hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 70 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 42 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 16 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Pythian 4 (ed. Steven J. Willett) 10 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 8 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Cyrene (Libya) or search for Cyrene (Libya) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), Introduction, THE SUBJECT (search)
THE SUBJECT DÆMONES, an aged Athenian, having lost his property, goes to live in retirement near the sea-shore of Cyrene, in the vicinity of the Temple of Venus. It so happens that Labrax, a Procurer, makes purchase of two damsels, Palæstra and Ampelisca, and comes to reside at Cyrene. Plesidippus, a young Athenian, sees Palæstra there, and falls in love with her; and making an arrangement with the Procurer, gives him a sum in part payment for her, on which occasion, Labrax invites him to a saCyrene. Plesidippus, a young Athenian, sees Palæstra there, and falls in love with her; and making an arrangement with the Procurer, gives him a sum in part payment for her, on which occasion, Labrax invites him to a sacrifice in the Temple of Venus. A Sicilian guest of his, however, named Charmides, persuades him to carry the young women over to Sicily, where he is sure to make a greater profit by them. On this, the Procurer, accompanied by his guest, sets sail with them. A tempest arises, and they are shipwrecked. The young women escape in a boat, and arriving ashore, are hospitably received by the Priestess of Venus. Labrax and Charmides also escape, and on discovering where the women are, the former attemp
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act prologue, scene 0 (search)
ospect of the sea, interspersed with rocks in the distance, while others project upon the front of the stage. The City of Cyrene is also seen in the distance; while nearer to the Audience is the Temple of Venus, with an altar in front of it; and adjo, from whom Plautus is supposed to have borrowed the plot of several of his Plays. has willed the name of this city to be CyreneCyrene: This was a famous city of Libya, said to have been founded by Aristæus, the son of the Nymph Cyrene. It was situaCyrene: This was a famous city of Libya, said to have been founded by Aristæus, the son of the Nymph Cyrene. It was situate in a fertile plain, about eleven miles from the Mediterranean, and was the capital of a district called "Pentapolis," from the five cities which it contained.. There pointing to the cottage dwells Dæmones, in the country and in a cottage very clos them out for the purposes of prostitution. The "lenones' were deservedly reckoned infamous. brought the maiden hither to Cyrene. A certain Athenian youth, a citizen of this city, beheld her as she was going home from the music-school. He begins to l
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 2 (search)
Enter TRACHALIO, in haste, from the Temple. TRACHALIO aloud. O citizens of Cyrene, I implore your aid, countrymen, you who are near neighbours to these spots, bring aid to helplessness, and utterly crush a most vile attempt. Inflict vengeance, that the power of the wicked, who wish themselves to be distinguished by crimes, may not be stronger than of the guiltless. Make an example for the shameless man, give its reward to modest virtue; cause that one may be allowed to live here rather under the control of the laws than of brute force. Hasten hither into the Temple of Venus; again do I implore your aid, you who are here at hand and who hear my cries. Bring assistance to those who, after the recognized usage, have entrusted their lives to Venus and to the Priestess of Venus, under their protection. Wring ye the neck of iniquity before it reaches yourselves. DÆM. What's all this to-do? TRACHALIO embracing his knees. By these knees of yours, I do entreat you, old gentleman, whoever you