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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 86 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 18 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 10 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 6 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 4 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War. You can also browse the collection for Memphis (Egypt) or search for Memphis (Egypt) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 1, chapter 104 (search)
Libyan king of the Libyans on the Egyptian border, having his head-quarters at Marea, the town above Pharos, caused a revolt of almost the whole of Egypt from King Artaxerxes, and placing himself at its head, invited the Athenians to his assistance. Abandoning a Cyprian expedition upon which they happened to be engaged with two hundred ships of their own and their allies, they arrived in Egypt and sailed from the sea into the Nile, and making themselves masters of the river and two-thirds of Memphis, addressed themselves to the attack of the remaining third, which is called White Castle. Within it were Persians and Medes who had taken refuge there, and Egyptians who had not joined the rebellion.
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 1, chapter 109 (search)
ians to invade Attica and so draw off the Athenians from Egypt. Finding that the matter made no progress, and that the money was only being wasted, he recalled Megabazus with the remainder of the money, and sent Megabuzus, son of Zopyrus, a Persian, with a large army to Egypt. Arriving by land he defeated the Egyptians and their allies in a battle, and drove the Hellenes out of Memphis, and at length shut them up in the island of Prosopitis, where he besieged them for a year and six months. At last, draining the canal of its waters, which he diverted into another channel, he left their ships high and dry and joined most of the island to the mainland, and then marched over on foot and captured it.