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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Scotia or search for Scotia in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colony of Virginia, (search)
. A compromise with the loyalists was effected. Berkeley gave way to Richard Bennett, one of the commissioners, who became governor. But when Charles II. was restored, Berkeley, who had not left Virginia, was reinstated; the laws of the colony were revived; restrictive revenue laws were enforced; the Church of England—disestablished in Virginia—was re-established, and severe legislative acts against Non-conformists were passed. Berkeley proclaimed Charles II. King of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Virginia, and ruled with vigor. Under Berkeley, the colonists had become discontented, and in 1676 they broke out into open rebellion, led by a wealthy and enterprising young lawyer named Nathaniel Bacon (q. v.). Charles II. had given a patent for Virginia (1673) to two of his rapacious courtiers (Arlington and Culpeper), and in 1677 the latter superseded Berkeley as governor. He arrived in Virginia in 1680, and his rapacity and profligacy soon so disgusted the people that they w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warden, David Bailie 1778-1845 (search)
Warden, David Bailie 1778-1845 Author; born in Ireland in 1778; graduated at the New York Medical College; was United States consul at Paris in 1805-45. His publications include Inquiry concerning the intellectual and moral faculties and Literature of the negroes; Origin and nature of consular establishments; Description of the District of Columbia; Statistical, political, and Historical account of the United States of North America (3 volumes); Inquiry into the antiquities of North America; etc. He died in Paris, France, Oct. 9, 1845.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warren, Sir Peter 1702-1752 (search)
Warren, Sir Peter 1702-1752 Naval officer; born in Ireland, in 1702; entered the British navy in 1727, and was commodore in 1745, when he commanded an expedition against Louisburg, joining the land forces from Massachusetts under General Pepperell. He took possession of Louisburg on June 17. Afterwards he was made a rear-admiral, and, in 1747, defeated the French in an action off Cape Finisterre, capturing the greater part of their fleet. Admiral Warren married the eldest daughter of Sthusetts under General Pepperell. He took possession of Louisburg on June 17. Afterwards he was made a rear-admiral, and, in 1747, defeated the French in an action off Cape Finisterre, capturing the greater part of their fleet. Admiral Warren married the eldest daughter of Stephen De Lancey, of New York, and became the owner of a large tract of land in the Mohawk region, in charge of which he placed his nephew, William Johnson, afterwards Sir William. Sir Peter died in Ireland, July 29, 1752.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Westminster Abbey. (search)
lyric sweetness and his white purity of soul. Between the monuments of Philips and Drayton there is one which will have a melancholy interest for the visitor from across the Atlantic. It is that of Barton Booth, the actor, who died in 1733. His passion for acting was first stimulated by the applause which he won at the annual play of Terence, performed by the Westminster boys. He was at Westminster under the plagosus Orbilius of the school, the celebrated Dr. Busby, and he escaped to Ireland to go on the stage. Among his lineal descendants are Mr. Edwin Booth, distinguished like his ancestor for his Shakespearian representations, and Wilkes Booth, the assassin of Lincoln in Ford's Theatre, Washington, on Good Friday, 1865. How many destinies, how many generations, were influenced by the applause given to a dashing Westminster boy about the year 1695! While we are in Poets' Corner we may as well save time by stepping into the ancient chapter-house, in which were held not on
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whigs and Tories. (search)
Whigs and Tories. The word Whig, in politics, is derived from whig, or whey, which the country people in the interior of England drank at their religious meetings. As these people were Non-conformists, in Church and State, in the reign of Charles II. and James II., the term Whig came to be applied to all opposers of the throne and of the hierarchy. The word Tory seems to have been first applied to the Irish insurgents at the time of a massacre of Protestants in Ireland in 1640-41. The origin of the word is unknown. The name was applied to all High-Churchmen and royalists, and hence the name of Whig was given to all opposers of the royal government, and Tory to its supporters. This is the commonly received statement concerning these political names. Another account says that the drivers of horses in certain parts of Scotland used the word whiggamore in driving, and were called Whiggamores, and, shorter, Whigs. An insurrectionary movement from that region, when about 6,000
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White House, the, Washington, D. C. (search)
