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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 40 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 16 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 6 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 6 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 6 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Lycia (Turkey) or search for Lycia (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 10 document sections:

Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 5, line 1 (search)
he was more among the Achaeans or the Trojans. He rushed across the plain like a winter torrent that has burst its barrier in full flood; no dikes, no walls of fruitful vineyards can embank it when it is swollen with rain from heaven, but in a moment it comes tearing onward, and lays many a field waste that many a strong man hand has reclaimed - even so were the dense phalanxes of the Trojans driven in rout by the son of Tydeus, and many though they were, they dared not abide his onslaught. Now when the son of Lykaon saw him scouring the plain and driving the Trojans pell-mell before him, he aimed an arrow and hit the front part of his cuirass near the shoulder: the arrow went right through the metal and pierced the flesh, so that the cuirass was covered with blood. On this the son of Lykaon shouted in triumph, "Horsemen Trojans, come on; the bravest of the Achaeans is wounded, and he will not hold out much longer if King Apollo was indeed with me when I sped from Lycia hither."
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 5, line 106 (search)
heir father sorrowing bitterly, for he nevermore saw them come home from battle alive, and his kinsmen divided his wealth among themselves. Then he came upon two sons of Priam, Echemmon and Chromios, as they were both in one chariot. He sprang upon them as a lion fastens on the neck of some cow or heifer when the herd is feeding in a coppice. For all their vain struggles he flung them both from their chariot and stripped the armor from their bodies. Then he gave their horses to his comrades to take them back to the ships. When Aeneas saw him thus making havoc among the ranks, he went through the fight amid the rain of spears to see if he could find Pandaros. When he had found the brave son of Lykaon he said, "Pandaros, where is now your bow, your winged arrows, and your renown [kleos] as an archer, in respect of which no man here can rival you nor is there any in Lycia that can beat you? Lift then your hands to Zeus and send an arrow at this man who is going so masterfully about,
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 5, line 443 (search)
then, to rescue our brave comrade from the stress of the fight." With these words he put heart and soul into them all. Then Sarpedon rebuked Hektor very sternly. "Hektor," said he, "where is your prowess now? You used to say that though you had neither people nor allies you could hold the town alone with your brothers and brothers-in-law. I see not one of them here; they cower as hounds before a lion; it is we, your allies, who bear the brunt of the battle. I have come from afar, even from Lycia and the banks of the river Xanthos, where I have left my wife, my infant son, and much wealth to tempt whoever is needy; nevertheless, I head my Lycian warriors and stand my ground against any who would fight me though I have nothing here for the Achaeans to plunder, while you look on, without even bidding your men stand firm in defense of their wives. See that you fall not into the hands of your foes as men caught in the meshes of a net, and they sack your fair city forthwith. Keep this bef
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 5, line 572 (search)
uld you come skulking here you who are a man of peace? They lie who call you son of aegis-bearing Zeus, for you are little like those who were of old his children. Far other was Herakles, my own brave and lion-hearted father, who came here for the horses of Laomedon, and though he had six ships only, and few men to follow him, sacked the city of Ilion and made a wilderness of her highways. You are a coward, and your people are falling from you. For all your strength, and all your coming from Lycia, you will be no help to the Trojans but will pass the gates of Hades vanquished by my hand." And Sarpedon, leader of the Lycians, answered, "Tlepolemos, your father overthrew Ilion by reason of Laomedon's folly in refusing payment to one who had served him well. He would not give your father the horses which he had come so far to fetch. As for yourself, you shall meet death by my spear. You shall yield glory to myself, and your soul [psukhê] to Hades of the noble steeds." Thus spoke Sarped
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 6, line 102 (search)
.’ The king was angered, but shrank from killing Bellerophon, so he sent him to Lycia bearing baneful signs [sêmata], written inside a folded tablet and containing mher-in-law, to the end that he might thus perish; Bellerophon therefore went to Lycia, and the gods convoyed him safely. "When he reached the river Xanthos, which is in Lycia, the king received him with all goodwill, feasted him nine days, and killed nine heifers in his honor, but when rosy-fingered morning appeared upon the teanother plan for his destruction; he picked [krinô] the bravest warriors in all Lycia, and placed them in ambuscade, but not a man ever came back, for Bellerophon kithe king knew that he must be the valiant offspring of a god, so he kept him in Lycia, gave him his daughter in marriage, and made him of equal honor [timê] in the kthe foremost and outvie my peers, so as not to shame the blood of my fathers who were the noblest in Ephyra and in all Lycia. This, then, is the descent I claim
