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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 10 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Tombigbee River (United States) or search for Tombigbee River (United States) in all documents.

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possible, on the country they traversed. The rear of the column did not actually leave the Tennessee till the 22d. The general course pursued was south-east, through Russellville, Jasper, and Elyton; but the command was divided, and from time to time expanded and contracted; passing hurriedly over war-wasted north Alabama, and then spreading out so as to sweep over a broad stretch of the plenteous region watered by the tributaries of the Black Warrior and other main affluents of the Tombigbee river: thus menacing at once Columbus, Miss., Tuskaloosa, and Selma, Alabama. Forrest, commanding the chief Rebel force left in this quarter, was at West Point, near Columbus, Miss.; so that Wilson, moving rapidly on several roads, passed his right and reached Elyton March 30. without a collision; destroying by the way many extensive iron-works, collieries, &c., and pushing the few Rebel cavalry found at Elyton rapidly across the Cahawba at Montevallo; where the enemy was first encounte
t Citronelle, May 4, as the result of negotiations commenced April 19. More words were used; but the terms were essentially the same as had been accorded to Lee and Johnston, with this addition: Transportation and subsistence to be furnished at public cost for the officers and men, after surrender, to the nearest practicable point to their homes. Com. Farrand, at the same time and on the same terms, surrendered to Rear-Admiral Thatcher the twelve Rebel gunboats blockaded in the Tombigbee river, with 20 officers and 110 others. Mr. Jefferson Davis, with his staff and civilian associates, having journeyed by rail from Richmond to Danville, April 3. he there halted, and set up his Government; issuing April 5. thence a stirring proclamation, designed to inspirit the Confederates to a determined prosecution of the contest; saying: We have now entered upon a new phase of the struggle. Relieved from the necessity of guarding particular points, our army will be fre
bards vicksburg, 578; at Ship Island, 83; at months of the Mississippi, 84-85; 86; his attack on and passage of defenses below New Orleans, 88 to 94; his forces occupy the city, 95-6; his reply to Mayor Monroe, 96; at Baton Rouge, 101; his fleet runs by Vicksburg batteries, 101; 102; bombards Donaldsonville, 102; returns to New Orleans, 102; at the capture of Port Hudson, 332; assails Forts Morgan and Gaines, Mobile bay, 651. Farrand, Comr., surrenders to Rear-Admiral Fletcher on the Tombigbee river, 754. Fayetteville, N. C., taken by Sherman, 633. Fayetteville, Ark., Cabell defeated at, 448. Featherston, Brig.-Gen. W. S., wounded at Glendale, 163. Federal Government, its right to subdue resistance to its authority, 232. Ferrero, Brig.-Gen. Edward, in attack on Roanoke Island, 76; defends Fort Sanders, 432. field, Brig.-Gen., at second Bull Run, 189. Fish, Col., 16th La., killed at Stone River, 282. Florida, contributions to the Confederate army in, 459; Gen