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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 28 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908 8 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 1: the situation. (search)
d! Colonel W. H. Powell in his History of the Fifth Corps, published since the above was written, gives this total loss as 17,861. It does not appear whether he takes into account the losses of the Corps in the assault of June 18th on the salient covering the Norfolk Railroad and the Jerusalem Plank Road. Owing to the casualties among commanders, the action of that day has never been adequately reported. Colonel Powell had no data on which to base a just account of the overture of Forts Sedgwick and Mahone,--surnamed by the performers Fort Hell and Fort Damnation. Glance now at the record of the whole army. Those treated in the field hospitals up to the end of October were officially reported as numbering 57,498, and to the end of December, 68,840. Report of Surgeon McParlin, Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac. Some of these, no doubt were cases of sickness, a no less real casualty; but taking the ratio of one fifth the wounded as indicating the number of the ki
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 7: the return of the Army. (search)
xth and Ninth Corps and Gibbon with his men from the James burst over them in overwhelming wave. That silent, upheaved earth, those hidden covered ways,what did they speak of gloomy patience, and hardening fortitude and costly holding,--the farstretching, dull red crests and trenches which splendid manhood, we thought mistaken, had made a wall of adamant against us during all the long, dreary, unavailing siege; and as we look across the farther edge, the grim bastions of Fort Mahone and Fort Sedgwick,--not unfitly named in soldier speech Fort Hell and Fort Damnation, --the latter front carried a year before by the dark and desperate charge of my old veteran brigade; the forlorn Balaklava onset thereafter, and terrible repulse before the enemy's main entrenchments,--that darkest day of darkest year, 1864; and farther on, amidst the funereal pines, the spot where I was laid on boughs tearfully broken for what was thought my last bed, but where, too, Grant touched me with the accolade a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The colored troops at Petersburg. (search)
ater and adjacent lines. This charge on the left [our right] and rear of the crater was made by Sanders's brigade of Mahone's division, the 61st North Carolina of Hoke's division, and the 17th South Carolina of this division . . These movements were all conducted by General Mahone, while I took the 22d and 23d South Carolina into the crater and captured three colors and 130 prisoners. Previous to this charge the incessant firing kept up by our troops on both flanks and in rear had caused many of the enemy to run the gauntlet of our cross-fires in front of the breach, but a large number still remained unable to advance, and perhaps afraid to retreat. Thus ended in disaster what had at first promised to be a grand success. We were back within our old lines and badly cut up. We had inflicted a heavy, but by no means equal, loss on the enemy. Union picket Post in front of Fort Sedgwick and facing the Confederate picket line in front of Fort Mahone. From a War-time photograph.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
the arrival of the last courier I had dispatched. General Grant was sitting with most of the staff about him before a blazing camp-fire. He Outer works of Fort Sedgwick. Fort Sedgwick, known as Fort hell, opposite the Confederate Fort Mahone. From Photographs. Bomb-Proofs inside Fort Sedgwick. wore his blue cavalry oveFort Sedgwick, known as Fort hell, opposite the Confederate Fort Mahone. From Photographs. Bomb-Proofs inside Fort Sedgwick. wore his blue cavalry overcoat, and the ever-present cigar was in his mouth. I began shouting the good news as soon as I got in sight, and in a moment all but the imperturbable general-in-chief were on their feet giving vent to wild demonstrations of joy. For some minutes there was a bewildering state of excitement, grasping of hands, tossing up of hats, Fort Sedgwick. wore his blue cavalry overcoat, and the ever-present cigar was in his mouth. I began shouting the good news as soon as I got in sight, and in a moment all but the imperturbable general-in-chief were on their feet giving vent to wild demonstrations of joy. For some minutes there was a bewildering state of excitement, grasping of hands, tossing up of hats, and slapping of each other on the back. It meant the beginning of the end — the reaching of the last ditch. It pointed to peace and home. Dignity was thrown to the winds. The general, as was expected, asked his usual question: How many prisoners have been taken? This was always his first inquiry when an engagement was reported