White House, the, Washington, D. C. In Washington, D. C., the residence of the President of the United States. The building is architecturally attractive, being a model of the palace of the Duke of Leinster in Ireland. It is constructed of sandstone; is two stories high, 170 × 86 feet, with a colonnade of eight Ionic columns in front and a semicircular portico in the rear; and derives its name from the fact that the exterior is painted white. The cornerstone was laid in 1792; the building was first occupied by President Adams in 1800, who held the first New Year's reception in it on Jan. 1, 1801; was burned by the British in 1814; and was restored in 1818. The front door is on the north side of the building, and opens from a pillared private portion of the house. On the left-hand side is a hall from which rises the staircase that is climbed by all the people who go to see the President on business. From this supplementary hall opens the great East Room that occupies one en
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), William iii. (William Henry, Prince of Orange) 1650-1702 (search)
breach between the King and his Dutch son-in-law was inevitable. The people of England finally rose in their might and invited William to invade the country. It was done in 1688. He and his wife were made joint monarchs of England in February, 1689, by a William iii., Prince of Orange. special convention. His cause was equally triumphant in Scotland, after some trouble at the beginning, and he joined a coalition of European states in making war on France. The adherents of James in Ireland were numerous, and were supported by the French. In 1690 he took command of his own troops there, and, at the battle of the Boyne, July 1 (O. S.), James, who led the insurgents, was defeated and fled to France. The war continued till 1697, when the treaty at Ryswick ended it. Queen Mary died late in 1694, when William became sole monarch. He instituted salutary reforms in England, and the English constitution was placed on a firm basis. He labored to check the power of France and incre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), William and Mary, Fort (search)
of powder, which, carted down to Charlestown, saved the wearied battalions of Prescott and Stark from capture or annihilation. Sullivan was born at Somerworth, New Hampshire, in 1740. His father was in the Pretender's service, and fled from Ireland to America. His mother also emigrated from Ireland when a young girl. During the voyage a passenger laughingly asked of her, And what do you expect to do over in America? Do? was the reply; why, raise governors for them, sure. (One of herIreland when a young girl. During the voyage a passenger laughingly asked of her, And what do you expect to do over in America? Do? was the reply; why, raise governors for them, sure. (One of her sons was governor of Massachusetts; a grandson was governor of Maine, another was only lately a United States Senator from New Hampshire, and still another was lieutenant-governor of Illinois.) The most famous of her sons, John Sullivan, was married at twenty, and opened a law office in Durham. There were then but two lawyers in the entire colony. The profession was apparently not regarded with favor, for, on the coming of Sullivan, it is a tradition that the good citizens about Durham Fa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Willis, Nathaniel Parker 1806- (search)
ns of his life there were exquisitely limned in his Pencillings by the way, published in the Mirror. He was attached to the American legation in Paris. He married in England; returned to the United States; settled on the Susquehanna; and during his four years residence there wrote his Letters from under a Bridge. In 1839 he and Dr. Porter established The corsair, in New York. He went again to England; wrote much while there; and prepared for Mr. Virtue the letter-press for two serial works, illustrated by Bartlett, on the scenery of Ireland and America. Returning in 1844, he and General Morris established the Evening mirror. His health soon gave way, and he again went abroad. He returned in 1846, after which until his death, in Idlewild, Cornwall, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1867, he was co-editor with Morris of the Home journal. His prose writings are more numerous by far than his poetry, yet he ranks among the distinguished American poets. Willis's sacred poetry is considered his best.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wrecks. (search)
a. pleasure trip, capsizes off Barren Island, Jamaica Bay, N. Y.; twenty-five lives lost......July 10, 1887 American ship Alfred D. Snow stranded off coast of Ireland; thirty lives lost......Jan. 4, 1888 Steamer Vizcaya, from New York to Havana, run into by schooner Cornelius Hargraves near Barnegat light, N. J.; both vessel, out of Dublin; 122 lives lost......Feb. 19, 1841 Emigrant ship Edmund, with nearly 200 passengers from Limerick to New York, wrecked off the western coast of Ireland; about 100 lives lost......Nov. 12, 1850 Steamship St. George, from Liverpool to New York, with 121 emigrants and a crew of twenty-nine seamen, destroyed by fimouth of the Thames; 157 lives lost (many emigrants)......Dec. 6, 1875 Bark Ponema collides with the steamship State of Florida about 1,200 miles from coast of Ireland; both vessels sink; only thirty-five out of 180 persons saved......April 18, 1884 For the list of vessels sailing from port and never afterwards heard of, see
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