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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
le obstructions in the river around that bend of six or seven miles. Battery near Dutch Gap. this shows the interior of the Battery, as it appeared when the writer visited it, at the close of December, 1864. it was a powerful work, called Fort Brady. The picture shows one of the embrasures, with a 100-pounder Parrott gun. One of the most important of these works was on a hill on the right bank of the James, near the dwelling of Dr. Howlett, and known as the Howlett House Battery. Duounded; and about seven hundred men were lost by death or maiming, chiefly of Stannard's command, which bore the brunt of the assault. Weitzel assumed the direction of the Eighteenth Corps when Ord was disabled; and Battery Harrison was named Fort Burnham, in honor of the slain general. An attempt was made to capture Fort Gilmer, a little further on, but the assailants were repulsed with a loss of about three hundred men. In the mean time Birney had moved out from Deep Bottom to assail the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
ewry, Nansemond and Hampton, two guns each; the Buford one gun; and the steamer torpedo, with three torpedo boats. for the purpose of breaking the obstructions at the lower end of Dutch Gap Canal, and destroying the pontoon bridges below, thereby separating the National troops on both sides of the river, precedent to an attack in overwhelming force on the wing on the north bank of the James. The squadron moved silently, under cover of darkness, but was observed and fired upon when passing Fort Brady. To this attack the vessels responded, and in so doing they dismounted a 100-pounder Parrott in the Fort, and soon afterward passed out of reach of its guns. Then the Fredericksburg broke the obstructions at Dutch Gap, and passed through, but the other two iron-clads, and the Drewry, in attempting to follow, grounded. The Drewry could not be floated, so she was abandoned, and at daybreak a shell from a National battery fired its magazine, and the vessel was blown Rifle batteries in Fo
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
s along the lines for several miles, to the Dutch Interior of a Chapel of the Christian Commission. this was substantially built of logs, with a double row of benches of timber, leaving a broad aisle between. It was lighted with a few candles; and two tables composed its entire furniture. Gap Canal. See page 857. On the way we visited a chapel of the United States Christian Commission; also,. Battery Harrison, captured by the colored troops not long before, See page 358. and Fort Brady. Near the Dutch Gap Canal, just then completed, we dismounted, and took a pathway like a shelf along the steep bank of the James, where the. excavators had made their subterranean huts, See page 858. when we found ourselves in much peril. The battery at Howlett's, which, as we have observed, cast. a shell among the workmen about once an hour, now hurled one at the end of every five minutes, compelling us to seek shelter in the caves. We succeeded in peeping into the canal, and the
No considerable loss was suffered, nor (otherwise than in destroying the railroad) inflicted. The withdrawal of most of our naval force from the James, to participate in the operations against Wilmington, tempted the authorities in Richmond again to try their luck upon the water. Their three ironclads — the Virginia, Fredericksburg, and Richmond — with five wooden steamers, and three torpedo-boats, dropped Jan. 23, 1865. silently down from the city under cover of darkness, passing Fort Brady at midnight, responding to its fire, and dismounting a 100-pounder in its battery; then passing out of its range, and breaking the chain in front of the obstructions placed in the channel by Gen. Butler at the lower end of Dutch gap, so that the Fredericksburg passed through; while the Richmond, Virginia, and Drewry, attempting to follow, grounded: the last-named, being immovable, was abandoned by her crew at day-light, and soon blown up by a shell from one of our batteries; while the Virg
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 16: capture of fortifications around Richmond, Newmarket Heights, Dutch Gap Canal, elections in New York and gold conspiracy. (search)
rs, who I suspect were too proud and courageous to shelter themselves, as they did their men, behind the reversed intrenchments. We lost there the very efficient General Burnham, in memory of whose gallantry Fort Harrison was afterwards named Fort Burnham. We lost many others of our higher field officers, so that before the battle was ended majors were in command of brigades, and captains of regiments. Every man was a hero on that day. Gen. Hiram Burnham. Three times our line was chargetreet and the United States Arsenal. There was a line from some point near each polling-place in the city. At the several polling-places I had an officer in plain clothes, in command of my scouts and detective officers who were around the Fort Brady, battery Commanding James River. polls. On this officer, in case of any disturbance, the police — who were under the command of Superintendent John A. Kennedy, a very loyal, able, and executive officer,--might call for assistance. Any disturb
agut prize suit, 1011. Foote, Senator, reference to, 695, 715, 716; calumnious letter from Smith to, 696-697; letter quoted, 712-713. Ford's Theatre, Lincoln assassinated at, 930. Forty-Seventh Regiment of Virginia Volunteers, 679. Fort Burnham (formerly Fort Harrison), 737. Fort Darling, 747. Fort Donelson, reference to, 872, 873, 874. Fort Fisher, Weitzel reconnoitres, 774; preparations for expedition against, 782; Butler waits for Porter, 785-787; fleet sails in sight of, 7Farragut advises Butler against expedition, 823; reference to, 831-832, 849; Butler's defeat at, an excuse for his removal, 850. Fort Gilmour, Confederates repulse attack upon, 736, 737. Fort Harrison, captured, 733-734; name changed to Fort Burnham, 737; Lee attempts recapture of, 737. Fort Hatteras, expedition against, 281, 285. Fort Henry, reference to, 874. Fort Jackson, 748. Fort Malakoff, Fort Fisher compared with, 812. Fort Wagner, Maj. G. T. Strong, wounded at, 891.