ntage, but neither obtained much, save in the capture of Fort Harrison; while the losses of each had been quite heavy. Butler pushed forward a strong reconnoissance on the 13th, and assaulted some new works that the enemy had constructed on a part of their front; but they were firmly held, and the attack was not long persisted in. After a considerable pause, spiced only by cannonading and picket-firing along the intrenched front of both armies, and some sanguinary encounters around Fort Sedgwick (nicknamed by our soldiers Fort Hell) covering the Jerusalem plank-road, Gen. Grant again sounded a general advance. While Gen. Butler demonstrated in force on our extreme right — the 18th corps moving on the Richmond defenses by both the Charles City and Williamsburg roads — on our left, the Army of the Potomac, leaving only men enough to hold its works before Petersburg, and taking three days rations, marched Oct. 27. suddenly by the left against the enemy's works covering Hatcher'
. 5 Bethesda Church, Va. 2 Antietam, Md. 73 Petersburg Mine, Va. 13 Fredericksburg, Va. 12 Siege of Petersburg, Va. 6 Jackson, Miss. 2 Weldon Railroad, Va. 6 Knoxville, Tenn. 2 Poplar Spring Church, Va. 16 Spotsylvania, Va. 5 Fort Sedgwick, Va. 3 North Anna, Va. 2 Picket Line, Va., Dec. 27, ‘64 1 Present, also, at Campbell's Station, Tenn.; Wilderness, Va.; Cold Harbor, Va.; Hatcher's Run; Fall of Petersburg. notes.--Organized at Lynnfield, and left the State August 22 Va., May 13-20 4 Petersburg Mine, Va. 14 North Anna, Va. 1 Petersburg Trenches, Va. 17 Totopotomoy, Va. 1 Peeble's Farm, Va. 7 Shady Grove Road, Va. 2 Fall of Petersburg, Va. 7 Present, also, at Weldon Railroad; Hatcher's Run; Fort Sedgwick. notes.--Recruiting for this regiment commenced in September, 1863, but only eight companies were organized up to April, 1864. These companies left the State April 28, 1864. The ninth company joined the regiment in June, but the tenth di
tillery this day: The enemy's attack was frustrated mainly through the services of Captain Reade and Captain Tidball. Tidball emerged from the action with a brevet of major. He was brevetted lieut.-colonel for gallantry at Antietam on September 17th. At Gettysburg he commanded a brigade of horse artillery which he led in the Wilderness campaign, also, and was brevetted brigadier-general on August 1, 1864, brevetted major-general for gallant and meritorious services at Fort Stedman and Fort Sedgwick in the Petersburg campaign, and confirmed as a brigadier-general at the end of the war. the adjacent highlands, thus forming a screen from either side. The bridges crossing it had all been destroyed by the retreating army except the one at Mechanicsville, and it was not an easy task that awaited the forces of McClellan as they made their way across the spongy soil. The van of the Union army reached the Chickahominy on May 20th. The bridge was gone but the men under General Naglee
as these, Confederate works stretched for ten miles around Petersburg. Fort Mahone was situated opposite the Federal Fort Sedgwick at the point where the hostile lines converged most closely after the battle of the Crater. Owing to the constant cannonade which it kept up, the Federals named it Fort Damnation, while Fort Sedgwick, which was no less active in reply, was known to the Confederates as Fort Hell. Gracie's salient, further north on the Confederate line, is notable as the point in e the sinister burrow opens within the Confederate Fort Mahone, seen more fully at the top of the preceding page. Fort Sedgwick, directly opposite Fort Mahone, had been originally captured from the Confederates and its defenses greatly strengtheondition in which we see them pictured here. A position of complete defense, Fort Meikle The sweeping lines of Fort Sedgwick Fort rice, as the Confederates saw it thirty guns and pouring volley after volley of fierce fire into the ranks of
as these, Confederate works stretched for ten miles around Petersburg. Fort Mahone was situated opposite the Federal Fort Sedgwick at the point where the hostile lines converged most closely after the battle of the Crater. Owing to the constant cannonade which it kept up, the Federals named it Fort Damnation, while Fort Sedgwick, which was no less active in reply, was known to the Confederates as Fort Hell. Gracie's salient, further north on the Confederate line, is notable as the point in e the sinister burrow opens within the Confederate Fort Mahone, seen more fully at the top of the preceding page. Fort Sedgwick, directly opposite Fort Mahone, had been originally captured from the Confederates and its defenses greatly strengtheondition in which we see them pictured here. A position of complete defense, Fort Meikle The sweeping lines of Fort Sedgwick Fort rice, as the Confederates saw it thirty guns and pouring volley after volley of fierce fire into the ranks of
etched until they were so thin that there was constant danger of breaking. A. P. Hill was posted on the right; Gordon and Anderson held the center, and Longstreet was on the left. Union troops were mobilizing in front of Petersburg. By February 1st, Sherman was fairly off from Savannah on his northward march to join Grant. He was weak in cavalry and Siege of Petersburg. For nine months of 1864-1865 the musket-balls sang past these Federal picket posts, in advance of Federal Fort Sedgwick, called by the Confederates Fort Hell. Directly opposite was the Confederate Fort Mahone, which the Federals, returning the compliment, had dubbed Fort Damnation. Between the two lines, separated by only fifty yards, sallies and counter-sallies were continual occurrences after dark. In stealthy sorties one side or the other frequently captured the opposing pickets before alarm could be given. No night was without its special hazard. During the day the pastime here was sharp-shooting
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