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Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 40 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 16 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Lycia (Turkey) or search for Lycia (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
p they waged war for the kingdom,So the twins Esau and Jacob quarrelled both in the womb and in after life (Genesis, xxv.21ff.). Compare Rendel Harris, Boanerges, pp. 279ff. who argues that Proetus was the elder twin, who, as in the case of Esau and Jacob, was worsted by his younger brother. and in the course of the war they were the first to invent shields. And Acrisius gained the mastery and drove Proetus from Argos; and Proetus went to Lycia to the court of Iobates or, as some say, of Amphianax, and married his daughter, whom Homer calls Antia,Hom. Il. 6.160. but the tragic poets call her Stheneboea.See below, Apollod. 2.3.1, Apollod. 3.9.1. Euripides called her Stheneboea (Eustathius on Hom. Il. vi.158, p 632). His in-law restored him to his own land with an army of Lycians, and he occupied Tiryns, which the Cyclopes had fortified for him.Compare Bacch. 10.77ff., ed. Jebb; Paus. 2.25.8; St
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
Miletus landed in Caria and there founded a city which he called Miletus after himself; and Sarpedon allied himself with Cilix, who was at war with the Lycians, and having stipulated for a share of the country, he became king of Lycia.Compare Hdt. 1.173; Diod. 5.79.3; Strab. 12.8.5; Paus. 7.3.7. Sarpedon was worshipped as a hero in Lycia. See Dittenberger, Orientis Graeci Inscriptiones Selectae 552 vol. ii. p. 231. And Zeus granted him to live for threeLycia. See Dittenberger, Orientis Graeci Inscriptiones Selectae 552 vol. ii. p. 231. And Zeus granted him to live for three generations. But some say that they loved Atymnius, the son of Zeus and Cassiepea, and that it was about him that they quarrelled. Rhadamanthys legislated for the islandersCompare Diod. 5.79.1ff. but afterwards he fled to Boeotia and married AlcmenaSee above, Apollod. 2.4.11 note.; and since his departure from the world he acts as judge in Hades along with Minos. Minos, residing in Crete, passed laws, and married Pasiphae, daughter of the SunDa