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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 1 1 Browse Search
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e squadron. From information which we had gained, we learned that the enemy had, about two miles above us, heavy obstructions across the river, consisting of spiles and sunken vessels, defended by a very strong battery on a high bluff, called Ward's Hill. This Ward's Hill was but eight miles below Richmond, and at a council of war held on board the flag-ship, (the Galena,) consisting of the commanders of the five vessels, it was arranged that the squadron should the next morning attack the Ward's Hill was but eight miles below Richmond, and at a council of war held on board the flag-ship, (the Galena,) consisting of the commanders of the five vessels, it was arranged that the squadron should the next morning attack the battery in the order arranged. If successful in shelling them out, the Stevens was to haul out the spies, while men from the squadron spiked the guns. I was provided with a chain for the purpose, and intended pumping out aft and submerging forward until making fast, and heaving taut — then pump out forward, and submerge aft to loosen the spile in its hold, and then haul upon it until drawn, etc., etc. We likewise learned that the enemy had rifle-pits well manned; and even while at anchor o
d in rifle range of the rebel ditches. Our work had to be done with silence to keep the rebels from firing on us. Twenty-seventh, part of Colonel Wolford's command remained in this ditch, while the rest made Headquarters on what is now called Ward's Hill. This is the hill our regiment took position on, on the evening of the fifteenth--hence the name, Ward's Hill. Our regiment was the first troop that ever ascended it. Twenty-eighth, we still remained in the pit. Now three companies of our reWard's Hill. Our regiment was the first troop that ever ascended it. Twenty-eighth, we still remained in the pit. Now three companies of our regiment — B, H, and G--Captain Ragsdale commanding. Captain Scott, Forty-fifth Ohio, commanding skirmish-line. November twenty-ninth, long before day the rebels made a desperate charge on the north side of the river, got into the rifle-pits, and even into Fort Sanders, but were driven back with great slaughter by the Ninth army corps. Heavy firing was kept up from that till daylight. At daylight the enemy made a simultaneous charge on both sides of the river. They charged upon the pit we
tion of 2d and 3d Army Corps. N. Y. Nation, vol. 38, p. 274. — Number and name of troops against Gen. Sedgwick; Marye's Heights, Chancellorsville. N. Y. Nation, vol. 39, p. 109. — Situation of the army of Potomac during the Peninsular engagements and after Fredericksburg described, in reply to Lord Wolseley's criticisms. N. Y. Nation, vol. 44, pp. 269, 362, 363. Walker, Katherine C. Three trophies from the war; New Berne contraband story. Harper's Mon., vol. 29, p. 60. Ward's Hill, Va. Expedition up the James river, May 15, 1862; naval. Boston Evening Journal, May 20, 1862, p. 4, cols. 4, 5; May 21, p. 4, col. 6. Wardrop, col. David W., 3d Regt. M. V. M. In paper on Theo. Winthrop. Geo. Wm. Curtis. Atlantic, vol. 8, p. 242. War memoirs. Gen. G. A. Custer. Galaxy, vols. 21, pp. 319, 448, 624, 809; 22, pp. 293, 447, 684. Warren, Gen. Gouverneur Kemble, U. S. A. See also Five Forks. — Resolutions of 12th Regt. M. V. I. upon his death and his<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last battle of the late war. [from the times-democrat, September 8, 1895.] (search)
t contained one gun, denominated a siege gun, 32-pounder, and two 12-pounders. The large gun occupied the eastern corner of the fort, while the two smaller ones commanded the southern and western approaches. The small arms consisted of 113 smooth-bore muskets. At 10 o'clock the enemy came in sight, and Trapanier, a young South Carolinian, aimed the siege guns on their columns, and brought down Colonel La Grange's horse and two pack-horses. The Federals planted their brass cannon on Ward's Hill, just a half mile from the fort, a most commanding position, and began a rapid and effective cannonade on the fort. They soon drove in the outposts, and began to sound the bugle for charges on the coveted trophy. The valiant soldiery in the fort, though but a handful, were equal to the occasion, and repulsed attack after attack. The cannon in the fort was silenced about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, every gunner having been either killed or wounded. General Tyler, while recklessly expos