hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 86 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Georgics (ed. J. B. Greenough) 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (ed. H. Rackham) 6 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Scythia or search for Scythia in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 4, scene 8 (search)
be adopted unless we agree with some of the Commentators, who think that Strobilus begins a sentence, and then, in the exuberance of his joy, breaks out into an expression of a different construction from that originally intended. It may, however, possibly be, as Hildyard suggests, the "nominativus pendens," which is not unfrequently used by Plautus. The Pici here alluded to, were Griffins, or fabulous monsters, who were said to watch the treasures of the Arimaspi, a people of the north of Scythia, mentioned by Herodotus, who were said to possess mountains of gold; in which story, no doubt, the Uralian mountians were alluded to., who inhabit the golden mountains, For I'm unwilling to make mention of those other kings, beggarly fellows--I am the king Philip. O charming day! for when I went from here, just now, I arrived there much the first, and, long before, I placed myself in a tree, and thence observed where the old fellow hid the gold. When he departed thence, I let myself down fr