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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 26 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 20 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 6 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Cilicia (Turkey) or search for Cilicia (Turkey) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 3 (search)
He served also in Cilicia, A very extensive country of Hither Asia; lying between Pamphylia to the west, Mount Taurus and Amanus to the north, Syria to the east, and the Mediterranean to the south. It was anciently famous for saffron; and hair-cloth, called by the Romans cilicium, was the manufacture of this country. under Servilius Isauricus, but only for a short time; as upon receiving intelligence of Sylla's death, he returned with all speed to Rome, in expectation of what might follow from a fresh agitation set on foot by Marcus Lepidus. Distrusting, however, the abilities of this leader, and finding the times less favourable for the execution of this project than he had at first imagined, he abandoned all thoughts of joining Lepidus, although he received the most tempting offers.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 8 (search)
Quitting therefore the province before the expiration of the usual term, he betook himself to the Latin colonies, which were then eagerly agitating the design of obtaining the freedom of Rome; and he would have stirred them up to some bold attempt, had not the consuls, to prevent any commotion, detained for some time the legions which had been raised for service in Cilicia. But this did not deter him from making, soon afterwards, a still greater effort within the precincts of the city itself.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 44 (search)
nd most necessary parts into a few books; to make as large a collection as possible of works in the Greek and Latin languages, for the public use; the province of providing and putting them in proper order being assigned to Marcus Varro. He intended likewise to drain the Pomptine marshes, to cut a channel for the discharge of the waters of the lake Fucinus, to form a road from the Upper Sea through the ridge of the Appenine to the Tiber; to make a cut through the isthmus of Corinth, to reduce the Dacians, who had over-run Pontus and Thrace, within their proper limits, and then to make war upon the Parthians, through the Lesser Armenia, but not to risk a general engagement with them, until he had made some trial of their prowess in war. But in the midst of all his undertakings and projects, he was carried off by death; before I speak of which, it may not be improper to give an account of his person, dress, and manners, together with what relates to his pursuits, both civil and military.