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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 2, chapter 158 (search)
Psammetichus had a son, Necos, who became king of Egypt. It was he who began building the canal into the Red Sea,This canal ran from near Tel Basta (Bubastis) apparently to Suez. Inscriptions recording Darius' construction of it have been found in the neighborhood. which was finished by Darius the Persian. This is four days' voyage in length, and it was dug wide enough for two triremes to move in it rowed abreast. It is fed by the Nile, and is carried from a little above Bubastis by the Arabian town of Patumus; it issues into the Red Sea. Digging began in the part of the Egyptian plain nearest to Arabia; the mountains that extend to Memphis (the mountains where the stone quarries are) come close to this plain; the canal is led along the foothills of these mountains in a long reach from west to east; passing then into a ravine, it bears southward out of the hill country towards the Arabian Gulf. Now the shortest and most direct passage from the northern to the southern or Red Sea is f
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 2, section 320 (search)
anded by God to return back, Exodus 14:2, and to pitch their camp between Migdol and the sea; and that when they were not able to fly, unless by sea, they were shut in on each side by mountains. He also thought we might evidently learn hence, how it might be said that the Israelites were in Etham before they went over the sea, and yet might be said to have come into Etham after they had passed over the sea also. Besides, he gave me an account how he passed over a river in a boat near the city Suez, which he says must needs be the Heroopolia of the ancients, since that city could not be situate any where else in that neighborhood." between inaccessible precipices and the sea; for there was [on each side] a [ridge of] mountains that terminated at the sea, which were impassable by reason of their roughness, and obstructed their flight; wherefore they there pressed upon the Hebrews with their army, where [the ridges of] the mountains were closed with the sea; which army they placed at the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . (search)
ore in this our voyage wee will onely make mention of certaine Castles found in the way, which bee these, namely, Agerut, Nachel, Acba, Biritem, Muel , and Ezlem. Of which five, the two first are kept of Moores, and the other three of Turkes, and for guard they have eight men or tenne at the most in every Castle, with foure or five Smerigli, which serve to keepe the water from the Arabians, so that the Carovan comming thither, may have wherewithall to refresh it selfe. Agerut is distant from Suez a port of the red Sea eight miles, where are alwayes resident five and twentie gallies of the Grand Signior for the keeping of that Sea. Nachel is distant from the Sea a dayes journey. The walles of Acba are founded upon the red Sea banke. Biritem and Muel likewise are dashed by the waves of the Sea. Ezlem is distant from thence above a dayes journey. These five Castles abovesayd are not of force altogether to defend themselves agaynst an hundred men. The Carovan departing from Birca un
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of things notable which are seene in this voyage by the way. (search)
ore in this our voyage wee will onely make mention of certaine Castles found in the way, which bee these, namely, Agerut, Nachel, Acba, Biritem, Muel , and Ezlem. Of which five, the two first are kept of Moores, and the other three of Turkes, and for guard they have eight men or tenne at the most in every Castle, with foure or five Smerigli, which serve to keepe the water from the Arabians, so that the Carovan comming thither, may have wherewithall to refresh it selfe. Agerut is distant from Suez a port of the red Sea eight miles, where are alwayes resident five and twentie gallies of the Grand Signior for the keeping of that Sea. Nachel is distant from the Sea a dayes journey. The walles of Acba are founded upon the red Sea banke. Biritem and Muel likewise are dashed by the waves of the Sea. Ezlem is distant from thence above a dayes journey. These five Castles abovesayd are not of force altogether to defend themselves agaynst an hundred men. The Carovan departing from Birca un
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.15 (search)
ons in a sensible and gallant fellow. As a correspondent he scored a marked success, for which he had good fortune, as well as his own pains, to thank. On his way out, he had made private arrangements with the chief of the telegraph office, at Suez, about transmitting his despatches. My telegrams, he notes in the Journal, are to be addressed to him, and he will undertake that there shall be no delay in sending them to London, for which services I am to pay handsomely if, on my return, I hea. In the Red Sea, the steamer stuck aground for four days; and, under the broiling heat, an exchange of chaff between a colonel and captain generated wrath and a prospective duel; Stanley's mediation was accepted; reconciliation, champagne, and — Suez at last; but only to face five days of quarantine! Stanley manages to get a long despatch ashore, to his friend in the telegraph office. It is before all the others, and is hurried off; then the cable between Alexandria and Malta breaks, and for
