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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
nding country, upon a line of about ten miles. Al the railroads entering the city I connected at one depot, more cars were added, and on twenty-four hours notice 10,000 men could have been move upon them from any one point to the opposite side of the State. The officer who had been left within the Confederate lines had returned, bringing important information. concerning the position of the enemy, together with the rough maps required, indicating, among other points, the positions of Forts Henry and Donelson, then in course of construction. I sent him back immediately to make examinations of the Tennessee and Cumberland with reference to the use of those rivers by gun-boats, and also to watch the enemy's moves toward the Cairo district. In answer to my appeal to the loyal governors for troops, regiment after regiment arrived at St. Louis from the whole North-west, but they were entirely without tents or camp equipage. The chief quartermaster of my department was an officer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Recollections of Foote and the gun-boats. (search)
ich flows from success in such a work, he has the satisfaction of reflecting that it was with vessels at the time his own property that the brilliant capture of Fort Henry was accomplished, and the conquest of Donelson and Island Number10 achieved. The ever-memorable midnight passage of Number Ten by the Pittsburgh and CarondeletMr. Welles expressed the wish that I should confer with Admiral Foote about them before proceeding to build them, inasmuch as the experience which he had had at Forts Henry and Donelson and elsewhere would be of great value, and might enable him to suggest improvements in them. I therefore hastened from Washington to Island Numberher of the Admiral. Among other interesting matters, he related an anecdote of one of his little daughters who was just learning to read. After the capture of Fort Henry the squadron was brought back to Cairo for repairs, and, on the Sunday following, the crews, with their gallant flag-officer, attended one of the churches in Ca
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes on the life of Admiral Foote. (search)
that without my flotilla everything on your rivers, your cities and towns would be at the mercy of the enemy? My first duty then is to care for my boats, if I am to protect you. Now when I ran up the Tennessee and the Cumberland, and attacked Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, if my boats were rendered unmanageable as my flag-ship was at Donelson, the current took care of me by carrying me away from the enemy's works. But all this is changed when I descend the Mississippi. Then my boats, if they ake Charleston. But, instead of his being affected by the solemn intelligence, Foote replied that he felt he was prepared and that he was glad to be through with guns and war. He died at the Astor House, in the city of New York, on the 26th of the same month. The mother of General Tilghman, who surrendered Fort Henry, was at the hotel, and, learning of his illness, tendered her sympathies. His native city of New Haven gave a public funeral, which was attended by the governor and legislature.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The gun-boats at Belmont and Fort Henry. (search)
The gun-boats at Belmont and Fort Henry. Henry Walke, Rear-Admiral, U. S. N. Army transportsoote in the wheel-house of the Cincinnati at Fort Henry. At the beginning of the war, the army ate and Generals Grant and McClernand against Fort Henry, situated on the eastern bank of the TennessComposition and losses of the Union fleet at Fort Henry: Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, commanding. Firs up to Panther Island, about two miles below Fort Henry. At 11:35, having passed the foot of the isn hour's hard fighting, the captain Map of Fort Henry, February 6, 1862. of the Essex, going belohe gallant manner in which they had captured Fort Henry. He had expected his troops to take part inteamer Eastport. The news of the capture of Fort Henry was received with great rejoicing all over the North. Following upon the capture of Fort Henry (February 6th, 1862) and of Fort Donelson (F Polk to visit him at Jackson. The fall of Forts Henry and Donelson, and the declared purpose of t[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The defense of Fort Henry. (search)
The defense of Fort Henry. Captain Jesse Taylor, C. S. A. About the 1st of September, 1861, while I was in command of a Confederate camp of artillery instruction, near Nashville, Tenn., I received a visit The attack upon Fort Henry. After a Fort Henry. After a drawing by rear-admiral Walke. from Lieutenant-Colonel Milton A. Haynes of the 1st Regiment Tennessee Artillery, who informed me of the escape of a number of our steamers from the Ohio River-into the Tennessee, and of their having sought refuge under the guns of Fort Henry; that a cutting-out expedition from Paducah was anticipated, and that as there was no experienced artillerist at the fort the governor (Isham G. Harris) was anxious that the deficiency should immediately be supplied; that he h disposal unless I would give up my light battery (subsequently Porter's and later still Morton's), and take command at Fort Henry. Anxious to be of service, and convinced that the first effort of the Federals would be to penetrate our lines by the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
