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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. 3 1 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 3 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for Kensington (United Kingdom) or search for Kensington (United Kingdom) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
in 1846, before he was overwhelmed by letters and notes of invitation, and proffered courtesies from friends in London and in other parts of the kingdom. After George Thompson, his first call was on John Bright, whom he happened never to have met in his previous visits. Their interview was delightful for its cordiality and June 19. informality, seeming rather like the meeting of old friends. The next day he paid his respects to the Duke and Duchess June 20. of Argyll, at Argyll Lodge, Kensington, desiring to testify his appreciation of the Duke's unfaltering support of the Northern cause during the civil war, and his grateful remembrance of the friendship and support of the Duchess of Sutherland, whose daughter, a young girl in 1840, now greeted him as the Duchess of Argyll. Five of her twelve children were brought into the room to see him whose name had ever been an honored one in her mother's house. A day or two later he received a note from the (Dowager) Duchess of Sutherland
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
riefly at the annual meeting of the National Woman June 21. Suffrage Association; and at a meeting in behalf of the London School of Medicine for Women he listened to June 25. speeches by the Earl of Shaftesbury, Mr. Stansfeld, Mrs. James Stansfeld, Henry Fawcett. Westlake, Prof. Fawcett, Miss Jex Blake, and Dr. Garrett-Anderson. He also heard a liberal discourse by Dean Sophia Jex Blake. Stanley at St. Stephen's. One of his pleasantest mornings June 24. was spent at Argyll Lodge, in Kensington, where he breakfasted with the Duke and Duchess of Argyll and their June 23. daughters,—John Bright, Hon. Charles Howard, and Hon. Lyulph Stanley being the other guests; and he had a cheerful interview also with Lord Houghton, who was just then June 28. confined to his room by a painful accident, but who insisted on seeing him, though other callers were turned away. The British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society would not consent to Mr. Garrison's leaving London without receiving some m