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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 452 6 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 260 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 174 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 117 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 107 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 89 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 85 83 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 77 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 72 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fort Fisher (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
mposed of Gregg's and Duffie's cavalry, and a small brigade of infantry, perhaps fifteen hundred men, commanded by the gallant General David Russell, who was subsequently killed in the battle of the Opequan, in the Shenandoah Valley. The force to cross at Beverly ford was accompanied by General Pleasonton in person, and was composed of Buford's cavalry and a small brigade of infantry, commanded by General Adelbert Ames, afterward greatly distinguished in leading the successful assault on Fort Fisher, and notorious later on as the carpet-bag Governor of Mississippi. To effect the contemplated junction near Brandy Station, the Beverly ford column would bear to the left, the Kelly's ford column to the right — the Orange and Alexandria Railroad lying between them as they marched. As an aide-de-camp to General Pleasonton, it was my fortune to be thrown with the Beverly ford column, and all that I saw of what occurred after the crossing of the river, on the morning of the 9th, was connec
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First attack on Fort Fisher (search)
two heavy columbiads were mounted. Between Fort Fisher and this lofty battery was a line of intrenw Inlet. About seven miles southwest from Fort Fisher, at Smithville, on the right of the old entrles K. Graham had made a reconnoissance of Fort Fisher by means of the blockading squadron. Rumornsidered it important to strike the blow at Fort Fisher in the absence of that general. Grant had effected while the Confederates still held Fort Fisher and the batteries guarding the entrance to is opinion by diagrams, showing the form of Fort Fisher and the other defenses, and concluded that g sun behind it, hung in the still air over Fort Fisher. Porter had, indeed, caused the Louisiana,t Newbern and Beaufort, but the garrison of Fort Fisher thought it was the effect of the bursting o two brigades were then within two miles of Fort Fisher, and that others were pressing on. The weatguns of the navy ceased work, when those of Fort Fisher sent a storm of grape and canister-shot aft[25 more...]