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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 8, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 1, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 2 0 Browse Search
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along the beach; but, being baffled by a storm, with high winds and sea, he determined to flank the enemy's rigit. To this end, Cox's and Ames's divisions were thrown across the Cape Fear to Smithville, where they were joined by Moore's brigade of Couch's division, just debarked, and directed to envelop Fort Anderson. The enemy, detecting this movement, hastily abandoned Feb. 19. that fort and his lines facing ours, leaving to us 10 heavy guns and much ammunition, and fell back behind Town creek, where he had intrenched; and where he was assailed Feb. 20. next day by Gen. Terry: Gen. Cox, crossing the creek in a flat-boat, striking him in flank and rear, and routing him; capturing 375 men and 2 guns. Cox now rebuilt the bridge which Hoke had burned, drew over his guns, and started next morning for Wilmington; crossing, on Rebel pontoons, the Brunswick to Eagle island; thence threatening to cross the Cape Fear above the city. Gen. Terry, still on the peninsula, had hitherto
oroa, Ala., 687. Seviersville, Tenn., 623. Shelbyville, Tenn., 409. Shenandoah, Va., 605. Shepherdstown, Md., 393. Solemn Grove, N. C., 705. Somerset, Ky., 427. Somerville, Tenn., 616. South Mills, N. C., 80 Spring Hill, Tenn., 284. Springfield, Mo., 447. Springfield, W. Va., 599. St. Charles, Ark., 554. Stony Creek, Va., 588. Strasburg, Va., 612. Suffolk, Va., 366. Sutherlands Depot, Va., 734. Talladega, Ala., 631. Tebb's Bend, Ky., 404. Thoroughfare Gap, Va., 183. Town Creek, N. C., 715. Trevilian's, Va., 582. Tunnel Hill, Ga., 618. Tupelo. Miss., 622. Turner's Gap, Md., 196. Tuseumbia, Ala., 285. Union City, Tenn., 618. Upperville, Va., 373. Valverde, N. M., 22. Washington City, 605. Washington, N. C., 482. Wauhatchie, Tenn., 434. Waynesboroa, Ga., 727. Weldon Road. Va., 592. West Point, Ga., 720. White Oak Ridge, Ga., 445. White Oak Road, Va., 731. Williston Station, S. C., 704. Wilson's Wharf, Va., 584. Winchester, Va., 135; do., do.,
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 16: (search)
General Sherman speaks repeatedly of Generals Schofield and Terry as if they were independent commanders, and says: Wilmington was captured by General Terry on the 22d of February. Accurately, General Terry's forces formed a portion of the command of General Schofield, and advanced on Wilmington upon the left bank of the Cape Fear River, while the Twenty-Third Corps formed the other part of Schofield's army, and advanced on the right bank of the river. General J. D. Cox's troops of this latter corps, with one division of Terry's troops, assisted by the fleet, drove the enemy out of Fort Anderson, and then by secretly passing Casement's brigade in flats over Town Creek near its mouth, General Cox secured the main crossing over that strongly guarded stream, and opened the way to the rear of Wilmington, which, as a consequence, was immediately evacuated. As General Schofield directed all the movements, a careful writer would have said Wilmington was captured by General Schofield.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
7-28. Detached duty at New York City during Election of 1864 November 4-17. Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., December 7-27. 2nd Expedition to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 3-15, 1865. Assault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Town Creek February 19-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. lifton, Tenn., January 2-6, 1865. Movement to Washington, D. C.; thence to Fort Fisher, N. C., January 16-February 7. Arrive at Fort Fisher, N. C., February 7. Operations against Hoke February 11-14. Fort Anderson February 18-19. Town Creek February 19-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Gulley's March 31. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation
Movement to Washington, D. C., thence to North Carolina January 16-February 9. Operations against Hoke, near Fort Fisher, N. C., February 11-14. Near Sugar Loaf Battery February 11. Fort Anderson, Cape Fear River, February 18-19. Town Creek February 19-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14. Tenn., till January 15, 1865. Movement to Washington, D. C., thence to Federal Point, N. C., January 15-February 9. Operations against Hoke near Fort Fisher February 11-14. Orton's Pond February 18. Fort Anderson February 18-19. Town Creek February 19-20. Capture of Wilmington February 22. Campaign of the Carolinas March 1-April 26. Advance on Goldsboro March 6-21. Occupation of Goldsboro March 21. Advance on Raleigh April 10-14. Occupation of Raleigh April 14.
