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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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wounded, as were several of their leading subordinates. After firing some of the buildings whence they were thus assailed, our men, abandoning their dead and wounded, fell back two miles and encamped; starting for home, under Lt.-Col. Franklin, 34th Ohio, early next morning. Hungry, worn out, and dispirited, they lost nearly half their horses on their devious way homeward: wending from early dawn till midnight over the roughest mountains, and being four days without food, till they struck Tug fork the second night, where they found and killed some cattle. Misled by a treacherous guide, they wasted next day wandering through the mountains, finding July 23. rations and feed at Fayetteville; having ridden over 400 miles, lost 83 men, with at least 300 horses, and endured as much misery as could well be crowded into a profitless raid of eight days. Gen. W. W. Averill, setting forth from Huttonsville, Randolph county, moved (down the line dividing West from old Virginia, pushing
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
1862: in front of Yorktown, Va. Union, 3 companies 1st Mass. Confed. No record found. Losses: Union 4 killed, 12 wounded. Confed. 14 captured. April 29, 1862: Bridgeport, Ala. Union, 3d Div. Army of the Ohio. Confed. Leadbetter's Division. Losses: Confed. 72 killed and wounded, 350 captured. April 29, 1862 to June 10, 1862: siege of Corinth, Miss. Union, Gen. Halleck's Army. Confed., Army commanded by Gen. Beauregard. May, 1862. May 1, 1862: Camp Creek, W. Va. Union, Co. C., 23d Ohio. Confed., Detachment 8th Va. Cav. Losses: Union 1 killed, 21 wounded. Confed. 1 killed, 12 wounded. May 4, 1862: evacuation of Yorktown, Va. By Confederate Army under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. May 5, 1862: Lebanon, Tenn. Union, 1st, 4th, and 5th Ky. Cav., Detachment of 7th Pa. Confed., Col. J. H. Morgan's Ky. Cavalry. Losses: Union 6 killed, 25 wounded. Confed. 66 prisoners. May 5, 1862: Lockridge Mills or Dresden, Ky.
ss Lanes, W. Va., August 26, 1861. Action at Carnifex Ferry September 10. Moved to Little Sewell Mountain September 15. Retreat to New River October. Operations in Kanawha Valley and New River Region October 19-November 16. Cotton Mountain November 11-12. At Fayette Court House till April, 1862. Occupation of Raleigh Court House December 28, 1861, to April, 1862 (Cos. A, B, F, G ). Action at mouth of Blue Stone February 8. Advance on Princeton April 23-May 1. Camp Creek May 1 (Co. C ). Princeton May 5. Giles Court House May 7-10. Flat Top Mountain July 4. Pack's Ferry, New River, August 6. Movement to Washington, D. C., August 15-24. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battles of South Mountain September 14. Antietam September 16-17. Moved to Chambersburg October 8. Expedition after Stuart October 13-14. Moved to Clarksburg, Suttonville, Summerville, Gauley Bridge and Kanawha Falls, October 26-November 14. Duty at Falls
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 29: battle of Resaca and the Oostanaula (search)
d causing them heavy losses, and his men, counting out a few stragglers, kept their lines perfectly and behaved like old soldiers. Newton showed here his wonted tenacity. He secured all the ground he could gain by a steady advance, and, stopping from time to time, returned fire for fire, until the fierce artillery and rifle fusillade on both sides diminished to a fitful skirmish. Palmer's corps was doing similar work to my right. Farther toward the left, over the rough ground east of Camp Creek, and amid the underbrush and scattered chestnut trees, I beheld my third division in line. Thomas J. Wood commanded it; covered by a complete skirmish front, every man and officer was in his place. He waited, or he advanced cautiously, so as to support Newton. I came forward and was with him as his men advanced into place. The movement was like a dress parade. I observed Wood's men with interest. How remarkably different the conduct of his veteran soldiers compared with new troops
