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World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Susiana (Iran) or search for Susiana (Iran) in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 5, Xenoetas Has Early Success (search)
sion of all the upper country: he therefore abandoned his foreign expedition and started to relieve his own dominions. The fact was that when the general Xenoetas had been despatched with absolute powers, as I have beforeXenoetas at first successful. stated, his unexpected elevation caused him to treat his friends with haughtiness and his enemies with overweening temerity. His first move however was sufficiently prudent. He marched to Seleucia, and after sending for Diogenes the governor of Susiana, and Pythiades the commander in the Persian Gulf, he led out his forces and encamped with the river Tigris protecting his front. But there he was visited by many men from Molon's camp, who swam across the river and assured him that, if he would only cross the Tigris, the whole of Molon's army would declare for him; for the common soldiers were jealous of Molon and warmly disposed towards the king. Xenoetas was encouraged by these statements to attempt the passage of the Tigris. He made a fe
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Antiochus Advances Against Molon (search)
mmediately arranged in three divisions, and got across with the baggage at three points in the river. Thence they marched in the direction of Dura, where they quickly caused the siege of the citadel to be raised, which was being invested at the time by some of Molon's officers; and thence, after a march of eight successive days, they crossed the mountain called Oreicum and arrived at Apollonia. Meanwhile Molon had heard of the king's arrival, and not feeling confidence in the inhabitants of Susiana and Babylonia, because he had conquered them so recently and by surprise, fearing also to be cut off from a retreat to Media, he determined to throw a bridge over the Tigris and get his army across; being eager if it were possible to secure the mountain district of Apollonia, because he had great confidence in his corps of slingers called Cyrtii. He carried out his resolution, and was pushing forward in an unbroken series of forced marches. Molon also crosses the Tigris. Thus it came about
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Defeat and Death of Molon (search)
cia and made arrangements for the government of the Satrapies round it, treating all with equal clemency and prudence. But Hermeias acted with his usual harshness: he got up charges against the people of Seleucia, and imposed a fine of a thousand talents upon the city; drove their magistrates, called Adeiganes, into exile; and put many Seleucians to death with various tortures, by mutilation, the sword and the rack. With great difficulty, sometimes by dissuading Hermeias, and sometimes by interposing his own authority, the king did at length put an end to these severities; and, exacting only a fine of a hundred and fifty talents from the citizens for the error they had committed, restored the city to a state of order. This being done, he left Diogenes in command of Media, and Apollodorus of Susiana; and sent Tychon, his chief military secretary, to command the district along the Persian Gulf. Thus was the rebellion of Molon and the rising in the upper Satrapies suppressed and quieted.