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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 29: in Caddo. (search)
. But as a rule the poorer people in a district cannot seek new homes. Like plants and animals, they must brave their lot or sink into the soil. To many fugitives from Choctaw lodges and Chickasaw tents, Caddo has become a home. The site on which these outcasts have squatted is a piece of ground abandoned by the Caddoes, a small and wandering tribelet, who in former days --whipt these creeks for fish and raked these woods for game. Reduced in numbers, the Caddoes have moved into the Washita region, leaving their ancient hunting-fields to the coyotes and wolves. In theory the district lies in Choctaw country, but the Choctaws never occupied this valley, and the coming in of railway men, with teams and tools, induced the nearer families to move their lodges farther back. Caddo, abandoned to the iron horse and liberated slave, became a town. A Negro has no legal right to squat in Caddo, but squatting is the game of folks who stand outside the ordinary law. Others, besides unem