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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage with three tall ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M. James Lancaster, and written from the mouth of Edmund Barker of Ipswich, his lieutenant in the sayd voyage, by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
eadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagu we being not able for want of a boat to yeeld them any succour. From hence with heavie hearts we shaped our course for Zanzibar the 7 of November, where shortly after wee arrived and made us a new boat of such boards as we had within boord, and ri the huskes of Cocos shels beaten, whereof they make Occam. At length a Portugal Pangaia comming out of the harborow of Zanzibar , where they have a small Factorie, sent a Canoa with a Moore which had bene christened, who brought us a letter whereirength of which Frigate and their trecherous meaning we were advertised by an Arabian Moore which came from the king of Zanzibar divers times unto us about the deliverie of the priest aforesayd, and afterward by another which we caried thence along
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
h standeth about 11 degrees to the South of the equinoctial: in which island we stayed all November, finding the people blacke and very comly, but very treacherous and cruell: for the day before we departed from thence they killed thirty of our men on shore, among whom was William Mace our master, and two of his mates; the one of them being in the boat with him to fetch water, the other being on shore against our ship; they having first betrayed our boat. From hence we went for the isle of Zanzibar , on the coast of Melinde, whereas wee stayed and Wintered untill the beginning of February following. The second of February 1592 wee weyed anker, and set saile directly for the East Indies; but having calmes and contrary windes, wee were untill the moneth of June before wee could recover the coast of India neere Calicut ; whereby many of our men died for want of refreshing. In this moneth of June we came to an anker at the isles of Pulo pinaom, whereas we stayed untill the first da
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe note of a voyage to the East Indies, begun the 10 of April 1591, wherein were three tall ships, the Penelope of Captaine Raimond, Admirall, the Merchant royall, whereof was Captaine, Samuel Foxcroft, Viceadmirall, the Edward Bonaventure, whereof was Captaine, M. James Lancaster, Rere-admirall, with a small pinnesse. Written by Henry May, who in his returne homeward by the West Indies, suffred shipwracke upon the isle of Bermuda , wherof here is annexed a large description. (search)
h standeth about 11 degrees to the South of the equinoctial: in which island we stayed all November, finding the people blacke and very comly, but very treacherous and cruell: for the day before we departed from thence they killed thirty of our men on shore, among whom was William Mace our master, and two of his mates; the one of them being in the boat with him to fetch water, the other being on shore against our ship; they having first betrayed our boat. From hence we went for the isle of Zanzibar , on the coast of Melinde, whereas wee stayed and Wintered untill the beginning of February following. The second of February 1592 wee weyed anker, and set saile directly for the East Indies; but having calmes and contrary windes, wee were untill the moneth of June before wee could recover the coast of India neere Calicut ; whereby many of our men died for want of refreshing. In this moneth of June we came to an anker at the isles of Pulo pinaom, whereas we stayed untill the first da
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
ance of meeting him, and getting the first intelligence, Stanley is to go to Aden, and use his discretion as to going to Zanzibar. It looks like a wild-goose chase, but his, not to make reply; his, not to reason why ; and he is off to Aden, which he reaches November 21, 1868. Not a word can he learn of Livingstone. He writes enquiries to Consul Webb at Zanzibar, and, in the wretched and sun-scorched little town, sets himself to wait; but not in idleness. He works the Magdala campaign into bopped up since I had entered the Army [i. e., during the Civil War]. And now, at last,--for Africa and Livingstone! Zanzibar is to be his starting-point; there is no direct communication from Bombay; so he must creep and zig-zag, by irregular san, my mind becomes old, and all because of these dispiriting calms. December 31st, 1870. Eighty days from Bombay, and Zanzibar, at last! But to find what? No letters from Bennett, nor his agent; so, of course, no money. No news of Livingstone
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
f Livingstone had been heard by any mortal at Zanzibar. According to one, he was dead; and, accordio and search for the traveller; and no one at Zanzibar was prepared to advance thousands of dollars they known the circumstances of my arrival at Zanzibar, they would have had greater reason for their of three whites, thirty-one armed freemen of Zanzibar, as escort, one hundred and fifty-three porte Sayed bin Majid, a relative of the Prince of Zanzibar; to Mahommed bin Sali, the Governor of Ujiji;aravan bound coastward, he writes a letter to Zanzibar in 1867, and directs that goods should be senhere is nothing there for him; but a draft on Zanzibar suffices to purchase, at an extortionate char the news that the strangers are friends from Zanzibar. In a few minutes the news becomes more dey after leaving Dr. Livingstone, I arrived at Zanzibar. Two weeks later, that is on the 20th May, f chosen people of good character, sailed from Zanzibar for the mainland, as the expeditionary force
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.19 (search)
owers, numbering about three-score negroes of Zanzibar, deliberated upon their future movements. Tod! Think of us a few weeks later, arrived at Zanzibar, where we make our final preparations for the long journey we are about to make. Zanzibar is an island, as I suppose you know, situate three h, ammunition, and guns. It was in a house at Zanzibar that we rolled these cloths into seventy-pounre fired off at me, about my health, journey, Zanzibar, Europe and its nations, the oceans, and the Ocean, the missionaries for Uganda arrived at Zanzibar, the island we had left nineteen months previs about it. It is now nine years since I left Zanzibar. After a while, he called a man named Abedge, then strike across to Uganda, and back to Zanzibar? Ah, that would be a fine job, sir, if wecompanied them round the Cape of Good Hope to Zanzibar, where, in good time, we arrived, to the greathe Congo, around the Cape, to their homes in Zanzibar, so removing their depression arising from th[2 more...]
