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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
port-holes, the Texans fired into them; and their guns could not be elevated sufficiently to reach the Confederates, they being near at hand and the banks high. So, closing their port-holes and cutting their cables, the ironclads backed rapidly down the stream, followed for several miles by the Texans. From Greenwood the battery was ordered to Yazoo city, where it arrived on the 1st of June. After one more engagement with the Federal vessels on the Yazoo, it proceeded on the 12th to Vernon, Miss., where it was attached to General McNair's brigade of Walker's division. Six days after, it was transferred to General Ector's brigade of the same division. A section of Captain McNally's Arkansas battery, under Lieutenant Moore, was also attached to this brigade; and, as he was the senior officer, he took command of both sections. Walker's division constituted part of the army which General Joseph E. Johnston was assembling for the relief of Vicksburg. On the 1st of July the movem
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
pi; while Bishop Pierce, Dr. A. L. P. Green, and Rev. J. E. Evans went to General Lee's army in Virginia. Rev. Dr. Kavanaugh was sent to the army of General Price, and Rev. Mr. Marvin (now Bishop) was directed by Bishop Pierce to take position as missionary with ally army corps west of the Mississippi. The work of these ministers, with that of other zealous men from sister Churches, gave a great impulse to the revival. In Colonel Colquitt's Forty-sixth Georgia Regiment, camped near Vernon, Mississippi, the work was powerful, and great numbers were converted. Last night, says Rev. T. C. Stanley, there were about eighty presented themselves for prayer, kneeling upon the ground. The Christian heart could not but be touched while witnessing such a scene. We were under the tall spreading oaks of the forest, and the moon bathing all with its gentle beams, typical of the Spirit that was in mercy sent down from above, enveloping us as with a garment of love, cheering the heart of the C
in Mississippi; while Bishop Pierce, Dr. A. L. P. Green, and Rev. J. E. Evans, went to Gen. Lee's army in Virginia. Rev. Dr. Kavanaugh was sent to the army of General Price, and Rev. Mr. Marvin (now Bishop) was directed by Bishop Pierce to take position as missionary with any army corps west of the Mississippi. The work of these ministers, with that of other zealous men from sister Churches, gave a great impulse to the revival. In Colonel Colquitt's 46th Georgia regiment, camped near Vernon, Miss., the work was powerful, and great numbers were converted. Last night, says Rev. T. C. Stanley, there were about eighty presented themselves for prayer, kneeling upon the ground. The Christian heart could not but be touched while witnessing such a scene. We were under the tall spreading oaks of the forest, and the moon bathing all with its gentle beams, typical of the Spirit that was in mercy sent down from above, enveloping us as with a garment of love, cheering the heart of the Chris
as not wholly unselfish. Friends were gathering in force around Pemberton—the more need he should meet them with his friends. If he granted Banks a favor, he had equally a favor to ask of Banks. Can you aid me, and send me troops after the reduction of Port Hudson to assist me at Vicksburg? Grant did not seem at this time to have conjectured that Vicksburg was to surrender to him before, not after Port Hudson was to surrender to Banks. Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, writing from Camp near Vernon, Miss., on May 19, 1863, informed Gardner at Port Hudson that Lieutenant-General Pemberton had been unfortunate. Suffering severely near Edwards depot on the 16th of May; on the 17th, abandoning Haynes' Bluff, he was compelled to fall back to Vicksburg. It is not as a historian, jealous for truth, that Johnston thus addresses Gardner. While displaying certain attributes rather suggestive of Bildad the Shumite, he is frankly peremptory with the commander at Port Hudson. Under the circumstanc