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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 36 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 12 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 10 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 6 0 Browse Search
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 4 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Life of Flavius Josephus (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Damascus (Syria) or search for Damascus (Syria) in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The names of such countries as I Anthony Jenkinson have travelled unto, from the second of October 1546, at which time I made my first voyage out of England, untill the yeere of our Lord 1572, when I returned last out of Russia . (search)
also travelled through the kingdomes of Spaine and Portingal, I have sailed through the Levant seas every way, & have bene in all the chiefe Islands within the same sea, as Rhodes, Malta , Sicilia , Cyprus , Candie, and divers others. I have bene in many partes of Grecia , Morea , Achaia, and where the olde citie of Corinth stoode. I have travelled through a great part of Turkie, Syria , and divers other countries in Asia minor. I have passed over the mountaines of Libanus to Damasco , and travelled through Samaria , Galile, Philistine or Palestine , unto Jerusalem, and so through all the Holy Land. I have bene in divers places of Affrica, as Algiers , Cola, Bona , Tripolis, the gollet within the gulfe of Tunis . I have sailed farre Northward within the Mare glaciale, where we have had continuall day, and sight of the Sunne ten weekes together, and that navigation was in Norway , Lapland , Samogitia, and other very strange places. I have travelled through all
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Fleete of Englishmen, Danes, and Flemmings, arrived at Joppa in the Holy land, the seventh yeere of Baldwine the second king of Hierusalem. Written in the beginning of the tenth booke of the Chronicle of Hierusalem, in the 8. yeere of Henry the first of England. (search)
ey of the Grosse Carle called Suet, very rich in gold and silver most abundant in cattle frontering upon the countrie of the Damascenes, where hee tooke a pray of inestimable riches and cattle, which might have suffised him for the besiege of Sagitta, whereof he ment to impart liberally to the king, and his companie. This pray being gathered out of sundry places thereabout, and being led away as farre as the citie of Belinas, which they call Caesaria Philippi, the Turkes which dwelt at Damascus , together with the Saracens inhabitants of the countrie perceiving this, flocking on all partes together by troopes, pursued Hughes companie to rescue the pray, and passed foorth as farre as the mountaines, over which Hughes footemen did drive the pray. There beganne a great skirmish of both partes, the one side made resistance to keepe the pray, the other indevoured with all their might to recover it, untill at length the Turkes and Saracens prevailing, the pray was rescued and brought ba
ey of the Grosse Carle called Suet, very rich in gold and silver most abundant in cattle frontering upon the countrie of the Damascenes, where hee tooke a pray of inestimable riches and cattle, which might have suffised him for the besiege of Sagitta, whereof he ment to impart liberally to the king, and his companie. This pray being gathered out of sundry places thereabout, and being led away as farre as the citie of Belinas, which they call Caesaria Philippi, the Turkes which dwelt at Damascus , together with the Saracens inhabitants of the countrie perceiving this, flocking on all partes together by troopes, pursued Hughes companie to rescue the pray, and passed foorth as farre as the mountaines, over which Hughes footemen did drive the pray. There beganne a great skirmish of both partes, the one side made resistance to keepe the pray, the other indevoured with all their might to recover it, untill at length the Turkes and Saracens prevailing, the pray was rescued and brought ba
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The charter of the privileges granted to the English, & the league of the great Turke with the Queenes Majestie in respect of traffique, dated in June 1580. (search)
ained for another mans fact, except he be his suretie. 13 Item, if any slave shall be found to be an Englishman, and their Consull or governour shall sue for his libertie, let the same slave be diligently examined, and if hee be found in deed to be English, let him be discharged and restored to the Englishmen. 14 Item, if any Englishman shall come hither either to dwel or trafique, whether hee be married or unmarried, he shall pay no polle or head money. 15 Item, if either in Alexandria, Damasco , Samos , Tunis , Tripolis in ye west, the port townes of Ægypt, or in any other places, they purpose to choose to themselves Consuls or governours, let them doe so, and if they will alter them at any time, and in the roome of the former Consuls place others, let them do so also, and no man shall restraine them. 16 Item, if their interpreter shalbe at any time absent, being occupied in other serious matters, let the thing then in question bee stayed and differed till his comming, and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Commission given by M. William Hareborne the English Ambassadour, to Richard Forster, authorising him Consul of the English nation in the parts of Alepo, Damasco , Aman, Tripolis, Jerusalem, &c. (search)