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.20 (search)
4--which he spent in the work. The story of that work is told at large in Stanley's book, The Congo, and the Founding of its free State. Less full of adventure and wonder than his preceding and following works, it is rich in material for whoever studies the relations, actual and possible, between civilised and savage men. The merest outline of it is given here, with quotations chosen mainly to illustrate the character of its leader. For the nucleus of his working force, he went back to Zanzibar, and chose seventy men, forty of whom had before gone with him through Africa, and who, as a body, now served him with a like fidelity and devotion. He took them around the continent, by Suez and Gibraltar, and reached the mouth of the Congo in August, 1879. August 15, 1879. Arrived off the mouth of the Congo. Two years have passed since I was here before, after my descent of the great River, in 1877. Now, having been the first to explore it, I am to be the first who shall prove its
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
ies,--so great was the number of applications to join in the adventurous quest! The route resolved upon was that from Zanzibar westward, via the south end of Lake Victoria, through Karagwe and Ankori and South-west Unyoro, to Lake Albert; but, abo that, behind this professedly humanitarian quest, we might have annexation projects. A native force was recruited in Zanzibar, and the expedition travelled by sea to the mouth of the Congo, and went up the river, arriving March 21, 1887, at Stanlocean and river. German and French jealousies had been dissipated; between our professional deserters and their island, Zanzibar, was half a continent, and much of it unknown. Now was the time, if ever, to prove that our zeal had not cooled. Six wth December, 1889, Emin Pasha, Captain Casati, and myself were escorted by Major Wissmann to Bagamoyo, the port opposite Zanzibar; and, in the afternoon, the porters of the expedition filed in, to lay their weary burdens of sick and moaning fellow-cr
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
— before he could be enrolled. Four months advance wages were paid to the men before they left Zanzibar, and, on their return, their full wages were delivered into their own hands. No doubt many whoand Bombay, Calcutta, Singapore, and Yoko-hama. All the British consulates on the East Coast — Zanzibar, Madagascar, etc.--would have to be charged with conniving at the slave-trade, as also all the -owner, and agreeing with him as to the employment of his slaves. I employed English agents at Zanzibar to engage my people, and every precaution was taken that no one was enlisted who could not swear he was an Ingwaria, or freeman. I was only four days in Zanzibar, but, before these men were accepted, they had to re-swear their declarations before the British Consul-general that they were free.ere I had been speaking, the news reached me that Lord Salisbury had secured for Great Britain, Zanzibar and the northern half of East Africa, but singularly curtailed of the extensive piece of pastur
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
callous indifference shown by the Rosebery Government. Sir William had for years (since 1878) been feeling his way towards this great achievement. By dint of generosity, long continued, he finally won the confidence of successive Sultans of Zanzibar, especially Syyed Barghash, and when once that confidence was established, he gradually developed his projects, by which he, as well as the Sultan, might greatly profit. Being already rich enough for gratifying his very simple wants, he wished lls, wee-wee, of the mice behind the white wainscoting! May his covering of earth lie lightly, and his soul be in perfect communion with his loved dead! December 12th, 1893. Sir Charles and Lady, Euan Smith and wife, Mr. E. L. Berkley, of Zanzibar, and Mr. H. Babington Smith lunched with us. Sir Charles told me that he once said to Emin Pasha, Well, Pasha, the whole of Europe is expecting you! There are lots of invitations awaiting your convenience! Emin replied, Ah! I can't go yet.
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