hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 16 results in 8 document sections:

Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
Caecina Paetus, in the time of the Emperor Claudius, heroically showed her husband the way to die (Plinius, Letters, iii. 16.) Martial has immortalised the elder Arria in a famous epigram (i. 14):— When Arria to her Paetus gave the sword, Which her own hand from her chaste bosom drew, 'This wound,' she said, 'believe me, gives no pain, But that will pain me which thy hand will do.' used to say, I would rather be killed to-day than banished to-morrow. What then did RufusC. Musonius Rufus, a Tuscan by birth, of equestrian rank, a philosopher and Stoic (Tacit. Hist. iii. 81). say to him? If you choose death as the heavier misfortune, how great is the folly of your choice? But if, as the lighter, who has given you the choice? Will you not study to be content with that which has been given to you? What then did AgrippinusPaconius Agrippinus was condemned in Nero's time. The charge against him was that he inherited his father's hatred of the head of the Roman state (Tacit. Ann. xvi. 28). T
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brock, Sir Isaac, 1769- (search)
rt of the province. He soon led quite a large body of them, and captured Detroit (q. v.). He also personally led the troops in the battle of Queenston, where he was killed, Oct. 13, 1812. The British government caused a fine monument to be erected to his memory in St. Paul's Cathedral. London. bearing the following inscription: Erected at the public expense to the memory of Maj.-Gen. Sir Isaac Brock, who gloriously fell on the 13th of October, Mdcccxii., in resisting an attack on Queenston, Upper Canada. To the four surviving brothers of Brock 12.000 acres of land in Canada were given, and a pension of $1,000 a year each for life. In 1816 the Canadians struck a medal to his memory, and on the Heights of Queenston they raised a beautiful Tuscan column 135 feet in height. In the base of the monument a tomb was formed, in which the general's remains repose. They were taken to this last resting-place from Fort George on Oct. 13, 1824. A small monument marks the place where he fell.
th of center rib and outside flanges; the cylinder and pump ends of the beam are equal in length, each pair of beams weighs 42 tons. The beam vibrates on a main center or shaft c 20 inches diameter, 9 feet 8 inches long, with journals 15 inches diameter, and 19 1/2 inches bearing. The plummer-blocks, for the beam centers of both engines, rest in pedestals bolted to a massive cast-iron entablature, which (extending transversely across the house and into the brick walls) is supported by four Tuscan columns d of cast-iron, standing on and anchored to the beam wall, by means of arched cast-iron bed-plates, built in the masonry. The piston-rods are guided by parallel motions, and the pump connecting-rods by cross-heads and slides; pistonrods e 6 1/4 inches diameter and 16 feet long each; pump connecting-rods f 8 inches diameter and 28 feet long each. The pump-barrels are 36 inches in diameter each, plungers 36 inches diameter, with stroke same as steam-piston, 10 feet. The extreme li
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 1: childhood (search)
at with us at the supper-table; and, when we were all gathered round the hearth that cold autumnal evening, he told us, partly by words, and partly by gestures, the story of his life and misfortunes: amused us with descriptions of the grape-gatherings and festivals of his sunny clime; edified my mother with a recipe for making bread of chestnuts; and in the morning, when after breakfast his dark sullen face lighted up, and his fierce eyes moistened with grateful emotion as in his own silvery Tuscan accent he poured out his thanks, we marvelled at the fears which had so nearly closed our doors against him; and, as he departed, we all felt that he had left with us the blessing of the poor. But what was the boy himself who was nurtured by that fireside? Whittier tells us this also, in his other poem, The Barefoot boy. Blessings on thee, little man Barefoot boy with cheek of tan, With thy turned — up pantaloons, And thy merry whistled tunes; With thy red lip, redder still Kissed by s
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), The tent on the Beach (search)
g breeze That whispered in the garden trees, It might have been the sound of seas That rose and fell; But, with her heart, if not her ear, The old loved voice she seemed to hear: “I wait to meet thee: be of cheer, For all is well!” 1865. The sweet voice into silence went, A silence which was almost pain As through it rolled the long lament, The cadence of the mournful main. Glancing his written pages o'er, The Reader tried his part once more; Leaving the land of hackmatack and pine For Tuscan valleys glad with olive and with vine. The brother of Mercy. Piero Luca, known of all the town As the gray porter by the Pitti wall Where the noon shadows of the gardens fall, Sick and in dolor, waited to lay down His last sad burden, and beside his mat The barefoot monk of La Certosa sat. Unseen, in square and blossoming garden drifted, Soft sunset lights through green Val d'arno sifted; Unheard, below the living shuttles shifted Backward and forth, and wove, in love or strife, In mir
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Tales and Sketches (search)
t with us at the supper-table; and, when we were all gathered around the hearth that cold autumnal evening, he told us, partly by words and partly by gestures, the story of his life and misfortunes, amused us with descriptions of the grape-gatherings and festivals of his sunny clime, edified my mother with a recipe for making bread of chestnuts; and in the morning, when, after breakfast, his dark, sullen face lighted up and his fierce eye moistened with grateful emotion as in his own silvery Tuscan accent he poured out his thanks, we marvelled at the fears which had so nearly closed our door against him; and, as he departed, we all felt that he had left with us the blessing of the poor. It was not often that, as in the above instance, my mother's prudence got the better of her charity. The regular old stragglers regarded her as an unfailing friend; and the sight of her plain cap was to them an assurance of forthcoming creature-comforts. There was indeed a tribe of lazy strollers,
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1863., [Electronic resource], Affairs in Texas-Contemplated Federal Invasion. (search)
Affairs in Texas-Contemplated Federal Invasion. We have been placed in possession of files of Texas papers as late as the 25th ult. Parties who have arrived in Texas from California state that the Federal troops at Tuscan, Arizona, were under marching orders for the Rio Grande. They are to fall in with Gen. Carleton's command somewhere in Texas. The object of this expedition is said to be to cut off the supplies the Confederacy is receiving by the Rio Grande and through Mexico. It numbers about 5,000, including U. S. regulars and New Mexico and California volunteers. It is said they expect a force of 5,000 more men can be raised in Texas and on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. This expedition will probably work its way towards the Gulf, with the aid of the Union men (as they say) in Texas, until the boundary shall be entirely in the Federal hands. They believe the enterprise to be easy of execution. Their troops will probably start from El Paso, and take possession of t
Ferret is announced. He had been Mayor, Collector of the Port, and served in the Legislature and Municipal Council. The river on the 15th, in front of the city, was falling and was nine feet six inches below the high water mark of 1862. On the 8th instant the river was rising at St Louis. The papers, as usual, contain very little news of interest. There had been an arrival with news from Tampico of a late date. All was quiet at that port. The French had whipped the Mexicans at Tuscan, and captured the fort, with four pieces of artillery. They now occupy the town. It is stated that reinforcements were expected at Tampico, among them a body of eight hundred Arabs, which is rather a strange commodity we imagine. As soon as they arrive expeditions are to be made up to act in the interior on the guerilla plan, we suppose. Judge Dent, a brother-in-law of Gen Grant, has for some time past been cultivating a plantation ten miles back of Skipwith's Landing. A guerilla pa