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e terms were ungenerous and unchivalric, but that necessity compelled him to accept then; and Grant telegraphed Halleck on February 16: We have taken Fort Donelson, and from twelve to fifteen thousand prisoners. The senior Confederate generals, Pillow and Floyd, and a portion of the garrison had escaped by the Cumberland River during the preceding night. Since the fall of Fort Henry on February 6, a lively correspondence had been going on, in which General Halleck besought Buell to come wificer Foote. Full particulars of these two important victories did not reach Halleck for several days. Following previous suggestions, Pope and Foote promptly moved their gunboats and troops down the river to the next Confederate stronghold, Fort Pillow, where extensive fortifications, aided by an overflow of the adjacent river banks, indicated strong resistance and considerable delay. When all the conditions became more fully known, Halleck at length adopted the resolution, to which he had
n of the high bluffs on which it stands, was the most defensible point on the whole length of the great river within the Southern States; but so confidently had the Confederates trusted to the strength of their works at Columbus, Island No.10, Fort Pillow, and other points, that the fortifications of Vicksburg had thus far received comparatively little attention. The recent Union victories, however, both to the north and south, had awakened them to their danger; and when Lovell evacuated New Oo send a cooperating force to Farragut's assistance, or, at the very least, to have matured plans for such cooperation. All the events would have favored an expedition of this kind. When Corinth, at the end of May, fell into Halleck's hands, Forts Pillow and Randolph on the Mississippi River were hastily evacuated by the enemy, and on June 6 the Union flotilla of river gunboats which had rendered such signal service at Henry, Donelson, and Island No.10, reinforced by a hastily constructed flot
Chapter 25. Negro soldiers Fort Pillow retaliation draft Northern Democrats-Governor Seymour's attitude- draft Riots in New York Vallandigham Lincoln on his authority to suspend writ of Habeas corpus Knights of the Golden Circle Jacob Thompson in Canada On the subject of negro soldiers, as on many other topics, the period of active rebellion and civil war had wrought a profound change in public opinion. From the foundation of the government to the Rebellion, the either excesses by the colored troops or even a single instance of such proclaimed barbarity upon white Union officers; and the visitation of vengeance upon negro soldiers is confined, so far as known, to the single instance of the massacre at Fort Pillow. In that deplorable affair, the Confederate commander reported, by telegraph, that in thirty minutes he stormed a fort manned by seven hundred, and captured the entire garrison, killing five hundred and taking one hundred prisoners, while he
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 11: Kentucky. (search)
sh my supporting force, capture the guns, and open the river. The northern portion of Tennessee is unfavorable, from the extent of open country. He said he had asked Governor Magoffin for permission to fortify Columbus, adding: If he should withhold his consent, my present impression is that I shall go forward and occupy the work upon the ground of its necessity for protecting Tennessee. But Jefferson Davis had too great hopes of Kentucky to create enmity by forcing her neutrality, and Pillow's scheme was necessarily postponed. As the autumn approached, however, Kentucky was clearly lost to the Confederates. Of the members of Congress chosen at the election held June 20th, nine out of ten were loyal. At the general election held on the first Monday of August, the Unionists gained three-fourths of the members of each branch of the Legislature. Meanwhile the danger of a great Mississippi expedition from the North grew formidable. The lower Mississippi flows generally between l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
hirty-fourth New Jersey Volunteers, that, being placed there by his Government with adequate force to hold his post and repel all enemies from it, surrender was out of the question. On the morning of the same day A mistake. Forrest attacked Fort Pillow on April 12. Forrest attacked Fort Pillow, Tenn., garrisoned by a detachment of Tennessee cavalry and the First Regiment Alabama Colored Troops, commanded by Major Booth. The garrison fought bravely until about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, wheFort Pillow, Tenn., garrisoned by a detachment of Tennessee cavalry and the First Regiment Alabama Colored Troops, commanded by Major Booth. The garrison fought bravely until about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, when the enemy carried the works by assault, and, after our men threw down their arms, proceeded to an inhuman and merciless massacre — of the garrison. On the 14th General Buford, having failed at Columbus, appeared before Paducah, but was again driven off. For subordinate reports of Forrest's expedition into West Tennessee and Kentucky, see Vol. XXXII, Part I, p. 501. Guerrillas and raiders, seemingly emboldened by Forrest's operations, were also very active in Kentucky. The most noted of
