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Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 26 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 16 0 Browse Search
Plato, Republic 16 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 12 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 41-50 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 6 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Asinaria, or The Ass-Dealer (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 4 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley). You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

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Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 1, We ought to connive at the faults of our friends, and all offenses are not to be ranked in the catalogue of crimes. (search)
nibus tritum . — Tornatum, caelatum, fabricatum. Hinc radios trivere rotis, Virgil. Vitrum aliud flatu figuratur, aliud torno teritur, Pliny. But as the Latins used the word toreumata to signify any works, either turned or wrought by the chisel, because they were made by the same workmen, Sanadon thinks the poet probably means, that this plate was engraved with an instrument. The Scholiast tells us, that this Evander was carried from Athens to Rome by Mark Antony, and that he excelled in sculpture and engraving. They who believe that Horace means king Evander, would not only persuade us that this plate must have been preserved so many ages by some uncommon good fortune, but have unluckily placed a vessel so valuable on a monarch's table, whose palace was a cottage, his throne a chair of ordinary wood, his beds made of leaves or rushes, and his tapestry the skins of beasts. Res i
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 2, Damasippus, in a conversation with Horace, proves this paradox of the Stoic philosophy, that most men are actually mad. (search)
which may dishonor his character. how you do any thing unworthy of yourself; a false shame, says he, afflicts you, who dread to be esteemed a madman among madmen. For in the first place I will inquire, what it is to be mad: and, if this distemper be in you exclusively, I will not add a single word, to prevent you from dying bravely. The school and sect of Chrysippus Chrysippi porticus. The Porticus was a famous gallery at Athens, where Zeno held his school, which, from the Greek word sto/a, Porticus, took the name of Stoic. deem every man mad, whom vicious folly or the ignorance of truth drives blindly forward. This definition takes in whole nations, this even great kings, the wise man [alone] excepted. Now learn, why all those, who have fixed the name of madman upon you, are as senseless as yourself. As in the woods, where a mistake makes people wander about from the proper pa