d by his cavalry of General Cox's movement, hastily abandoned his works on both sides of the river during the night of February nineteenth, and fell back behind Town creek on the west, and to a corresponding position, covered by swamps, on the east. We thus gained possession of the main defences of Cape Fear river and of Wilmington, with ten pieces of heavy ordnance and a large amount of ammunition. Our loss was but trifling. On the following day General Cox pursued the enemy to Town creek, behind which he was found intrenched, and had destroyed the only bridge. General Terry also encountered the enemy in his new postion, and in force superior to Gen Terry's. General Ames' division was recrossed to the east bank and joined General Terry on the night of the nineteenth. On the twentieth General Cox crossed Town creek below the enemy's position, by the use of a single flat boat found in the stream, and by wading through swamps reached the enemy's flank and rear, attacked and
ingman, and still further the Georgia brigade of General Colquitt. For tedious weeks the great guns of the mighty fleet, close in upon the left flank, and the sharpshooters in front, made no impression upon General Hoke and his men. General Schofield, however, came to reinforce his lieutenant, and the landing of his forces made necessary the evacuation of Forts Caswell, Holmes, Campbell, Pender and Anderson. The garrisons from these forts and part of Hagood's brigade became engaged at Town creek, and for some time gallantly defied all efforts to push them aside. By the 7th of March, Hoke was near Kinston and part of the Southern army was at Smithfield. On that date Gen. D. H. Hill was ordered to take his own division and Pettus' brigade of Stevenson's division and move to Hoke's position for battle. Clayton's division of Lee's corps and the Junior reserves under Baker soon after reported to General Hill. On the 8th, Generals Hoke and Hill engaged the corps of General Cox, sta
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
was captured, took part in the defense of Fort Anderson and the fight at Town Creek, N. C., was in charge of the rear guard of the Eleventh regiment at Northeast rit Manassas (taking part in the final charge), Secessionsville, S. C., and Town Creek, N. C. He was captured on July 7, 1863, while on scouting duty near Charleston, f of Col. C. H. Simonton, as acting adjutant-general; and after the battle of Town Creek was assigned to the command of the remnants of the Twenty-fifth and Twenty-seom June 18, 1864, to September, 1864, and from thence into North Carolina, at Town Creek, Kinston and Bentonville. After the war he returned home with $1.25 in his pcommand he served, with promotion to first sergeant, until he was captured at Town creek, N. C. Subsequently he was held as a prisoner of war at Point Lookout until Jall Junction, Reams' Station, in Virginia; and in North Carolina the fight at Town creek, where he was captured. For fifty-seven days he fought in the trenches befor
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
; 82, 11; 85, 34; 100, 1; 137, A4 Engagement, Oct. 9, 1864 69, 3 Tortugas Islands, Fla. 171 Totopotomoy Creek, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 19, 1; 20, 1; 21, 9; 22, 1; 55, 5; 63, 8; 74, 1; 81, 3; 83, 3; 92, 1; 96, 6; 100, 1, 100, 2; 137, E8 Operations on line of the, May 28-31, 1864 55, 5; 83, 3; 96, 6 Towaliga, Ga. 70, 1; 101, 21; 143, G1; 144, C2 Towaliga River, Ga. 69, 5; 70, 1; 101, 21; 143, F1; 144, B1, 144, C2; 148, B14 Town Creek, Ala. 24, 3 Town Creek, N. C. 105, 8; 138, D7; 142, E13 Townsend's Ferry, W. Va. 9, 3 Tracy City, Tenn. 24, 3; 34, 5; 97, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, C9 Vicinity of, 1863 34, 5 Trans-Alleghany Department (C): Boundaries 166-168 Trans-Mississippi Department (C): Boundaries 165-171 Transportation, means of, for sick and wounded, etc.: Illustrations 174 Tranter's Creek, N. C. 138, E9 Travisville, Tenn. 9, 2; 24, 3; 150, F10 Treadwell's, Miss. 51,
hat covered the rebel right, to strike the road to Wilmington, in rear of the fort. The rebels were warned of the movement by their cavalry, and, during the night of the 19th of February, they hastily abandoned their works, falling back behind Town creek, about four miles below the city. Possession was thus secured of the principal defences of Cape Fear river and Wilmington, with ten heavy guns and large quantities of ammunition. During these operations the fleet had kept up a constant fire from the river, but no gun was dismounted in Fort Anderson. Ames's division was now returned to Terry, and on the 20th, Cox again advanced, on the western bank. He succeeded in crossing Town creek by a single flat-boat found in the stream, and, wading the swamps, he reached the enemy's flank and rear, attacked and routed him at once, capturing two pieces of artillery and three hundred and seventyfive prisoners. During the night he rebuilt the bridge which the rebels had burned, and in the m
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