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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 30 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 (search)
raw, looked for her in the early morning she had disappeared from sight. He had expected to return to the Vulture after the conference was over; now he was compelled to cross the river at King's Ferry and return to New York by land. Fac-simile of Arnold's disguised handwriting. Fac-simile of a portion of one of Andre‘s letters. He left his uniform, and, disguised in citizen's dress, he crossed the river towards evening with a single attendant, passed through the American works at Verplanck's Point without suspicion, spent the night not far from the Croton River, and the next morning journeyed over the Neutral Ground on horseback, with a full expectation of entering New York before night. Arnold had furnished him with papers revealing the condition of the highland stronghold. At Tarrytown, 27 miles from the city, he was stopped (Sept. 23) and searched by three young militiamen, who, finding those papers concealed under the feet of Andre in his boot, took him to the nearest Amer
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
of)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repulsed)June 28, 1776 Fort Stony Point, on the Hudson (captured by British fleet)May 31, 1779 Verplanck's Point, on the Hudson (captured by British fleet)June 1, 1779 British fleet and American flotilla of thirty-seven vessels on Penobscot River (latter destroyed)Aug. 13, 1779 Bon Homme Richard and the Alliance against the Serapis (off coast of Engof)Sept. and Oct. 1781 naval engagements. Hampton, Va. (British fleet repulsed)Oct. 24, 1775 Fort Sullivan, Charleston Harbor (British fleet repulsed)June 28, 1776 Fort Stony Point, on the Hudson (captured by British fleet)May 31, 1779 Verplanck's Point, on the Hudson (captured by British fleet)June 1, 1779 British fleet and American flotilla of thirty-seven vessels on Penobscot River (latter destroyed)Aug. 13, 1779 Bon Homme Richard and the Alliance against the Serapis (off coast of En
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, Fort, capture of (search)
the passage of hostile vessels up that stream. Forts Clinton and Montgomery were under the immediate command of Gov. George Clinton, and his brother Gen. James Clinton. Tories had informed Sir Henry Clinton of the weakness of the garrisons, and as soon as expected reinforcements from Europe had arrived, he prepared transports to ascend the river. He sailed (Oct. 4, 1777) with more than 3,000 troops, in many armed and unarmed vessels, commanded by Commodore Hotham, and landed them at Verplanck's Point, a few miles below Peekskill, then the headquarters of General Putnam, commander of the Highland posts. He deceived Putnam by a feigned attack on Peekskill, but the more sagacious Governor Clinton believed he designed to attack the Highland forts. Under cover of a dense fog, on the morning of the 6th, Sir Henry re-embarked 2,000 troops, crossed the river, and landed them on Stony Point, making a circuitous march around the Dunderberg to fall upon the Highland forts. At the same time
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French assistance. (search)
ublicanism, and feared the revolution as menacing thrones; and the chief motive in favoring the Americans, especially of France, was to injure England, humble her pride, and weaken her power. The headquarters of the American army were at Verplanck's Point at the beginning of autumn, 1782, where (about 10,000 strong) it was joined by the French army on its return from Virginia, in September. The latter encamped on the left of the Americans, at Crompond, about 10 miles from Verplanck's Point.Verplanck's Point. They had received orders to proceed to Boston and there embark for the West Indies. They left their encampment near Peekskill Oct. 22, and marched by way of Hartford and Providence. Rochambeau there left the army in charge of Baron de Viomenil and returned to Washington's headquarters on his way to Philadelphia. The French troops reached Boston the first week in December. On the 24th they sailed from Boston, having been in the United States two and a half years. Rochambeau sailed from Ann
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King's Ferry, the (search)
King's Ferry, the Between Stony Point and Verplanck's Point, on the Hudson River, just below the lower entrance to the Highlands, was an important crossing-place, known as the King's Ferry. It was by this ferry that the great route from the Eastern to the Middle States crossed the Hudson. It was defended by two forts— Stony Point on the west side, and Fort Lafayette, at Verplanck's Point, on the east. Sir Henry Clinton resolved to seize this ferry and its defences. On Old sign. the return of the expedition of Matthews and Collier from Virginia, Sir Henry ascended the Hudson with the same squadron and 6,000 soldiers. He landed his troops on both ss. The works on Stony Point were View at King's Mountain battle-ground. unfinished, and, on the approach of the British, were abandoned. Cannon were placed on its outer works, and brought to bear on the fort at Verplanck's Point, which, invested on the land side, was compelled to surrender, June 1, after a spirited resistanc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steamboats, Hudson River (search)
