith, Twentieth Michigan volunteer infantry, wanders, on the morning of November twenty-fourth. Battery Stearman--In the gorge between Temperance Hill and Mabrey's Hill, in memory of Lieutenant William Stearman, Thirteenth Kentucky volunteers
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
ise, and a Siege of Knoxville. relative of President Davis. The reconnoissances developed the enemy holding a very strong defensive line with but a single weak point. This was the northwest salient angle where their north and south line, running perpendicular to the river below the town, made a right angle and turning to the east ran parallel with the river to the northeast of the town. There it rested, behind an extensive inundation of First Creek, upon a strong enclosed work on Temperance Hill, mounting 12 guns, with outlying works upon Mabry's and Flint Hills. These had been built, with several other works, during the prior Confederate occupation, and one, enclosing three sides of a rectangle about 125 by 95 feet with bastion fronts, the rear being open, had been nearly completed at the northwest salient angle above referred to. This was now called Fort Sanders, after the general killed on the 18th, and every exertion was used to complete and strengthen it, all able-bodie
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
the overflow; in the rear several batteries for field artillery were built and connected by strong breastworks. The eastern face seemed to be but little exposed, for the First Creek formed along a length of fifteen hundred yards an obstacle which would have cut in two all the lines the besiegers might have tried to establish. Still, the three heights to the eastward of Knoxville had been fortified; a large work of defence, closed at the gorge, rose from the principal elevation, called Temperance Hill. Colonel Babcock had applied himself particularly to the defence of the western face. In the centre of it were old Confederate works which after the death of Sanders received the name of that gallant soldier. Situated at a little over half a mile from the city, upon a commanding rise of ground between the railway and the London road, Fort Sanders was open at the gorge, and composed of three bastioned fronts facing north-west, south-west, and south-east. It formed the salient point
red behind his line of fortifications near Knoxville. Longstreet soon hemmed the old tyrant in the city, with but few supplies for his thieving bands. But the city is well fortified. College Hill is fortified with a heavy fort, carrying a sledge piece of artillery. Another fort is thrown up on the hills near the Summit House. The hill on the right of the street leading from the public square to the depot has a strong fort.--Near the Humphrey's is another. The hill known as Temperance Hill has two heavy forts. Another rise, near Prof. Kirkpatrick's, has two batteries.--The heights south of Knoxville are also fortified, and connected with these immense fortifications is one continuous line of rifle pits and breastworks from the extreme east of Knoxville on the river to the west on the river. Hence you can form some conception of the strength of the enemy's position. They are completely invested on this side of the river. Their only mode of procuring any supplies is fro