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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6,437 1 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 1,858 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 766 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 310 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 302 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 300 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 266 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 224 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 222 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 214 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for England (United Kingdom) or search for England (United Kingdom) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

evertheless, he chooses to give the North what advantage he can by quoting Mr. Russell's anecdote, and saying "if it be true,"&c., knowing that with his admirers it will have the same effect as if it were true. This is the meanest act we ever knew of the Archbishop, and shows what men, with some reputation, for fairness, may descend to in maintaining a bad cause. It is passing strange that a learned and ardent Irishman like the Archbishop, who desires the separation of Ireland from Great Britain, should throw his influence in behalf of the coercion of the Southern people to an alliance with those whom they loathe, and the sovereign Southern States into a union to which they will never submit. It may, in a measure, be accounted for by the fact that the Arch bishop is an intimate friend of the arch-fiend Seward. It is not the first time that the route of the "devil's walk" was through a Bishop's palace. Again, whatever be the Archbishop's motive, it is certain that after his coe
t gunning. Old Craney Island will prove a terror to Lincoln's ships, should they venture within range of our guns. On the defence of this small island, now so well fortified and so handsomely improved, depended the safety of the "old borough," and of Portsmouth and the surrounding country in 1813, and should Lincoln's war vessels open upon our fortifications, our safety may again, in a great measure, depend upon the strength and power of its batteries. Now, as in the last war with Great Britain, it is supposed the enemy may attempt a landing at some point on the bay shore; but the attempt, nearly half a century ago, was, unfortunately for John Bull's fighting men, made at Craney Island, which, as is well known, was defended in a manner that reflected lasting honor upon the noble band of heroes who took part in that important battle, as well as upon the State and country at large. The bravery and enthusiasm exhibited by our small force on that occasion, and the complete success
by an offer of seven per cent., and are at this moment compelled to pay ten or twelve per cent. We find, therefore, that while £60,000,000 annually would be added to their national debt, £6,000,000 annually would be added to the charge of that debt, so that four years and three-quarters of their present expenditure would saddle them with a burthen equal to that which we have incurred in a century and a half. Mr. Gladstone has to provide some £28,000,000 to satisfy the public creditors of Great Britain. In the year 1866, if the American war should be protracted so long, Mr. Chase's successor will have to provide rather more than that sum for the creditors of the Union. It is obvious to remark that the war may not be carried on so long, or continued at so heavy a cost; and, indeed, the exorbitant propositions of Congress were probably based upon the assumption that the way to make short work was to go to work unsparingly at first. But the history of the campaign up to the present
Two days later from Europe.arrival of the Arabia. The Royal mail steamer Arabia, from Liverpool at 10 o'clock A. M., on the 24th, via Queenstown on the afternoon of the 25th of August, arrived at Halifax at 11 o'clock on Tuesday last. The Arabia has 102 passengers, and £11,754 in specie. Great Britain. Baron de Videl has been sentenced to a year's imprisonment for the assault on his son, and the latter to a month's imprisonment for refusing to give evidence against his parent. France. The Independence Belge publishes the substance of an autograph letter from the Emperor to the Pope, intimating that if the condition of affairs be ameliorated the present status quo will be maintained. The expenses of the French Department of War the year 1862 will be £1,200,000 more than the present year. The Paris Bourse has been less firm; rentes 68f. 50 Italy. The correspondent of the London Times gives a very gloomy account of the state of affairs at Na
the powers most menaced and affronted by the republic rejoice in its researches among the fragments? Certainly England has not by a word or deed within her borders exhibited trace of the passions attributed to her by many bitter enemies Great Britain. The reports industriously circulated in some American journals that Great Britain has demanded or solicited the establishment of a free port for the exit of cotton are untrue There is no foundation whatever for such statements, which areGreat Britain has demanded or solicited the establishment of a free port for the exit of cotton are untrue There is no foundation whatever for such statements, which are prepared by the same people who originate the stories of Admiral Milne's dispatches and views in reference to the blockade. The indifference to foreign politics which has marked the proceedings of the Congress has been a suitable commentary on the mode in which. affairs have been treated in Europe. Mr. Sumner was severely rebuked for alluding to the probable effects of the increase of the Morrill tariff on the sentiments of France and England; as if the Senate regarded such an allusion as a