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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 106 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 74 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 74 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 42 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 34 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 28 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 26 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Thessaly (Greece) or search for Thessaly (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 7 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
ere destroyed, except a few who fled to the high mountains in the neighborhood. It was then that the mountains in Thessaly parted, and that all the world outside the Isthmus and Peloponnese was overwhelmed. But Deucalion, floating in th after himself.As to the early seats of the Dorians, see Hdt. 1.56. Aeolus reigned over the regions about Thessaly and named the inhabitants Aeolians.As to the Aeolians of Thessaly, compare Paus. 10.8.4; Diod. 4.67.2. HeThessaly, compare Paus. 10.8.4; Diod. 4.67.2. He married Enarete, daughter of Deimachus, and begat seven sons, Cretheus, Sisyphus, Athamas, Salmoneus, Deion, Magnes, Perieres, and five daughters, Canace, Alcyone, Pisidice, Calyce, Perimede.As to Aeolus, his descendants, and their setdarts at each other.Compare Hyginus, Fab. 28. Calyce and Aethlius had a son Endymion who led Aeolians from Thessaly and founded Elis. But some say that he was a son of Zeus. As he was of surpassing beauty, the Moon fell in love
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
.10. According to the last of these writers, Athamantia was a plain in Thessaly. and he married Themisto, daughter of Hypseus, and begat Leucon, Erythrnd Dictys; these colonized Seriphus. Salmoneus at first dwelt in Thessaly, but afterwards he came to Elis and there founded a city.Comparen, Pisistratus, Antilochus, and Thrasymedes. But Pelias dwelt in Thessaly and married Anaxibia, daughter of Bias, but according to some his wife ns, Aegialeus and Cyanippus. Pheres, son of Cretheus, founded Pherae in Thessaly and begat Admetus and Lycurgus. Lycurgus took up his abode at Nemea, anphale. But Pherecydes says that he was left behind at Aphetae in Thessaly, the Argo having declared with human voice that she could not bear his xiii.73ff.). Herodotus says (Hdt. 1.193) that at Aphetae in Thessaly the hero landed from the Argo to fetch water and was left behind by Ja<
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
n Cycnus, and the fall of the thunderbolt which parted the combatants; yet he says that Herakles killed Cycnus. This combat, which, according to Apollodorus, ended indecisively, was supposed to have been fought in Macedonia, for the Echedorus was a Macedonian river (Hdt. 7.124, Hdt. 7.127). Accordingly we must distinguish this contest from another and more famous fight which Herakles fought with another son of Ares, also called Cycnus, near Pagasae in Thessaly. See Apollod. 2.7.7, with the note. Apparently Hyginus confused the two combats. And going on foot through Illyria and hastening to the river Eridanus he came to the nymphs, the daughters of Zeus and Themis. They revealed Nereus to him, and Hercules seized him while he slept, and though the god turned himself into all kinds of shapes, the hero bound him and did not release him till he had learned from him where were the apples and the Hesperides.Th
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
whose original home was in the fastnesses of Mount Parnassus. Driven from there by the advance of the Dorians, they dispersed and settled, some in Thessaly, some in Euboea, some in Peloponnese, and some even in Cyprus. Down to the second century of our era the descendants of the Dryopians maintained with these gory trophies to build a temple to his father Ares. This we learn from the Scholiasts on Pind. O. 2.82. The scene of his exploits was Thessaly. According to Paus. 1.27.6, Herakles slew the ruffian on the banks of the Peneus river; but Hesiod places the scene at Pagasae, and says that the131ff. (Second Vatican Mythographer 159, 165). The situation of Oechalia, the city of Eurytus, was much debated. Homer seems to place it in Thessaly (Hom. Il. 2.730). But according to others it was in Euboea, or Arcadia, or Messenia. See Strab. 9.5.17; Paus. 4.2.2ff.; Scholiast on Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
e Trackers, of which some considerable fragments have been discovered in recent years. The scene of the play is laid on Mount Cyllene. Apollo appears and complains of the loss of the cattle, describes how he has come from Thessaly and through Boeotia in search of them, and offers a reward to anyone who will help him to find the missing beasts. The proclamation reaches the ears of Silenus, who hurries to the scene of action and warmly proffers the services pus begat Arsinoe: with her Apollo had intercourse, and she bore Aesculapius. But some affirm that Aesculapius was not a son of Arsinoe, daughter of Leucippus, but that he was a son of Coronis, daughter of Phlegyas in Thessaly.The ancients were divided with regard to the mother of Aesculapius, some maintaining that she was a Messenian woman Arsinoe, daughter of Leucippus, others that she was a Thessalian woman Coronis, daughter of Phlegyas. See
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
s she was Antigone, daughter of Eurytion (Scholiast on Hom. Il. 16.173-178). Hence it is probable that here, as in so many places, Apollodorus followed Pherecydes. According to Staphylus, in the third book of his work on Thessaly, the wife of Peleus and mother of Polydora was Eurydice, daughter of Actor (Scholiast on Hom. Il. 16.173-178). A little later on (Apollod. 3.13.4) Apollodorus says that Peleus himself married Polydora, daughter of Periers, their mutability reflecting as it were the instability of the fickle, inconstant element of which they were born. The place where Peleus caught and mastered his sea-bride was believed to be the southeastern headland of Thessaly, which hence bore the name of Sepia or the Cuttlefish. The whole coast of the Cape was sacred to Thetis and the other Nereids; and after their fleet had been wrecked on the headland, the Persians sacrificed to Thetis
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
Od. 3.189, p. 1463. He says that Neoptolemus sailed across the sea to Thessaly and there burned his ships by the advice of Thetis; after which, beingrtained by a certain Molon and died. As to an early connexion between Thessaly and Cos, see W. R. Paton and E. L. Hicks, The Inscriptions of Cos, pe over the processions and sacrifices in their honour. The Aenianes of Thessaly used to send a grand procession and costly sacrifices to Delphi the Pelasgians, and, having taken possession of the country, called it Thessaly. Philoctetes went to the Campanians in Italy; Phidippus with the Coans settle Pelasgians, and having taken possession of the country he called it Thessaly.Compare Strab. 9.5.23. Phidippus with the Coans was drivet in a sedition Philoctetes was driven from his city of Meliboea in Thessaly (Hom. Il. 2.717ff.), and fled to southern Italy, where he founded