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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 80 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 1 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 13 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 10 10 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Algiers (Algeria) or search for Algiers (Algeria) in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 23 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
Algiers, One of the former Barbary States on the northern coast of Africa, stretching west from Egypt to the Atlantic Ocidered a part of France rather than a colony. The city of Algiers, under French domination, is the capital of the departmenthe ancient inhabitants. From their ports, especially from Algiers, went out piratical vessels to depredate upon the commercead been held in slavery for ransom. The Dey, or ruler, of Algiers demanded $60,000 for their redemption. As this sum would s enjoyed they were indebted to Portugal, then at war with Algiers. In 1793 the British government made a secret arrangement with that of Portugal, whereby peace with Algiers was obtained. In that arrangement it was stipulated that for the space ofoose upon commerce. David Humphreys, who had been sent to Algiers by the government of the United States to make arrangementnt was compelled to agree, by treaty, to pay to the Dey of Algiers an annual tribute for the relief of captured seamen. acco
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, William Henry, 1784- (search)
Allen, William Henry, 1784- Naval officer; born in Providence, R. I., Oct. 21, 1784; entered the navy as a midshipman in April, 1800, and sailed in the frigate George Washington to Algiers. He afterwards William Henry Allen. went to the Mediterranean in the Philadelphia, under Barron; then in the John Adams, under Rodgers; and in 1804 as sailing-master to the Congress. He was in the Frigate Constitution in 1805; and in 1807 he was third lieutenant of the Chesapeake when she was attacked by the Leopard. It was Lieutenant Allen who drew up the memorial of the officers of the Chesapeake to the Secretary of the Navy, urging the arrest and trial of Barron for neglect of duty. In 1809 he was made first lieutenant of the frigate United States, under Decatur. He behaved bravely in the conflict with the Macedonian; and after her capture took her safely into New York Harbor, Jan. 1, 1813. In July, 1813, he was promoted to master-commandant while he was on his voyage in the brig Ang
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Fisher, 1758-1808 (search)
there are none when it is decried. It is the philosophy of politics, the religion of governments. It is observed by barbarians — a whiff of tobacco smoke or a string of beads gives not merely a binding force but sanctity to treaties. Even in Algiers a truce may be bought for money, but, when ratified, even Algiers is too wise or too just to disown and annul its obligation. Thus we see neither the ignorance of savages nor the principles of an association for piracy and rapine permit a natioAlgiers is too wise or too just to disown and annul its obligation. Thus we see neither the ignorance of savages nor the principles of an association for piracy and rapine permit a nation to despise its engagements. If. sir, there could be a resurrection from the foot of the gallows, if the victims of justice could live again, collect together and form a society, they would, however loath, soon find themselves obliged to make justice, that justice under which they fell, the fundamental law of their state. They would perceive it was their interest to make others respect — and they would, therefore, soon pay some respect themselves to — the obligations of good faith. It is <
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bainbridge, William, 1774-1833 (search)
y 7, 1774. At the age of sixteen years he went to sea, and at nineteen commanded a ship. On the reorganization of the navy in 1798 he was appointed a lieutenant. He and his vessel and crew were captured in the West Indies by a French cruiser in September of that year, but were released in December, when, returning home, he was promoted to the command of a brig. In May, 1800, he was commissioned a captain, and in the ship Washington be carried tribute from the United States to the Dey of Algiers, by whom he was treated with much insolence. By threats of capture and a declaration of war by the Algerine ruler, he was compelled to take an embassy to Constantinople for that petty despot. On his return, with power given him by the William Bainbridge. Sultan, Bainbridge frightened the insolent Dey, compelling him to release all Christian prisoners then in his possession. He returned to the United States in 1801, and he was again sent to the Mediterranean with the frigate Essex. Up
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Joel, 1754- (search)
the Scioto Land Company, he published, in aid of the French Revolution, Advice to the privileged orders. To this he added, in 1791, a Letter to the National convention, and the Conspiracy of Kings. As deputy of the London Constitutional Society, he presented an address to the French National Convention, and took up his abode in Paris, where he became a French citizen. Barlow was given employment in Savoy, where he wrote his mock-heroic poem, Hasty pudding. He was United States consul at Algiers in 1795-97, where he negotiated treaties with the ruler of that state, and also with the Bey of Tunis. He took sides with the French Directory in their controversy with the American envoys. (See Directory, the French.) Having made a large fortune by speculations in France, Mr. Barlow returned to the United States in 1805, and built himself an elegant mansion in the vicinity of Washington, and called his seat there Kalorama. In 1807 he published the Columbiad, an epic poem. It was illust
