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Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 2 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 2 0 Browse Search
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Demosthenes, Against Aristocrates, section 119 (search)
Nevertheless, when he was a wicked, unprincipled man, and was doing you serious injury, you treated the men who put him to death, Pytho and Heracleides of Aenos, as benefactors, made them citizens, and decorated them with crowns of gold. Now suppose that, at the time when the disposition of Cotys was thought to be friendly, it had been proposed that any one who killed Cotys should be given up for punishment, would you have given up Pytho and his brother? Or would you, in defiance of the decree, have given them your citizenship, and honored them as benefactors?
Demosthenes, Against Theocrines, section 37 (search)
decrees stand as they are, men of the jury, or are annulled (for it makes no difference to me), what does the state either gain or lose? Nothing, in my opinion. They say that the men of AenosAenos, a town on the south coast of Thrace. pay no heed to our state, and that this has come about because of this fellow Theocrines. For being harassed by the false and maliciousAenos, a town on the south coast of Thrace. pay no heed to our state, and that this has come about because of this fellow Theocrines. For being harassed by the false and malicious charges of this man at the time when some of them were turning to Philip and others to Athens, and learning that the decree which Charinus had previously indicted had again been indicted as illegal,—the decree, that is, which Thucydides proposed and which had to do with their contributionIt appears that the Athenian general Chares had fixed the tribute to be paid by the <
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 90 (search)
The Tearus is said by those living on it to be the best river of all for purposes of healing, especially for healing mange in men and horses. Its springs are thirty-eight in number, some cold and some hot, all flowing from the same rock. There are two roads to the place, one from the town of Heraeum near Perinthus, one from Apollonia on the Euxine sea; each is a two days' journey. This Tearus is a tributary of the Contadesdus river, and that of the Agrianes, and that of the Hebrus, which empties into the sea near the city of Aenus.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 58 (search)
His navy sailed out of the Hellespont and travelled along the land, going across from the land army. The ships sailed westwards, laying their course for the headland of Sarpedon, where Xerxes had ordered them to go and wait for him; the army of the mainland travelled towards the eastNorth-east, strictly speaking: they marched through the promontory of Gallipoli. and the sunrise through the Chersonese, with the tomb of Athamas' daughter Helle on its right and the town of Cardia on its left, marching through the middle of a city called Agora. From there they rounded the head of the Black Bay (as it is called) and crossed the Black River, which could not hold its own then against the army, but gave out—crossing this river, which gives its name to the bay, they went westwards, past the Aeolian city of Aenus and the marsh of Stentor, until they came to Doriscus.
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 83 (search)
For indeed Seth was born when Adam was in his two hundred and thirtieth year, who lived :nine hundred and thirty years. Seth begat Enos in his two hundred and fifth year; who, when he had lived nine hundred and twelve years, delivered the government to Cainan his son, whom he had in his hundred and ninetieth year. He lived nine hundred and five years. Cainan, when he had lived nine hundred and ten years, had his son Malaleel, who was born in his hundred and seventieth year. This Malaleel, having lived eight hundred and ninety-five years, died, leaving his son Jared, whom he begat when he was in his hundred and sixty-fifth year. He lived nine hundred and sixty-two years; and then his son Enoch succeeded him, who was born when his father was one hundred and sixty-two years old. Now he, when he had lived three hundred and sixty-five years, departed and went to God; whence it is that they have not written down his death. Now Mathusela, the son of Enoch, who was born to him when he was one
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 3, line 13 (search)
Against our coast appears a spacious land, Which once the fierce Lycurgus did command, (Thracia the name—the people bold in war; Vast are their fields, and tillage is their care,) A hospitable realm while Fate was kind, With Troy in friendship and religion join'd. I land; with luckless omens then adore Their gods, and draw a line along the shore; I lay the deep foundations of a wall, And Aenos, nam'd from me, the city ca