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T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 38 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 36 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 24 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 18 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 12 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Bacchides, or The Twin Sisters (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 8 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan). You can also browse the collection for Ephesus (Turkey) or search for Ephesus (Turkey) in all documents.

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C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES of THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 33 (search)
Besides all this, Scipio gave orders for seizing the treasures of the temple of Diana at Ephesus, with all the statues of that goddess. But when he came to the temple, attended by many persons of senatorian rank, he received letters from Pompey, desiring him to lay aside all other concerns, and make what haste he could to join him, because Caesar had passed into Greece all other concerns, and make what haste he could to join him, because Caesar had passed into Greece with his whole army. In consequence of this order, he sent back the senators who had been summoned to attend him at Ephesus, made preparations for passing into Macedonia, and began his march a few days after. Thus the Ephesian treasures escaped being plundered.
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan), CAESAR'S COMMENTARIES of THE CIVIL WAR. , chapter 105 (search)
When Caesar arrived in Asia he found that T. Ampius, having formed the design of seizing the treasures of the Ephesian Diana, and summoned all the senators in the province to bear witness to the sum taken, had quitted that project upon Caesar's approach, and betaken himself to flight. Thus was the temple of Ephesus a second time saved from plunder by Caesar. It was remarked in the temple of Minerva at Elis, that the very day Caesar gained the battle of Pharsalia, the image of victory, which before stood fronting the statue of the goddess, turned towards the portal of the temple. The same day, at Antioch in Syria, such a noise of fighting and trumpets was heard two several times, that the inhabitants ran to arms and manned their walls. The like