Chapter 24: New Orleans. Although depressed by the loss of the victory virtually won by General Johnston at Shiloh, because someone had blundered after his death, the people were still far from being hopeless of final success. They knew that we were still masters of the river south of Fort Pillow, and they believed that we should be able still to retain the rich valley of the lower Mississippi. But general disappointment and a temporary feeling of alarm suddenly arose from an event unexpected, and never hitherto feared: the fall of New Orleans, which had been regarded as strong enough to repel the attacking force. Such also had been the belief of General Lovell, the military commander there, as late as December 5, 1861. Chains were stretched across the approaches to New Orleans, and obstructions sunk in the river at the narrowest points; the forts had been all strengthened; but all these were passed. Our new ram, the Jlississzippi, was destroyed by our forces, and all th
Chapter 31: Memphis, Vicksburg, and Baton Rouge. On June 7, 1862, a fleet of gun-boats steamed down the Tennessee River, flanking our positions on the Mississippi River, and a fleet moved down the Mississippi, bombarded Island No.10, reduced it, bombarded Fort Pillow and reduced that fort, and then attacked Memphis and took possession, after a manful resistance with an inadequate force. After this disaster followed close the siege of Vicksburg, which was repelled by the assistance of our ram, the Arkansas, under Captain J. N. Brown. From the 15th to the 18th of June, the enemy endeavored to sink the Arkansas with heavy shells from their mortars, and an attempt was made to cut her out from under the batteries; but it failed, with the loss of one of their boats. On the 27th both Federal fleets retired, and the siege, which had lasted sixtyseven days, was ended. Two powerful fleets had been foiled, and a land force of from 4,000 to 5,000 men held at bay. Then followed the battl
Chapter 36: introduction to 1863. The year 1863 opened drearily for the President, but the Confederates generally seemed to have, for some unexplained cause, renewed hope of recognition by England and France, and with this they felt sure of a successful termination of the struggle. Mr. Davis was oppressed by the fall of Donelson, Nashville, Corinth, Roanoke Island, New Orleans, Yorktown, Norfolk, Fort Pillow, Island No.10, Memphis, General Bragg's defeat at Murfreesboro, the burning of the Virginia and the ram Mississippi, the sinking of the Arkansas, and other minor disasters. The victory at Fredericksburg was the one bright spot in all this dark picture. Complaints from the people of the subjugated States came in daily. Women were set adrift across our borders with their children, penniless and separated from all they held dear. Their property was confiscated, the newspapers were suppressed, and the presses sold under the Confiscation act. In Tennessee, county o
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 49: Fort Pillow, Ocean Pond, and Meridian. (search)
Chapter 49: Fort Pillow, Ocean Pond, and Meridian. Fort Pillow, situated on the east bank of the Mississippi River, was established by the State of Tennessee in 1861. It was afterward fortified by the Confederate States, and effectually preveFort Pillow, situated on the east bank of the Mississippi River, was established by the State of Tennessee in 1861. It was afterward fortified by the Confederate States, and effectually prevented the passage of the Federal fleet. When the Confederates abandoned Corinth, Fort Pillow was necessarily evacuated also, and was immediately occupied by an inconsiderable Federal force. On April 12, 1864, an attack was made upon the fort by Fort Pillow was necessarily evacuated also, and was immediately occupied by an inconsiderable Federal force. On April 12, 1864, an attack was made upon the fort by two brigades of General N. B. Forrest's force, under Mississippi's gallant general, J. R. Chalmers. The Confederates gained the outer works and drove the garrison to their main fortifications. About this time General Forrest arrived and reconnounhurt constituted forty per cent. Campaign of Lieutenant-General N. B. Forrest. This was the so-called massacre of Fort Pillow. The year 1864 opened auspiciously for the Confederates, and their hopes rose high after each victory. On Febr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
vision, after deducting the losses of Wednesday, the troops left on the hill and companies on special service, consisted of some 4,500 men. It was drawn up in two lines, the first in a narrow skirt of woods, the second two hundred yards in rear. Pillow and Hanson formed the first line, Pillow on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supported Hanson. The artillery was placed in rear of the second line under orders to move with it and occupy the Pillow on the right. Preston supported Pillow, and Adams' brigade (commanded by Colonel Gibson) supported Hanson. The artillery was placed in rear of the second line under orders to move with it and occupy the summit of the slope as soon as the infantry should rout the enemy. Feeling anxious about my right, I sent two staff officers in succession to communicate with Pegram and Wharton, but received no intelligence up to the moment of assault. The interval between my left and the troops on the hill was already too great, but I had a battery to watch it with a small infantry support. There was nothing to prevent the enemy from observing nearly all our movements and preparations. To reach him it wa
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