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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Irish sympathy with the abolition movement. (search)
of Commons, he asked, without putting out his hand, Are you from the South? Yes, sir. A slave-holder, I presume? Yes, sir. Then, said the great liberator, I have no hand for you! and stalked away. Shall his countrymen trust that hand with political power which O'Connell deemed it pollution to touch? [Cheers.] We remember, Mr. Chairman, that when a jealous disposition tore from the walls of the city hall of Dublin the picture of Henry Grattan, the act did but endear him the more to Ireland. The slavocracy of our land thinks to expel that old man eloquent, with the dignity of seventy winters on his brow [pointing to the picture of John Quincy Adams], from the halls of Congress. They will find him only the more lastingly fixed in the hearts of his countrymen. [Tremendous and continued cheers.] Mr. Chairman, we stand in the presence of at least the name of Father Mathew; we remember the millions who pledge themselves to temperance from his lips. I hope his countrymen will
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Welcome to George Thompson (1840). (search)
whether his voice cheered the starving Hindoo crushed beneath British selfishness, or Hungary battling against treason and the Czar; whether he pleaded at home for bread and the ballot, or held up with his sympathy the ever-hopeful enthusiasm of Ireland,--every true word spoken for suffering man, is so much done for the negro bending beneath the weight of American bondage. [Cheers.] It is said that the earthquake of Lisbon tossed the sea in billows on the coast of Cuba; so no indignant heart ie of the house. Mistaken man! how wild in him, an invalid, to take so Northerly a view of this great question! [Cheers.] But for this, like the pliant Irishman, he might have moved in the best society! Could he but have chanced to be born in Ireland, and have early contracted the habit of kissing the Blarney stone of every nation, instead of shivering here beneath that North Star,--which South Carolina, it is said, intends to forbid her pilots to steer by, it is so incendiary a twinkler! [
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Kossuth (1851). (search)
ociates, if you will close your mouth on the slave question, you may reckon on our undivided support on Irish matters. Whenever your country's claims come up, you shall be sure of fifty votes on your side. No! said O'Connell; let God care for Ireland; I will never shut my mouth on the slave question to save her! [Loud cheers.] He stood with eight millions whom he loved; he stood with & peasantry at his back meted out and trodden under foot as cruelly as the Magyar; he stood with those behi us in the House of Commons, O'Connell would leave any court or any meeting to be present at the division, and vote on our side. That is the type of a man who tries by its proper standard the claims of all classes upon his sympathy. He did for Ireland all that God had enabled him to do; but there was one thing which God had not called upon him to do, and that was to speak a falsehood, or to belie his convictions. He did not undertake to serve his country by being silent when he knew he ought
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The scholar in a republic (1881). (search)
for discussion or that is the time, they will be laughed at another century as fools, and kicked for another century as slaves. Byron called England's Union with Ireland the union of the shark with his prey. Bentham's conclusion, from a survey of five hundred years of European history, was, Only by making the ruling few uneasy caanded at the sword's point. And a century later, only last year, Gladstone himself proclaimed in a public address in Scotland, England never concedes anything to Ireland except when moved to do so by fear. When we remember these admissions, we ought to clap our hands at every fresh Irish outrage, as a parrot-press styles it, awmen who made North's Boston port-bill a failure, while every leading journal sends daily over the water wishes for the success of Gladstone's copy of the bill for Ireland. If all rightful government rests on consent,--if, as the French say, you can do almost anything with a bayonet except sit on it, --be at least consistent, and d
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Daniel O'Connell (1875.) (search)
n the academy. All these gave their lives to Ireland; and when the present century opened, where wn spite of Saxon-Protestant hate, to lift all Ireland to the level of British citizenship,--this waeader would have snapped the chain that bound Ireland to his throne. His ministers recognized it; ds of civil equality. O'Connell did this for Ireland,--this which no Irishman before had ever dreanother; but, after all, they left the helm of Ireland's destiny in foreign and hostile hands. O'Co than all, he was a statesman, for he gave to Ireland's own keeping the key of her future. As LordHe had transformed the whole social system of Ireland; almost reversed the relative positions of Prmpire. Its share in the British empire makes Ireland's strength and importance. Standing alone amthe next, O'Connell was wise in claiming that Ireland's rights would never be safe without home rull was listened to because all England and all Ireland knew that there was a man behind the speech,-[9 more...]