k. the Paragon, will leave Albany every Thursday morning at nine o'clock. the Car of Neptune, do., every Saturday morning at nine o'clock the North River, do., every Tuesday morning at nine o'clock. prices of passage. From New York to Verplanck's Point, $2; West Point, $2.50 Newburgh, $3 ; Wappinger's Creek, $3.25; Poughkeepsie, $3.50; Hyde Park, $4; Esopus, $4.25; Red Hook, $4.50; Catskill, $5; Hudson, $5; Coxsackie, $5.50; Kinderhook, $5.75; Albany, $7. From Albany to Kinderhook, $1.50; Coxsackie, $2; Hudson, $2: Catskill, $2.25; Red Hook, $2.75; Esopus, $3; Hyde Park, $3.25; Poughkeepsie, $3.50; Wappinger's Creek, $4; Newburgh, $4.25; West Point, $4.75; Verplanck's Point, $5.25; New York, $7. All other way passengers to pay at the rate of $1 for every twenty miles. No one can be taken on board and put on shore, however short the distance, for less than $1. Young persons from two to ten years of age to pay half price. Children under two years, one-fourth price. Ser
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stony Point, capture of (search)
y a regiment of foot, some grenadiers, and artillery, the whole commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson. Gen. Anthony Wayne undertook to take the fort by storm; and at the same time a force under Gen. Robert Howe was to attack the fort at Verplanck's Point. Several small British vessels of war were anchored in the river, within cannon-range of the forts. The latter had been enlarged and strengthened. Upon a complete surprise of the garrison depended the success of the undertaking. With th79, 2 A. M. Dear General,—The fort and garrison, with Colonel Johnson, are ours. Our officers and men behaved like men determined to be free. At dawn the next day the guns of the Major Stewart's medal. fort were turned upon the works at Verplanck's Point, on the opposite side of the river, but Howe did not make the attack in time to dislodge the garrison. Lacking a force to man the fort properly, the ordnance and stores were conveyed to West Point, the works were destroyed, and the place e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vaughan, Sir John 1738- (search)
Vaughan, Sir John 1738- Military officer; born in England in 1738; came to America as colonel of the 40th Regiment, and served on the staff of Sir Henry Clinton as brigadier-general and major-general. In January, 1777, he was made majorgeneral in the British army. In the battle of Long Island he led the grenadiers, and was wounded at the landing on New York Island afterwards. He participated in the capture of forts Clinton and Montgomery, in the Hudson Highlands, and, proceeding up the river in a squadron of light vessels, he burned Kingston and devastated other places on the shores. In May, 1779, he captured Stony and Verplanck's points on the Hudson, and returned to England in the fall, becoming commander-in-chief of the Leeward Islands. With Rodney, he took Eustatia in 1781. He was a representative of Berwick, in Parliament, from 1774 until his death in Martinique, June 30, 1795.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webster, James (search)
Webster, James British military officer; born about 1743; entered the army, and became major of the 33d Foot in 1771; fought with distinction in the Revolutionary War; and became lieutenantcolonel. He took part in the operations in New Jersey in 1777, at Verplanck's Point in 1778, in Cornwallis's campaign in the South, and in the battle of Guilford, N. C., in 1781. In the latter engagement he was so severely wounded that he died soon afterwards.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry. (search)
t, Congress voted, April 7, 1779, that he have a commission as captain in the army, to rank as such from July 1, 1776. Journals of Congress, Vol. V. p. 140. Captain Sumner was placed at the head of a company of light infantry. He was attached to the division of the army, whose Headquarters were at or near West Point. His company was frequently, for weeks and months together, some miles in advance of the division, either up or down the North River, in some exposed position, at Verplanck's Point, Fishkill, or Peekskill. His command involved constant activity. While serving under General Heath, he was impressed with the characteristic difference between that officer and General Arnold, under whom he had served on the northern frontier in 1776. He said to General Heath, one day, that he hoped at some time to see more of the hazards of war, and to meet them on a larger theatre. The general, who was a prudent rather than an adventurous officer, replied: I am placed here to r
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