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 (search)
and says, So far shalt thou go, and no farther. Who are you, that should fret and rage, and bite the chains of nature? Nothing worse happens to you than does to all nations who have extensive empire: and it happens in all the forms into which empire can be thrown. In large bodies, the circulation of power must be less vigorous at the extremities. Nature has said it. The Turk cannot govern Egypt, and Arabia, and Curdistan, as he governs Thrace; nor has he the same dominion in Crimea and Algiers which he has at Brusa and Smyrna. Despotism itself is obliged to truck and huckster. The Sultan gets such obedience as he can. He governs with a loose rein that he may govern at all; and the whole of the force and vigour of his authority in his centre is derived from a prudent relaxation in all his borders. Spain, in her provinces, is, perhaps, not so well obeyed as you are in yours. She complies too; she submits; she watches times. This is the immutable condition, the eternal law, of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 1818-1893 (search)
f complaint. I do not feel that I have erred in too much harshness, for that harshness has ever been exhibited to disloyal enemies of my country, and not to loyal friends. To be sure, I might have regaled you with the amenities of British civilization, and yet been within the supposed rules of civilized warfare. You might have been smoked to death in caverns, as were the covenanters of Scotland, by the command of a general of the royal house of England; or roasted like the inhabitants of Algiers during the French campaigns; your wives and daughters might have been given over to the ravisher, as were the unfortunate dames of Spain in the Peninsular War; or you might have been scalped and tomahawked as our mothers were at Wyoming, by savage allies of Great Britain, in our own Revolution; your property could have been turned over to indiscriminate loot, like the palace of the Emperor of China; works of art which adorned your buildings might have been sent away, like the paintings of t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chauncey, Isaac (search)
Chauncey, Isaac Naval officer; born Isaac Chauncey. in Black Rock, Conn., Feb: 20, 1772; in early life was in the merchant service, Chauncey's monument. and commanded a ship at the age of nineteen years. He made several voyages to the East Indies in the ships of John Jacob Astor. In 1798 he was made a lieutenant of the navy, and was acting captain of the Chesapeake in 1802. He became master in May, 1804, and captain in 1806. During the War of 1812-15 he was in command of the American naval force on Lake Ontario, where he performed efficient service. After that war he commanded the Mediterranean squadron, and, with Consul Shaler, negotiated a treaty with Algiers. In 1820 he was naval commissioner in Washington, D. C., and again from 1833 until his death, in that city, Jan. 27, 1840. Commodore Chauncey's remains were interred in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, and at the head of his grave stands a fine white-marble monument, suitably inscribed.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Decatur, Stephen, 1779- (search)
ry in the City Hall, where it still hangs. In January, 1815, after a running fight, the President, his flagship, was captured by a British squadron; Kalorama Algiers in 1812. and a few months later he was sent to the Mediterranean, and compelled the government of Algiers to relinquish its barbarous conduct towards other powerAlgiers to relinquish its barbarous conduct towards other powers and to pay for American property destroyed (see Algiers). He was appointed a navy commissioner in November, 1815, and made his residence in the fine mansion of Kalorama, about a mile from Georgetown, built by Joel Barlow. Decatur had opposed the reinstatement of Barron to his former position in the navy, and a duel was the conseAlgiers). He was appointed a navy commissioner in November, 1815, and made his residence in the fine mansion of Kalorama, about a mile from Georgetown, built by Joel Barlow. Decatur had opposed the reinstatement of Barron to his former position in the navy, and a duel was the consequence. They fought at the famous duelling-ground near Bladensburg, when Decatur was mortally wounded, and was taken to Washington. Gen. Solomon Van Rensselaer wrote to his wife from that city, on March 20, 1820, as follows: I have only time, after writing to several, to say that an affair of honor took place this morning betwe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Exmouth, Edward Pellew, Viscount, 1757-1833 (search)
aval officer; born in Dover, England, April 19, 1757; entered the navy at the age of thirteen years; first distinguished himself in the battle on Lake Champlain, in 1776; and rendered great assistance to Burgoyne in his invasion of New York. He became a post-captain in 1782. For the first capture of a vessel of the French navy (1792), in the war with France, Pellew was knighted and employed in blockading the French coast. For bravery in saving the people of a wrecked ship at Plymouth, in 1796, he was made a baronet. Pellew was in Parliament in 1802, but in 1804 was again in the naval service; was promoted to rear-admiral, and made commander-in-chief in the East Indies, when he annihilated the Dutch naval force there. He was created Baron Exmouth in 1814; made a full admiral of the blue, and allowed a pension of $10,000 a year. With a fleet of nineteen ships, he brought the Dey of Algiers to terms in 1816, and liberated about 1,200 prisoners. He died in Teignmouth, Jan. 23. 1833.
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