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 6, line 212 (search)
h friendly words. "Then," he said, you are an old friend of my father's house. Great Oeneus once entertained Bellerophon for twenty days, and the two exchanged presents. Oeneus gave a belt rich with purple, and Bellerophon a double cup, which I left at home when I set out for Troy. I do not remember Tydeus, for he was taken from us while I was yet a child, when the army of the Achaeans was cut to pieces before Thebes. Henceforth, however, I must be your host in middle Argos, and you mine in Lycia, if I should ever go to that district [dêmos]; let us avoid one another's spears even during a general engagement; there are many noble Trojans and allies whom I can kill, if I overtake them and heaven delivers them into my hand; so again with yourself, there are many Achaeans whose lives you may take if you can; we two, then, will exchange armor, that all present may know of the old ties that subsist between us." With these words they sprang from their chariots, grasped one another's hand
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 12, line 290 (search)
had a try for it; he will either spring on a sheep and carry it off, or be hit by a spear from strong hand - even so was Sarpedon fain to attack the wall and break down its battlements. Then he said to Glaukos son of Hippolokhos, "Glaukos, why in Lycia do we receive especial honor as regards our place at table? Why are the choicest portions served us and our cups kept brimming, and why do men look up to us as though we were gods? Moreover we hold a large estate by the banks of the river Xanthos, fair with orchard lawns and wheat-growing land; it becomes us, therefore, to take our stand at the head of all the Lycians and bear the brunt of the fight, that one may say to another, Our princes in Lycia eat the fat of the land and drink best of wine, but they are fine men; they fight well and are ever at the front in battle.’ My good friend, if, when we were once out of this fight, we could escape old age and death thenceforward and for ever, I should neither press forward myself nor bid y
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 16, line 431 (search)
in two minds whether to catch him up out of the fight and set him down safe and sound in the fertile district [dêmos] of Lycia, or to let him now fall by the hand of the son of Menoitios." And Hera answered, "Most dread son of Kronos, what is thiê] is gone out of him, send Death and sweet Sleep to bear him off the field and take him to the broad district [dêmos] of Lycia, where his brothers and his kinsmen will bury him with mound and pillar, in due honor to the dead." The sire of gods anerefore he prayed to far-darting Apollo saying, "Hear me O king from your seat, may be in the fertile district [dêmos] of Lycia, or may be in Troy, for in all places you can hear the prayer of one who is in distress, as I now am. I have a grievous wo nothing to support them. Sarpedon leader of the Lycian warriors has fallen - he who was at once the right and might of Lycia; Ares has laid him low by the spear of Patroklos. Stand by him, my friends, and suffer not the Myrmidons to strip him of
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 16, line 658 (search)
where you may wash him in the river, anoint him with ambrosia, and clothe him in immortal raiment; this done, commit him to the arms of the two fleet messengers, Death, and Sleep, who will carry him straightway to the fertile district [dêmos] of Lycia, where his brothers and kinsmen will give him a funeral, and will raise both mound and pillar to his memory, in due honor to the dead." Thus he spoke. Apollo obeyed his father's saying, and came down from the heights of Ida into the thick of th where he washed him in the river, anointed him with ambrosia and clothed him in immortal raiment; this done, he committed him to the arms of the two fleet messengers, Death and Sleep, who presently set him down in the fertile district [dêmos] of Lycia. Meanwhile Patroklos, with many a shout to his horses and to Automedon, pursued the Trojans and Lycians in the pride and foolishness of his heart. Had he but obeyed the bidding of the son of Peleus, he would have, escaped death and have been sc
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 17, line 140 (search)
e armor of Sarpedon, and we should get his body to boot. For he whose squire [therapôn] has been now killed is the foremost man at the ships of the Achaeans - he and his close-fighting followers [therapontes]. Nevertheless you dared not make a stand against Ajax, nor face him, eye to eye, with battle all round you, for he is a braver man than you are." Hektor scowled at him and answered, "Glaukos, you should know better. I have held you so far as a man of more understanding than any in all Lycia, but now I despise you for saying that I am afraid of Ajax. I fear neither battle nor the din of chariots, but Zeus' will [noos] is stronger than ours; Zeus at one time makes even a strong man draw back and snatches victory from his grasp, while at another he will set him on to fight. Come hither then, my friend, stand by me and see indeed whether I shall play the coward the whole day through as you say, or whether I shall not stay some even of the boldest Danaans from fighting round the bod