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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 40 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 22 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 16 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 8 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Ethiopia (Ethiopia) or search for Ethiopia (Ethiopia) in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 7 (search)
believe, as I know that the god at Delphi confirms the story. For when he despatched Archias the Corinthian to found Syracuse he uttered this oracle:An isle, Ortygia, lies on the misty oceanOver against Trinacria, where the mouth of Alpheius bubblesMingling with the springs of broad Arethusa.For this reason, therefore, because the water of the Alpheius mingles with the Arethusa, I am convinced that the legend arose of the river's love-affair. Those Greeks or Egyptians who have gone up into Ethiopia beyond Syene as far as the Ethiopian city of Meroe all say that the Nile enters a lake, and passes through it as though it were dry land, and that after this it flows through lower Aethiopia into Egypt before coming down into the sea at Pharos. And in the land of the Hebrews, as I can myself bear witness, the river Jordan passes through a lake called Tiberias, and then, entering another lake called the Dead Sea, it disappears in it. The Dead Sea has the opposite qualities to those of any o
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Boeotia, chapter 21 (search)
light of the sun it appeared to be a homogeneous red, either because of its speed, or, if it were not running, because of its continual twists and turns, especially when it was not seen at close quarters. And I think that if one were to traverse the most remote parts of Libya, India or Arabia, in search of such beasts as are found in Greece, some he would not discover at all, and others would have a different appearance. For man is not the only creature that has a different appearance in different climates and in different countries; the others too obey the same rule. For instance, the Libyan asps have a different colors compared with the Egyptian, while in Ethiopia are bred asps quite as black as the men. So everyone should be neither over-hasty in one's judgments, nor incredulous when considering rarities. For instance, though I have never seen winged snakes I believe that they exist, as I believe that a Phrygian brought to Ionia a scorpion with wings exactly like those of locusts.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 31 (search)
ands lies on Sarpedon's shoulder. All are bearded; and on the cloak of Memnon are embroidered birds. Their name is Memnonides, and the people of the Hellespont say that on stated days every year they go to the grave of Memnon, and sweep all that part of the tomb that is bare of trees or grass, and sprinkle it with the water of the Aesepus from their wet wings. Beside Memnon is depicted a naked Ethiopian boy, because Memnon was king of the Ethiopian nation. He came to Troy, however, not from Ethiopia, but from Susa in Persia and from the river Choaspes, having subdued all the peoples that lived between these and Troy. The Phrygians still point out the road through which he led his army, picking out the shortest routes. The road is divided up by halting-places.With the suggested emendations: “is cut through the mountains” or “is cut through the territory of the people of Meros.” Beyond Sarpedon and Memnon is Paris, as yet beardless. He is clapping his hands like a boor, and you will sa