the 32d Indiana, deployed as skirmishers, and Terry's Texas Cavalry-notable as one of the few fights of the war between infantry skirmishers in the open and cavalry. Nothing else of moment occurred on Buell's main line until the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson compelled Johnston to retire from Bowling Green and leave the road to Nashville open. The letter which follows shows Mr. Lincoln's ideas of what was demanded by the situation: Executive Mansion, Washington, January 13th, 1862.road. Yours, very truly, A. Lincoln. [Indorsement]: January 13th, 1862. Having to-day written General Buell a letter, it occurs to me to send General Halleck a copy of it. A. Lincoln. On February 5th, the day before the capture of Fort Henry, General Buell wrote thus to General Halleck in a correspondence with regard to cooperation: I think it is quite plain that the center of the enemy's line — that part which you are now moving against — is the decisive point of his whole front,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
re were woods apparently interminable. From Fort Henry, twelve miles north-west, a road entered the haste, requesting the General's presence at Fort Henry. There was quick mounting at headquarters, here was continuous and heavy cannonading at Fort Henry, and greater excitement at Fort Donelson. Tivision which in the land operations against Fort Henry had marched up the left bank of the River ag the land. After receiving the surrender of Fort Henry, flag-officer Foote had hastened to Cairo toattery a, Illinois, had been left behind at Forts Henry and Heiman under myself. A courier was disf the 13th might have thrown Grant back upon Fort Henry. Such an achievement would have more than o thousands of those outside had marched from Fort Henry as to a summer fete, leaving coats, blanketsertainty as this: that when General Grant at Fort Henry became fixed in the resolution to undertake whole army defeated and fleeing in rout for Fort Henry and the transports on the river, he deported[6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
; w, 28; Louisville, Commander Benjamin M. Dove, k, 4; w, 5; Pittsburgh, Lieut. Egbert Thompson, w, 2; Tyler, Lieut.-Com. William Gwin; Conestoga, Lieut.-Com. S. L. Phelps. Total loss: k, 11; w, 43 =54. The vessels which had been in action at Fort Henry (see page 362) carried the same armament at Fort Donelson. The Louisville and Pittsburgh were each armed with 6 32-pounders, 3 8-inch, and 4 rifled 42-pounders. The Louisville had also 1 12-pounder boat-howitzer. The total loss of the Union ptured, General Grant says in his Memoirs : I asked General Buckner about what force lie had to surrender. He replied that he could not tell with any degree of accuracy; that all the sick and weak had been sent to Nashville while we were about Fort Henry; that Floyd and Pillow had left during the night, taking many men with them; and that Forrest, and probably others, had also escaped during the preceding night; the number of casualties he could not tell; but he said I would not find fewer than
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
The Carondelet fighting Fort Donelson, February 13, 1862. from a sketch by rear-admiral Walke. On the 7th of February, the day after the capture of Fort Henry, I received on board the Carondelet Colonels Webster, Rawlins, and McPherson, with a company of troops, and under instructions from General Grant proceeded up tthat time, as we learned afterward from a credible source, the evacuation of the fort (which General Grant's successes at The mortar-boats at Island number10. Forts Henry and Donelson had made necessary) was going on, and the last raft and barge loads of all the movable munitions of war were descending the river, which, with a lawhistle so as to announce our approach to the enemy who had now retired to Island Number10, a strong position sixty miles below Columbus (and of the latitude of Forts Henry and Donelson), where General Beauregard, who was now in general command of our opponents, had determined to contest the possession of the river. On March 15
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis. (search)
to plant the National flag and to examine the abandoned fortifications, the gunboats at this point taking the advance. The advance of Halleck upon Corinth after Shiloh, and its evacuation on May 30th, gave the Union forces possession of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, broke the second line of Confederate defense, and turned all the positions on the river above Memphis. Fort Pillow and Fort Randolph were thus made untenable (just as Columbus had become untenable after the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson on the Confederate first line of defense) and hence were evacuated.-editors. After leaving Fort Randolph the ram-fleet proceeded without incident to within about twenty-five miles of Memphis, where they all rounded to and tied up for the night, with orders of sailing issued to each commander; instructions to be ready to round out at the signal from the flag-ship, and that each boat should go into the anticipated fight in the same order they maintained in sailing. At the
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