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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 0 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Ancestry-birth-boyhood (search)
neration my great grandfather, Noah Grant, and his younger brother, Solomon, held commissions in the English army, in 1756, in the war against the French and Indians. Both were killed that year. My grandfather, also named Noah, was then but nine years old. At the breaking out of the war of the Revolution, after the battles of Concord and Lexington, he went with a Connecticut company to join the Continental army, and was present at the battle of Bunker Hill. He served until the fall of Yorktown, or through the entire Revolutionary war. He must, however, have been on furlough part of the time — as I believe most of the soldiers of that period were — for he married in Connecticut during the war, had two children, and was a widower at the close. Soon after this he emigrated to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, and settled near the town of Greensburg in that county. He took with him the younger of his two children, Peter Grant. The elder, Solomon, remained with his relatives in C
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
District of Washington, 22nd Army Corps, Dept. of Washington, to April, 1863. Reserve Brigade, 3rd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Virginia, to June, 1863. Wardrop's Independent Brigade, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1863. U. S. Forces, Yorktown, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to October, 1863. Heckman's Command, Newport News, Va., to January, 1864. 1st Brigade, U. S. Forces, Yorktown, Va., Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to February, 1864. Unattached, Yorktown, Pa., Dept. Virginia and North Carolina, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 18th Army Corps, Army of the James, to December, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 24th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Service. Guard and provost duty at Washington, D. C., till April, 1863. Ordered to Suffolk, Va., April 16. Siege of Suffolk April 20-May 4. Moved to Portsmouth, Va., May 13. Operations on Norfolk & Petersburg Railroad May 15-28. Antioch Church and Barber's Cross Roads May
e spring of 186; he was appointed, May 14, colonel of the Twelfth United States Infantry, and three days later was commissioned brigadier general, United States volunteers. Gen. Franklin commanded a brigade in Heintzelman's division at Bull Run. During the period of organization of the Army of the Potomac, and until its movement in the spring of 1862, he commanded a division which was first assigned to McDowell's corps. The division was detached in April, 1862, and joined McClellan before Yorktown. Gen. Franklin commanded at West Point near the mouth of the Pamunkey, May 6, 1862, and during this month organized the Sixth Army Corps, which he commanded till the following November. During this period he commanded in the affairs at Golding's Farm and White Oak Swamp, June 27 to 30; commanded the left at South Mountain, September 14, his troops capturing Crampton's Gap; relieved Sumner's command in the afternoon of September 17, at Antietam. In November he assumed command of the lef