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
nd good taste, and all that sort of thing, are to be dreaded for their propensity to gossip, for it is always malicious and vile. Oh, how I should like to discover my island, and be free of them! Apropos of this, it reminds me of my journey to Suez last November. Two handsome young fellows, perhaps a year or so younger than myself, were fellow-passengers in the same coupe. They were inexperienced and shy. I was neither the one, nor, with the pride of age, was I the other. I had provided my next, and, being entertainer, as it were, I did my best for the sake of good fellowship, and I talked of Goshen, Pithom, A city of Egypt mentioned in Exodus i, 11, along with Rameses. and Rameses, Moses' Wells, and what not. We came at last to Suez, and, being known at the hotel, I was at once served with a room. While I was washing, I heard voices. I looked up; my room was separated from the next by an eight-foot partition. In the next room were my young friends of the journey, and they
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.20 (search)
the nucleus of his working force, he went back to Zanzibar, and chose seventy men, forty of whom had before gone with him through Africa, and who, as a body, now served him with a like fidelity and devotion. He took them around the continent, by Suez and Gibraltar, and reached the mouth of the Congo in August, 1879. August 15, 1879. Arrived off the mouth of the Congo. Two years have passed since I was here before, after my descent of the great River, in 1877. Now, having been the first tal nature, involved dangers which it was doubtless well he did not wholly foresee, for they might have daunted even his spirit. He broke down the wall between a savage and a civilised people, and the tides rushed together, as at the piercing of Suez. On either side were both lifting and lowering forces. The faults and weakness of the savage were plain to see; his merit and his promise not so easy of discernment. But the civilised influences, too, were extremely mixed. There was the infec
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
except as means of drilling volunteers; then I came to a tall monument to Nelson — at a point of land given up to rubbish and net-drying, when I found that I had been travelling parallel with the Yare, and was now at its mouth. I crossed this point, and on coming to the river, walked up along the interesting quay. I was well rewarded, for as picturesque a sight as can be found in any sea-side town, in any country, met me. The river is narrow, not quite the width of the Maritime Canal of Suez, I should say, but every inch of it seems serviceable to commerce. The useful stream is crowded with coast shipping, trawlers, luggers, small steamers, and inland barges, which lie mainly in a long line alongside this quay. It did my heart good to see the deep-bellied, strong, substantial vessels of the fisher-class, and still more entertainment I obtained in viewing the types of men who handled the fish, and the salt. The seed of the old vikings and Anglian invaders of Britain were all ro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Great Eastern, the. (search)
me, also, the British government occasionally employed her as a transport ship. In 1867 she was again fitted up for a passenger vessel to ply between New York and Europe; sailed for New York March 26, 1867, with accommodations for 2,000 firstclass passengers, and returned with 191, and was immediately seized by the seamen as security for their unpaid wages. After this matter was adjusted, the vessel was leased by a cable construction company. She laid the French Atlantic telegraph cable in 1869; went to the Persian Gulf and laid the cable from Bombay to Suez in 1870; in 1873 laid the fourth Atlantic telegraph cable; in 1874 laid the fifth, and was further used to some extent in cable construction. When there seemed to be no more use for her in that line, she was made to serve as a show. After the vessel had been tried by the government as a coal barge, and proved too unwieldy to do good service, she was condemned to be broken up and sold as junk. Great Lakes and the Navy, the
is 190 feet. The least bottom width is 72 feet. The highest ground cut through is at El Guisr, where it is 85 feet; at Serapeum it is 62 feet; and at Chalouf, near Suez, it is 56 feet. The excavation of the canal, although of considerable difficulty, was exceeded by the necessity for creating artificial harbors at the extremitily at anchor. At the other extremity of the canal, a mole 2,550 feet in length protects the channel, which has been dredged to the depth of 27 feet. The mole at Suez differs from that at Port Said in construction; the latter being formed of concrete blocks of 13 cubic feet, the former of stone quarried from the neighboring moueet-pea, a measure of weight among the Arabs, equal to four grains of barley. Car′a-van. (Vehicle.) a. A vehicle for conveying passengers between Cairo and Suez. It is shaped like a light wagon, with top and curtains. A number of them used to meet the passengers arriving by the Red Sea or Mediterranean steam vessels, and
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