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Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 2 0 Browse Search
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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 34 (search)
Methana, then, is a peninsula of the Peloponnesus. Within it, bordering on the land of Troezen, is Hermione. The founder of the old city, the Hermionians say, was Hermion, the son of Europs. Now Europs, whose father was certainly Phoroneus, Herophanes of Troezen said was an illegitimate child. For surely the kingdom of Argos would not likely to stand a fair chance against Niobe's child, whose father was supposed to be Zeus. Subsequently the Dorians from Argos settled, among other places, at Hermion, but I do not think there was war between the two peoples, or it would have been spoken of by the Argives. There is a road from Troezen to Hermion by way of the rHermion by way of the rock which aforetime was called the altar of Zeus Sthenius (Strong) but afterwards TheseusSee Paus. 1.27.8, and Paus. 2.32.7. took up the tokens, and people now call it the Rock of Theseus. As you go, then, along a mountain road by way of this rock, you reach a temple of Apollo surnamed Platanistius (God of the Plane-tree Grove), a
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 35 (search)
ron. This sanctuary is said by the Hermionians to have been founded by Clymenus, son of Phoroneus, and Chthonia, sister of Clymenus. But the Argive account is that when Demeter came to Argolis, while Atheras and Mysius afforded hospitality to the goddess, Colontas neither received her into his home nor paid her any other mark of respect. His daughter Chthoia disapproved of this conduct. They say that Colontas was punished by being burnt up along with his house, while Chthonia was brought to Hermion by Demeter, and made the sanctuary for the Hermionians. At any rate, the goddess herself is called Chthonia, and Chthonia is the name of the festival they hold in the summer of every year. The manner of it is this. The procession is headed by the priests of the gods and by all those who hold the annual magistracies; these are followed by both men and women. It is now a custom that some who are still children should honor the goddess in the procession. These are dressed in white, and wear wr
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Messenia, chapter 34 (search)
wn of Colonides lies on high ground, a short distance from the sea. The people of Asine originally adjoined the Lycoritae on Parnassus. Their name, which they maintained after their arrival in Peloponnese, was Dryopes, from their founder. Two generations after Dryops, in the reign of Phylas, the Dryopes were conquered in battle by Heracles and brought as an offering to Apollo at Delphi. When brought to Peloponnese according to the god's instructions to Heracles, they first occupied Asine by Hermion. They were driven thence by the Argives and lived in Messenia. This was the gift of the Lacedaemonians, and when in the course of time the Messenians were restored, they were not driven from their city by the Messenians. But the people of Asine give this account of themselves. They admit that they were conquered by Heracles and their city in Parnassus captured, but they deny that they were made prisoners and brought to Apollo. But when the walls were carried by Heracles, they deserted the t
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 23 (search)
turned towards the rising sun, and was dedicated by those Greeks who at Plataea fought against the Persians under Mardonius.479 B.C. On the right of the pedestal are inscribed the cities which took part in the engagement: first the Lacedaemonians, after them the Athenians, third the Corinthians, fourth the Sicyonians, fifth the Aeginetans; after the Aeginetans, the Megarians and Epidaurians, of the Arcadians the people of Tegea and Orchomenus, after them the dwellers in Phlius, Troezen and Hermion, the Tirynthians from the Argolid, the Plataeans alone of the Boeotians, the Argives of Mycenae, the islanders of Ceos and Melos, Ambraciots of the Thesprotian mainland, the Tenians and the Lepreans, who were the only people from Triphylia, but from the Aegean and the Cyclades there came not only the Tenians but also the Naxians and Cythnians, Styrians too from Euboea, after them Eleans, Potidaeans, Anactorians, and lastly the Chalcidians on the Euripus. Of these cities the following are at
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 9 (search)
Cephisocles, Hermophantus and Hicesius of Chios; Timarchus and Diagoras of Rhodes; Theodamus of Cnidus; Cimmerius of Ephesus and Aeantides of Miletus. These were made by Tisander, but the next were made by Alypus of Sicyon, namely:—Theopompus the Myndian, Cleomedes of Samos, the two Euboeans Aristocles of Carystus and Autonomus of Eretria, Aristophantus of Corinth, Apollodorus of Troezen, and Dion from Epidaurus in Argolis. Next to these come the Achaean Axionicus from Pellene, Theares of Hermion, Pyrrhias the Phocian, Comon of Megara, Agasimenes of Sicyon, Telycrates the Leucadian, Pythodotus of Corinth and Euantidas the Ambraciot; last come the Lacedaemonians Epicydidas and Eteonicus. These, they say, are works of Patrocles and Canachus. The Athenians refuse to confess that their defeat at Aegospotami was fairly inflicted, maintaining that they were betrayed by Tydeus and Adeimantus, their generals, who had been bribed, they say, with money by Lysander. As a proof of this assert
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz), Book 1, Addressed to Bassus, possibly the poet of iambics mentioned by Ovid (search)
Addressed to Bassus, possibly the poet of iambics mentioned by Ovid ANTIOPEdaughter of Nycteus and wife of Lycus, who imprisoned her and married Dirce. Antiope's sons by Jupiter—Amphion and Zethus—kill Dirce. HERMIONEdaughter of Menelaus and Helen; courted by Neoptolemus and Orestes. Why, Bassus, are you praising all these girls, tempting me to change and leave my mistress? Why don't you let me serve my usual bondage for whatever is left to me of life? Go ahead and swoon over Antiope's beauty, praise Spartan Hermione and all the other beauties generations have borne. Cynthia won't allow their names to be spoken. And if you compare her to anything less, she is superior, even to the most demanding arbiter. But this “beauty” is the least cause of my passion. There are stronger attractions, Bassus, for which it is a joy to perish: a natural color and skill in many arts, the pleasures she carries under a normal dress. And the more you struggle to dissolve our love, the more our ha