attery of the Fifth Corps, under General G. K. Warren. On the forenoon of this bright June day, Brady, the photographer, drove his light wagon out to the entrenchments. The Confederates lay along t the ruined chimney of a house belonging to a planter named Taylor. Approaching Captain Cooper, Brady politely asked if he could take a picture of the battery, when just about to fire. At the commay just over the hill observes the movement, and, thinking it means business, opens up. Away goes Brady's horse, scattering chemicals and plates. The gun in the foreground is ready to send a shell across the open ground, but Captain Cooper reserves his fire. Brady, seeing his camera is uninjured, recalls his assistant and takes the other photographs, moving his instrument a little to the rear. ttle interchange of compliments in the way of shells or bullets at this point until Photographer Brady's presence and the gathering of men of Battery B at their posts called forth the well-pointed sa
attery of the Fifth Corps, under General G. K. Warren. On the forenoon of this bright June day, Brady, the photographer, drove his light wagon out to the entrenchments. The Confederates lay along t the ruined chimney of a house belonging to a planter named Taylor. Approaching Captain Cooper, Brady politely asked if he could take a picture of the battery, when just about to fire. At the commay just over the hill observes the movement, and, thinking it means business, opens up. Away goes Brady's horse, scattering chemicals and plates. The gun in the foreground is ready to send a shell across the open ground, but Captain Cooper reserves his fire. Brady, seeing his camera is uninjured, recalls his assistant and takes the other photographs, moving his instrument a little to the rear. ttle interchange of compliments in the way of shells or bullets at this point until Photographer Brady's presence and the gathering of men of Battery B at their posts called forth the well-pointed sa
Union, 20 killed, 67 wounded. The opposing lines near Richmond This picture represents the main bomb-proof at Fort Brady. After the capture of Fort Harrison the Union authorities strengthened that position by constructing a line of fortifications southward to the James. Fort Brady was at the southern end, commanding the river. The bomb-proof was built of heavy cross timbers, covered with fifteen feet of solid earth, and its entrances were at such an angle as to be safe from any croseral Peter S. Michie, acting Chief Engineer for the Union armies about Petersburg. He had directed the construction of Fort Brady, and is now, in April, 1865, investigating the Confederate engineering operations. The 27-foot ditch at Fort Gilmer, guard against Federal mines A well-protected magazine, Fort Brady June 9-30, 1864: Brice's cross roads, near Guntown, Miss. Union, 81st, 95th, 108th, 113th, 114th, and 120th Ill., 72d and 95th Ohio, 9th Minn., 93d Ind., 55th and 59th U.
f the great struggle excited the admiration of friend, foe, and neutral, alike. Owing to the importance of Richmond, General Lee found himself always compelled to keep the one object in view — the defense of the capital of his State and Government. For the safety of the city it was necessary that the approaches should be rendered defensible by small bodies of Up the James at last--1865 These Federal gunboats would not be lying so far up the river-above the Dutch Gap Canal, near Fort Brady-unless the breaking of Lee's lines at Petersburg had forced the evacuation of Richmond, and of the batteries which lined the shores of the river-approach to the city. The Confederate batteries are silent now; and the dreaded Confederate fleet has been destroyed by orders of its own commander. The ironclad, Virginia, which never fired a shot, lies in the mud near Chaffin's Bluff opposite Fort Darling, sunk in a last desperate attempt to obstruct the approach of the Federal fleet. Now fol
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