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
; 171 Camden Court-House, N. C. 138, B12 Camden Point, Mo. 161, B9 Cameron, Mo. 161, A11; 171 Campbell's Station, Tenn. 24, 3; 142, D2, 142, E2; 150, H13 Campbellsville, Tenn. 24, 3; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, B5 Campbellton, Ga. 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 2; 60, 1; 65, 3; 76, 2; 88, 2; 135-A; 148, A12; 149, H12 Camp Creek, Ga. 57, 1, 57, 3; 58, 2; 60, 1, 60, 2; 63, 4; 88, 2; 90, 2; 101, 5, 101, 6, 101, 9, 101, 10, 101, 21; 117, 1; 144, F1; 149, H13 Camp Creek, W. Va. 135-A; 141, F10, 135-A; 141, F11 Campti, La. 50, 6; 52, 1; 53, 1; 155, D1; 158, E13 Cañada Alamosa, N. Mex 98, 1 Canadian River, N. Mex. 98, 1; 119, 1 Fort Canby, N. Mex. 98, 1 Cane Creek, Ala. 149, H9, 149, H10 Cane Hill, Ark. 66, 1; 160, G10 Cane River, La. 155, F1 Caney Bayou, Tex. 65, 10; 157, G6 Caney Fork, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 150, G8, 150, H10 Cannelton, W. Va. 9, 3 Cannon's Bridge, S. C. 120, 2; 139, F1; 143
destroy the government works. This extensive program Hatch soon found impracticable. On reaching Palo Alto a few hours later, he was attacked by Col. C. R. Barteau, with the Second Tennessee battalion and the commands of Col. J. F. Smith, Maj. W. M. Inge and Capt. T. W. Ham, and was so roughly handled that at night he started back toward Okolona. Barteau made a vigorous pursuit, but was unable to come up with Hatch until near Birmingham, when he attacked and drove the Federals across Camp creek after a fight of about two hours. They burned the bridge behind them, and Barteau's ammunition being exhausted he gave up the pursuit. Grierson was given a grateful relief from Confederate attentions by this diversion, and moved on to Louisville, destroying some property at Starkville, and a shoe factory on the road. One company, under Captain Forbes, dashed to Enterprise and demanded its surrender, but the place was held by Generals Buford and Loring. The raiders then passed through L
362. Cameron, R. A., X., 203. Cameron, S.: IV., 52; V., 130; VII., 30, 98, 192; VIII., 84, 345. Cameron Dragoons, Pa. Fifth Cav., IV., 253. Cammock, J., VIII., 281. Camps— Camp Allegheny, W. Va., I., 354. Camp Anderson, VIII., 89. Camp Asylum, Columbia, S. C., VII., 44. Camp Butler, near Springfield, Ill., I., 175; VII., 44, 68. Camp Cameron, Va., VIII., 67. Camp Cass, Va., I., 343; VIII., 101. Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, VII., 44, 68, 105, 108. Camp Creek, W. Va., I., 362. Camp Defiance, Ill., I., 177. Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.: VII., 22, 44, 68, 73, 148, 159; VIII., 62, 298, 304; IX., 157. Camp Fisk, Vicksburg, Miss., I., 108 seq. Camp Ford, Texas: VII., 46, 49, 51; prison at, VII., 72, 96, 136. Camp Grace, Hempstead, Texas: prison at, VII., 46, 72, 96. Camp Griffin, near Washington, D. C.: IX., 138, 155; Sixth Vermont at, IX., 347. Camp Jackson, St. Louis, Mo.: I., 172, 173, 346, 353,367; VII., 30. Camp James, Washington, D. C., I.,
From Georgia--railroad accident — Arrival of the Atlanta exiles. Macon, September 14. --A train leaded with Federal prisoners ran off the track last night at Camp creek, on the Southwestern railroad. Eight cars and the engine were crushed to pieces. A large number of Yankees were killed and wounded, fully as many as were Confederates in their removal from Point Lookout to Elmira, New York, when a similar accident occurred. Many of our officer, are of the opinion that there will be no further advance of the enemy in Georgia this year. It is thought that Sherman proposed the armistice for the purpose of putting Atlanta in a condition to be held by a small force. The first train of exits from Atlanta arrived last night. They were robbed of everything before being sent into our lines. There has been further correspondence between Generals Hood and Sherman on the subject of an exchange of prisoners, but no agreement has yet been arrived at.