Commission given by M. William Hareborne the English Ambassadour, to Richard Forster, authorising him Consul of the English nation in the parts of Alepo, Damasco , Aman, Tripolis, Jerusalem, &c. I WILLIAM HARBORNE, her Majesties Ambassadour, Ligier with the Grand Signior, for the affaires of the Levant doe in her Majesties name confirme and appoint Richard Forster Gentleman, my Deputie and Consull in the parts of Alepo, Damasco , Aman, Tripolis, Jerusalem, and all other ports whatsoever in Damasco , Aman, Tripolis, Jerusalem, and all other ports whatsoever in the provinces of Syria , Palestina , and Jurie, to execute the office of Consull over all our Nation her Majesties subjects, of what estate or quality soever: giving him hereby full power to defend, protect, and maintaine all such her Majesties subjects as to him shall be obedient, in all honest and just causes whatsoever: and in like case no lesse power to imprison, punish, and correct any and all such as he shall finde disobedient to him in the like causes, even in such order as I my selfe mig
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . (search)
tano, that is to say, The hospitall, which hath of rent five hundred ducats of golde every day left unto it by a king of Damasco from auncient times; which king having conquered Cairo , for the space of five dayes continually put the people thereof is called Imamsciafii, where is buried Sciafii the second Doctor of this law. Of the other two Doctors one is buried in Damasco , the other in Aleppo. The fift & last famous monument is Giamalazar, that is, the house of Lazarus: and this is the genef the three Carovans. THE same day that the Carovan of Cairo commeth to this place, hither come 2. Carovans also, one of Damasco , the other of Arabia , and in like maner all the inhabitants for ten dayes journey round about, so that at one time ther best shift they can on foote, giving ever unto the captaine of Cairo the chiefe place, the second to the captaine of Damasco , and the third to the captaine of Arabia , & being all approched as is abovesayd, there commeth a square squire, one of
faire Mesquitas rich, great, and of goodly and gorgeous building, among which are five principall. The first is called Morastano, that is to say, The hospitall, which hath of rent five hundred ducats of golde every day left unto it by a king of Damasco from auncient times; which king having conquered Cairo , for the space of five dayes continually put the people thereof to the sword, and in the end repenting him of so great manslaughter, caused this cruelty to cease, and to obtaine remission fat shee did many miracles. The third is called Zavia della Innachari, who was one of the foure Doctors in the law. The fourth is called Imamsciafii, where is buried Sciafii the second Doctor of this law. Of the other two Doctors one is buried in Damasco , the other in Aleppo. The fift & last famous monument is Giamalazar, that is, the house of Lazarus: and this is the generall University of the whole kingdome of Egypt . In this place Anno 1566 in the moneth of January by misfortune of fire were
Of the three Carovans. THE same day that the Carovan of Cairo commeth to this place, hither come 2. Carovans also, one of Damasco , the other of Arabia , and in like maner all the inhabitants for ten dayes journey round about, so that at one time there is to be seen above 200000. persons, and more then 300000. cattell. Now all this company meeting together in this place the night before the feast, the three hostes cast themselves into a triangle, setting the mountaine in which have horses mount thereon, and approch as nigh unto the mountaine as they can, and those which have no horses make the best shift they can on foote, giving ever unto the captaine of Cairo the chiefe place, the second to the captaine of Damasco , and the third to the captaine of Arabia , & being all approched as is abovesayd, there commeth a square squire, one of the Santones, mounted on a camell well furnished, who at the other side of the mountain ascendeth five steps into a pulpit ma
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of a Voiage to Constantinople and Syria , begun the 21. of March 1593. and ended the 9. of August, 1595. wherein is shewed the order of delivering the second Present by Master Edward Barton her majesties Ambassador, which was sent from her Majestie to Sultan Murad Can, Emperour of Turkie. (search)
taine with his Janisaries, and his Giebegies, 20000. The Beglerbeg of Graecia, with all his Sanjacks, 400000 The company of Spaheis or horsemen, 10000. The company of Silitari, 6000. The company of Sagbulve and of Solbulve both together, 8000. The Bassa of Belgrad , 80000. The Bassa of Temiswar. The Bassa of Bosna . The Bassa of Buda . The Sanjack of Gersech. Out of Asia. The Bassa of Caramania.120000. The Bassa of Laras. The Bassa of Damasco . The Bassa of Suas. The Bassa of Van or Nan. The Bassa of Usdrum. Of Tartars there be about 100000. Thus you may see that the great Turke maketh warre with no small numbers. And in anno 1597, when Sultan Mahomet himselfe went in person into Hungary , if a man may beleeve reports, he had an army of 600000. For the city of Constantinople you shall understand that it is matchable with any city in Europe, aswell in bignesse as for the pleasant situation thereof, and com modious traffi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
that if thou bee benighted when thou fallest with Santo Domingo, then thou must keepe the hils called Sierras de las minas viejas to the Northwest. And if thou wouldest goe into Santo Domingo, and meetest there with a forcible Northerly wind, then the best way is to runne East till it be day. And having daylight thou shalt cast about, and so thou must ply to wind-ward untill the Northerly wind be done: and when it is past, make all the saile thou canst to hale with the sight of Calle de las Damas : and when thou hast sight thereof thou shalt lye with thy stemme with a sandie Bay, which lyeth on the other side: and thou must take in thy maine saile, and go so till thou bring thy selfe open with the midst of the river; and so having opened the river, thou must go with great care in the middest of the same, with all thy sailes up, except thy maine saile, and thou must have thy boat out, if it be needefull to sound or to tow thy ship, if she cast too much to the loofe, for the currents
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